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Steady Support for Russia Sanctions

Monday, May 16, 2022

Majority back U.S. sending weapons to Ukraine

West Long Branch, NJ – Americans of all partisan stripes continue to back sanctions on Russia – including a fuel import ban – in response to its invasion of Ukraine. The Monmouth (“Mon-muth”) University Poll finds that public opinion has barely budged in the past two months – not only on support for sanctions, but on their impact both in Russia and here in the United States. Large majorities are in favor of supplying arms to Ukraine and bolstering the security of our European allies with U.S. troops. Most Americans worry about the potential use of nuclear weapons in the conflict, although that concern has declined slightly since March.

More than 3 in 4 Americans (77%) back the economic sanctions imposed on Russia in response to its invasion of Ukraine. This is down only slightly from Monmouth’s poll two months ago (81%), due entirely to a decrease among independents (from 78% to 71%). However, the percentage who support a ban on Russian gas and oil imports (78%) is identical to the March poll. At least three-quarters of Republicans, Democrats, and independents alike support these fuel import sanctions.

Most Americans believe these sanctions are affecting Russia’s ability to continue its invasion of Ukraine, but only 21% feel they are having a major impact, which is down nominally from 25% who said the same in March. Another 50% say these sanctions are having a minor impact. Just 24% feel they are having no impact. At the same time, most Americans believe these sanctions are hurting the U.S. economy to some degree – including 32% who say they are hurting a lot and 34% who say they are hurting a little. Another 30% feel these sanctions are having no impact on the nation’s economy. In March, 33% said the sanctions were hurting the U.S. economy a lot, 39% a little, and 25% not at all.

“America’s support for Ukraine remains steadfast even in the face of economic concerns at home,” said Patrick Murray, director of the independent Monmouth University Polling Institute.

The poll also finds more than 3 in 4 Americans (77%) support sending weapons to Ukraine. This support is higher among Democrats (88%) than it is among Republicans (77%) or independents (70%).  About 2 in 3 Americans (66%) support sending U.S. troops to support our European allies as a deterrent to keep Russia from invading those countries, which is similar to the 69% support recorded two months ago. On the military presence question, Democrats (78%) are more supportive than Republicans (65%) and independents (59%).

Just over 6 in 10 Americans are concerned that the conflict will lead to the use of nuclear weapons, including 21% who are very worried about this and 42% who are somewhat worried. The combined number (63%) who are worried about the possibility of a nuclear war is a few points lower than it was in March (69%). Concern on the nuclear question has dropped among Republicans (from 72% in March to 59%) and independents (from 65% to 57%) but has risen among Democrats (from 71% to 79%)

Public opinion is slightly negative on President Joe Biden’s handling of the Ukraine situation. Currently 43% approve – which is down from 46% two months ago – and 50% disapprove – which is up from 48% in March. Despite bipartisan support on the sanctions imposed by his administration, just 12% of Republicans give Biden a positive rating for his overall handling of the crisis, compared to 78% of Democrats who approve.

In other poll results, few Americans (5%) say that Russia’s actions in Ukraine are justified, while 90% say they are not justified. In March, 7% felt the Russians were justified.

The Monmouth University Poll was conducted by telephone from May 5 to 9, 2022 with 807 adults in the United States.  The question results in this release have a margin of error of +/- 3.5 percentage points. The poll was conducted by the Monmouth University Polling Institute in West Long Branch, NJ.

QUESTIONS AND RESULTS     

(* Some columns may not add to 100% due to rounding.)

[Q1-22 previously released.]

23.Do you feel Russia’s actions in Ukraine are justified or not justified?

  TREND:May
2022
March
2022
Justified5%7%
Not justified90%89%
(VOL) Don’t know4%4%
 (n)(807)(809)

24.Do you approve or disapprove of the way President Biden is handling the Ukraine situation?

  TREND:May
2022
March
2022
Approve43%46%
Disapprove50%48%
(VOL) Don’t know7%6%
 (n)(807)(809)

25.The United States imposed economic sanctions on Russia in response to this situation. Do you support or oppose these sanctions?

  TREND:May
2022
March
2022
Support77%81%
Oppose16%16%
(VOL) Don’t know6%4%
 (n)(807)(809)

26.Do you think these economic sanctions are having a major impact, minor impact, or no impact on Russia’s ability to continue its invasion of Ukraine?

  TREND:May
2022
March
2022
Major impact21%25%
Minor impact50%49%
No impact24%22%
(VOL) Don’t know5%5%
 (n)(807)(809)

27.Do you think these sanctions are hurting the U.S. economy or generally having no impact on the U.S. economy? [If HURTING: Are they hurting a lot, or just a little?]

  TREND:May
2022
March
2022
Hurting, a lot32%33%
Hurting, a little34%39%
No impact30%25%
(VOL) Don’t know4%3%
 (n)(807)(809)

28.Do you support or oppose the U.S. ban on Russian gas and oil imports?

  TREND:May
2022
March
2022
Support78%78%
Oppose18%17%
(VOL) Don’t know4%5%
 (n)(807)(809)

29.Do you support or oppose the United States sending weapons to Ukraine?

 May
2022
Support77%
Oppose21%
(VOL) Don’t know2%
 (n)(807)

30.Do you support or oppose the United States sending troops to support our European allies as a deterrent to keep Russia from invading those countries?

  TREND:May
2022
March
2022
Support66%69%
Oppose30%28%
(VOL) Don’t know3%3%
 (n)(807)(809)

31.Are you worried that the conflict in Ukraine will lead to the use of nuclear weapons – would you say very worried, somewhat worried, not too worried, or not at all worried?

  TREND:May
2022
March
2022
Very worried21%22%
Somewhat worried42%47%
Not too worried22%18%
Not at all worried14%12%
(VOL) Don’t know0%1%
 (n)(807)(809)

[Q32-38 held for future release.]

METHODOLOGY

The Monmouth University Poll was sponsored and conducted by the Monmouth University Polling Institute from May 5 to 9, 2022 with a probability-based national random sample of 807 adults age 18 and older. This includes 284 contacted by a live interviewer on a landline telephone and 523 contacted by a live interviewer on a cell phone, in English. Telephone numbers were selected through a mix of random digit dialing and list-based sampling. Landline respondents were selected with a modified Troldahl-Carter youngest adult household screen. Interviewing services were provided by Braun Research, with sample obtained from Dynata (RDD, n=532), Aristotle (list, n=137) and a panel of prior Monmouth poll participants (n=138). Monmouth is responsible for all aspects of the survey design, data weighting and analysis. The full sample is weighted for region, age, education, gender and race based on US Census information (ACS 2018 one-year survey). For results based on this sample, one can say with 95% confidence that the error attributable to sampling has a maximum margin of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points (unadjusted for sample design). Sampling error can be larger for sub-groups (see table below). In addition to sampling error, one should bear in mind that question wording and practical difficulties in conducting surveys can introduce error or bias into the findings of opinion polls.


DEMOGRAPHICS (weighted)
Self-Reported
30% Republican
43% Independent
27% Democrat
 
49% Male
51% Female
 
30% 18-34
32% 35-54
38% 55+
 
63% White
12% Black
17% Hispanic
  8% Asian/Other
 
69% No degree
31% 4 year degree

Click on pdf file link below for full methodology and crosstabs by key demographic groups.

Download this Poll Report with crosstabs