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CLONet Workshop

The Coastal Lakes Observing Network (CLONet) will host its annual workshop on Tuesday, Nov. 17, from 12-2 p.m. Through the CLONet project, Monmouth University School of Science and Urban Coast Institute (UCI) staff and students partner with municipalities and community groups to organize citizen science efforts dedicated to understanding the causes of environmental problems facing Deal Lake, Fletcher Lake, Lake Como, Lake Takanassee, Spring Lake, Silver Lake, Sunset Lake, Sylvan Lake, Wesley Lake and Wreck Pond.

The workshop is an opportunity for CLONet volunteers to share their experiences with fellow citizen scientists and find out what the water quality sampling data they’ve collected to date reveals. New individuals and groups interested in volunteering are welcome to attend.

Accountability for Climate Change Harms in New Jersey: Scientific, Legal and Policy Perspectives

Photo shows a pier jutting into the ocean along the Jersey shore

Members of the public can register now for the free online panel event Accountability for Climate Change Harms in New Jersey: Scientific, Legal and Policy Perspectives, to be held from 3 – 4:15 p.m. on Wednesday, August 19, 2020. The event is being organized by the Climate Integrity Project, the Union of Concerned Scientists and Monmouth University.

This event is intended to educate the state’s legal and policy communities and the public on local climate impacts and associated costs now facing communities and taxpayers, and to initiate a dialogue on the growing trend of climate damages litigation in the U.S. Panelists will discuss the extent of climate harms in New Jersey as well as the scientific basis for holding the fossil fuel industry accountable for them. Panelists will also offer legal and community perspectives on damages litigation as a means to shift some of the burden from taxpayers to polluters.

The discussion will be moderated by Monmouth University Rechnitz Family/Urban Coast Institute Endowed Chair in Marine and Environmental Law and Policy Randall Abate. Panel members will include Brenda Ekwurzel, director of climate science with the Union of Concerned Scientists Climate & Energy Program; Nathaly Agosto Filión, chief sustainability officer, City of Newark; and Marco Simons, general counsel, EarthRights International. Opening remarks will be delivered by New Jersey State Sen. Joseph Cryan.

Attendees will be provided a link to the webinar after registering.

Cancelled: Accountability for Climate Change Harms in New Jersey: Scientific, Legal and Policy Perspectives

This event is intended to educate the state’s legal and policy communities and the public on local climate impacts and associated costs now facing communities and taxpayers, and to initiate a dialogue on the growing trend of climate damages litigation in the U.S. Panelists will discuss the extent of climate harms in New Jersey as well as the scientific basis for holding the fossil fuel industry accountable for them. Panelists will also offer legal and community perspectives on damages litigation as a means to shift some of the burden from taxpayers to polluters.

Panel members will include Bob Kopp, director of the Rutgers University Institute of Earth, Ocean & Atmospheric Sciences; Brenda Ekwurzel, director of climate science with the Union of Concerned Scientists Climate & Energy Program; and Jonathan Abady, a partner with Emery Celli Brinckerhoff & Abady LLP. The discussion will be moderated by Monmouth University Rechnitz Family/Urban Coast Institute Endowed Chair in Marine and Environmental Law and Policy Randall Abate. The names of additional speakers will soon follow.

The event will take place from 3:30-5:15 p.m. at the Wilson Hall Auditorium. A free reception will follow.  For more information, contact Aliya Satku at asatku@monmouth.edu or (732) 263-5662.

CANCELLED — Atlantic Estuarine Research Society (AERS) Spring Meeting

Image of Flyer for AERS Spring 2020 Meeting at Monmouth University
PLEASE NOTE: This event has been cancelled due to COVID-19 concerns.

Registration is now open for the Atlantic Estuarine Research Society (AERS) Spring Meeting, to be held March 26-28 at Monmouth University. With a theme of “Estuarine Science in a Changing Climate,” the event will feature expert presentations, networking opportunities, a poster session, field trips and a concurrent Margaret A. Davidson Coastal Careers Workshop on March 26.

AERS brings together students, scientists, managers, and educators from the states of Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, D.C., to discuss estuarine and coastal environmental issues and policies. The group’s mission is to a foster broader interest in our environment by increasing public awareness of current issues.

Among the planned field trips are a walking and birding tour of Sandy Hook, a Cheesequake State Park and Matawan Creek shark attack tour, and a ride aboard Monmouth University’s research vessel Heidi Lynn Sculthorpe in the Sandy Hook Bay area. Keynote speakers include Rutgers University Climate Institute Co-Director Anthony Broccoli, Partnership for the Delaware Estuary Senior Science Director Danielle Kreeger, and Monmouth University Marine and Environmental Biology and Policy Program Director John Tiedemann. Participants may submit abstracts until Feb. 18 for oral presentations or poster presentations.

Students are eligible for discounted registration costs and early bird rates are available through Feb. 22. Registration will also include an opening night social and a day two continental breakfast, lunch and evening banquet.

Separate registration is required for the career workshop, which will feature a morning of talks on career options, employment prospects, successful pathways toward local opportunities and opportunities around the nation, as well as inspirational testimonies from coastal professionals. The afternoon will offer a series of smaller group discussions about various skills needed to succeed, such as leadership, networking, mentors, publishing, resumes, and more. Students and young professionals in the coastal and environmental field are encouraged to attend.

