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Diversity Innovation Grant Program

Diversity Innovation Grant Header

As part of Monmouth University’s commitment to creating an inclusive, affirming, and equitable campus community, the Office of the Provost and Intercultural Center launched a new Diversity Innovation Grant (DIG) pilot program in the Spring of 2021 to provide encouragement and financial support to members of the campus community who want to take an active role in our shared commitment.

Reviewed by a subcommittee within the President’s Advisory Council for Diversity and Inclusion,  the first round of submissions included several academic, research and co-curricular initiatives that were supported with DIG awards. Following the success of the initial pilot, the DIG program now continues on an annual basis to invite projects that encourage conversation, learning, and connection across race, religion, class, immigration status, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, ability, and nationality to create opportunities for belonging and to strengthen our sense of community.

View the past & current recipients:

AY 2023 Awardees

1.Continuing to Grow (School of Science)
2. Monmouth University’s Multisensory Environment (OTD Program)
3. Advancing Anti-Racism through Intergenerational Dialogue (School of Social Work)
4. Black Student Athlete Huddle (Athletics)
5. Diversity Lives Here: Representation though Art (Student Organization)
6.OK Trenton Screening (History and Anthropology)
7. Skillset: First to Fly Career Development Series (Career Development/First to Fly)
8. The First, Too: First-Generation Faculty Network (School of Education/First to Fly)
9. The InfoAge Science and History Museums – Dr. Walter McAfee Exhibit (History and Anthropology)
10. This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture (History and Anthropology)
11. Advancing the Visibility of Antiracist Resources (School of Education)
12. The 369th: Together, We Rose (Awarded AY22 grant continuation) (Communications and the Honors School)

AY 2022 Awardees

1. Asbury Park Museum Pop-Up Traveling Exhibit (#2), “Diverse Music Styles in a Segregated City” (History and Anthropology)
2. Gender Affirming Voice and Communication Clinic at Monmouth University’s Center for Speech and Language Disorders: Serving Community Partners and Training Future Speech-Language Pathologists (SLP-School of Education)
3. Inaugural Julian Abele “Out of the Shadows” Virtual Symposium (History and Anthropology)
4. Monmouth Artist for Diversity and Inclusion 2021-22 (Music and Theater)
5. The 369th: Together, We Rose (Communications and the Honors School)
6. Voices for Change: Voting, Advocacy and Action (School of Social Work)
7. Monmouth University Student Organizer Clinic (MU-SOC) (Sociology, Political Science, and Social Work)
8. Assessing the Language Patterns of Autism Professionals to Promote Inclusive Professional Services and Teaching Resources (SLP- School of Education)
9. Two Assistive Technology Tools as One: Using Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC) Applications to Control Smart Voice Assistant Alexa (SLP – School of Education)
10. Crossroads Collective (Department of English)

AY 2021 Awardees

Programs included, “Paradoxical Paradise: An African American Oral History and Mapping Project on Asbury Park,” a featured speaker program exploring “Genetics, Genomics, and Racism,” and an oral history project commemorating distinguished African American mathematical physicist and former Monmouth faculty member, Walter McAfee Ph.D,’85HN, through interviews with his former colleagues and family members. Additional programs throughout the Spring semester that received funding support included the Monmouth University Student Organizer Clinic (MU-SOC), The 369th: Together, We Rose documentary project, Black Student-Athletes: Paving the Way, Monmouth Artists for Diversity and Inclusion (MADI), Recreating the Black Brain Belt: Red Bank, New Jersey, and the Learn to be Antiracist teaching and pedagogy resource site.

Application:

Applicants must be a current Monmouth University student/student organization, staff, or faculty member. We anticipate continuing to make awards across all campus roles, and strongly encourage collaborative applications from all members of the campus community. Student applicants must be affiliated with a registered student organization or have the support and/or partnership with an academic or administrative department.

Proposals will be reviewed and scored by the Office of the Provost, the Intercultural Center, and members of a subcommittee from the President’s Advisory Council on Diversity and Inclusion. Please note, there is a $10,000 cap on all project submissions for the 2023-24 cycle. Additionally, some projects may receive a partial grant based on project review and fund availability.

Applications must include:

  • Description of the project and involved organizers.
  • How the program fits into the purpose of the grant and whether the project is academic or co-curricular in nature.
  • Learning or programmatic outcomes.
  • Detailed budget projections including the proposed use of funds.
  • Timeline for each part of the proposal including a draft schedule from planning to completion of the proposed program/project.
  • Selected measures to gauge the success of the program/project.

Deadlines: Applications for the AY 2023  are now closed! The AY 2024 cycle will open again in the spring. Proposals selected to receive a grant may receive or full or partial grant, depending on feasibility and availability of funds.

Project Guidelines

Priority will be given to:

  • Proposals that promote cross-campus, intergroup, and partnership approaches to support community-building.
  • Proposals that will have a lasting impact, such as a learning community or proposed integration of diversity into curriculum or series of events.
  • Proposals that demonstrate the ability to continue beyond the first year of funding. Funds are primarily considered one-time seed funds, however, this is also a vehicle to request co-sponsorship for ongoing activity.

Proposals will be evaluated based on:

  • Relevance to advancing an inclusive campus culture.
  • Nature of impact on participants.
  • Budget feasibility, realistic accounting for costs. Note: costs or fees associated with any outside speakers must be reflected in your budget.
  • Demonstrated campus partner commitment.
  • The feasibility that the project can be completed in the time outlined.

Project Examples:

  • Creating a learning community to promote the development of knowledge or skill-building through a facilitated reading group, series of workshops, or training and planned activities to extend the skills learned.
  • Creating or sustaining a key resource to fill a campus need, that will advance an inclusive culture.
  • Speaker, lecture, or performer honorariums.
  • Research project support.
  • Innovations in teaching and performance that aim to promote inclusion in the classroom.
  • Activities that promote community-building, using an intergroup, multi-unit, or partnership approach.
  • One-time or ongoing activities that focus on recruitment and retention of historically underrepresented students, faculty, and staff.
  • Conference and presentation support as long as it is within current University travel guidelines.