 

 

Future of the Ocean Symposium and Champion of the Ocean Awards Luncheon

The Urban Coast Institute (UCI) will host its 15th annual Future of the Ocean Symposium and Champion of the Ocean Awards Luncheon on Tuesday, October 22, at Wilson Hall.

With a theme of An Ocean for All: Ecosystems, Economies & People,  the symposium will assemble nationally recognized experts to share insights on the research, science and technology priorities necessary to ensure our oceans continue to thrive ecologically while serving an expanding cross-section of users.

Monmouth University President Emeritus and UCI Ocean Policy Fellow Paul G. Gaffney II will moderate a panel discussion with perspectives from the ports/maritime, offshore wind, ocean sciences and marine conservation communities. Rear Admiral Timothy Gallaudet, deputy director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), will deliver plenary remarks. The panel will include Bradley Campbell, Conservation Law Foundation executive director and former New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection commissioner; Scott Glenn, distinguished professor in the Rutgers University Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences and co-director of the Center for Ocean Observing Leadership; David Hang, Ørsted U.S. Offshore Wind president; and Bethann Rooney, deputy director, Port Department, Port Authority of New York & New Jersey.

At the subsequent luncheon, the UCI will honor three symposium speakers with Champion of the Ocean Awards. The UCI will present its highest honor, the National Champion of the Ocean Award, to Gallaudet; the Regional Champion of the Ocean Award to Campbell; and the Coastal and Ocean Leadership Award to Glenn.

The symposium will take place from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the Wilson Hall Auditorium. The luncheon will directly follow the symposium from noon to 2 p.m. in the Wilson Hall Versailles and Pompeii rooms.

Tickets are required for the luncheon, with proceeds supporting student research activities through the UCI Scholars Program.

For additional information, contact Karl Vilacoba at 732-571-3688 or kvilacob@monmouth.edu.

Urban Coast Institute Marine & Environment Speaker Series

Money, Mandate, and Water Management

with

Professor Keith Rizzardi, St. Thomas University School of Law

 

Professor Keith Rizzardi from St. Thomas University School of Law will speak about climate change, rising sea levels, and professional ethics. Discussions will also include insights into how the historic commitment to water management in South Florida has dramatically decreased and considerations on how water managers can best prepare before the next disaster strikes in the future.

For more information, contact Doris Meyer, Urban Coast Institute, at 732-263-5662 or dmeyer@monmouth.edu.

Our Ocean and Beaches: A Record of Success and New Challenges to Face

Please Note: This event if free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Event Schedule

Registration & Coffee: 9:30 – 10:00 a.m.

Program: 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Program Participants

  • Moderator: Joseph M. Kyrillos,  State Senator (Ret.) and Monmouth University Public Servant-in-Residence 2018-19

PANELISTS:

  • Chris Daggett, Former Regional Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
  • Cindy Zipf, Executive Director of Clean Ocean Action
  • Tony MacDonald, Director of the Monmouth University Urban Coast Institute

 

Climate Change, Coasts & Communities Symposium

The “new normal” of increased storm events, flooding, sea level rise, and coastal erosion from climate change presents daunting adaptation challenges for New Jersey in the years ahead. This symposium features leading experts in climate change adaptation law and science to discuss lessons learned from other states and countries to assist New Jersey in navigating these challenges.

Topics will include:

  • S. and Australian case studies in coastal adaptation;
  • Public health dimensions of coastal adaptation;
  • Human rights impacts to vulnerable coastal communities;
  • Climate change impacts to “voiceless” communities (future generations, wildlife, and natural resources);
  • Strategies to combat climate change-induced and other anthropogenic factors in eutrophication of coastal marine ecosystems, and the impacts to ecosystem services and the communities who depend on them.

Visit the symposium web site for a full list of speakers and more event details. Admission is free for Monmouth employees and students (registration required), $35 for the general public, and $25 for Monmouth alumni and non-Monmouth students. (Cost covers Wednesday evening reception and Thursday breakfast, lunch and refreshments.)

For more information, contact Professor Randall S. Abate at 732-571-3641 or rabate@monmouth.edu.

 

UCI Marine and Environmental Luncheon Speaker Series

State of Coastal and Ocean Acidification in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic

Coastal and ocean acidification have significant scientific and societal ramifications including the alteration of ocean biogeochemistry, ecological consequences associated with altered ecosystems, and economic losses due to the decreased survival of commercially important organisms. Guest speaker Dr. Grace Saba, Assistant Professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Center for Ocean Observing Leadership at Rutgers University will cover what we know and do not yet know about acidification in the Mid-Atlantic. We will examine recommendations from the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Acidification Network (MACAN) to enhance regional acidification monitoring and improve understanding of potential ecological impacts.

About the Speaker

Dr. Saba is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Center for Ocean Observing Leadership at Rutgers University. She also serves as co-coordinator for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Acidification Network (MACAN). She received her B.S in Aquatic Biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara and her Ph.D. in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary.

Related Links

UCI Blog

UCI Marine & Environmental Speaker Series

Menhaden Defenders: Why Defend?

The population of Atlantic menhaden (bunker) is at an all-time low. The loss of menhaden spells disaster for striped bass, tuna, bluefish, weakfish, osprey, whales, birds, and marine mammals. Captain Paul Eidman, founder of Menhaden Defenders, discusses the importance of rebuilding this stock. If we want to protect our game fish and marine mammals, we must protect their food! Come learn what you can do to ensure these fish remain abundant in our coastal waters.

Related Links

UCI Blog