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Toni Morrison Day

Photo of author Toni Morrison with one of her more famous quotes: This is precisely the time when artists go to work. There is no time for despair, no place for self-pity, no need for silence, no room for fear. We speak, we write, we do language. That is how civilizations heal.

Join us for a celebration of the life and works of Toni Morrison: author, activist, academic, and Nobel Laureate.

These events are free and open to the public. For questions or additional information, please contact Professor Linda Sacks at lsacks@monmouth.edu.

Sponsored by the Department of English, the Guggenheim Memorial Library and the Honors School.

Schedule of Events

Library 101

10:00 – 11:25 a.m. | Dr. Courtney Werner – Welcome; Professor Beth Sara Swanson – Opening remarks; Dr. Walter Greason – Keynote address

11:40 a.m. – 4:10 p.m. | Sigma Tau Delta: marathon reading of Sula, read in its entirety by student and faculty volunteers

4:30 – 5:50 p.m. |  Dr. Anwar Uhuru: “Finding Self Regard in the Works of Toni Morrison,” followed by discussion

6:00 – 8:00 p.m. | Screening: Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (2019), sponsored by the Honors School

Library 102

10:05 a.m. – 4:10 p.m. | Visit the Toni Morrison Gallery – enjoy food and refreshments

Faculty Symposium

Magill 107

11:40 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. | Pedagogy Panel: “Teaching Toni Morrison”

1:15 – 2:35 p.m. | Scholarship Roundtable: “Morrison: History, Themes, and Craft”

Wilson 104

10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. | Open Room: Student & Faculty maker/creator space

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. | Collage Workshop with Professor Linh Dao, Department of Art and Design

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. |  Collage Workshop with Professor Linh Dao (video)

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Honors School Research Conference Fall 2019

Join us to support Honors School students who are presenting their Capstone Projects at the Fall 2019 Research Conference. Student presenters come from disciplines across the university, with projects covering unique topics within their majors.

Image shows Fall 2019 Honors School Research Conference schedule of student presenters. Click for details with larger image,

Click for larger image and details.

Conference Schedule

Session 1: 1:30 – 3:00 p. m.

Opening Remarks:
Dr. Nancy J. Mezey, Dean of the Honors School

  • Kathy Chen, Chemistry with a Concentration in Biochemistry
  • Alexa LaVere, Health Studies
  • Mika Schievelbein, Chemistry with a Concentration in Biochemistry
  • Catherine Harvey, History and Secondary Education
  • Alexia Raess, Social Work
  • Melanie Broman, English with a Concentration in Creative Writing
  • Michael Scognomillo, Clinical Laboratory Sciences

Break: 3 – 3:20 p.m.  (light refreshments will be available)

Session 2: 3:20 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

  • Chanell Singletary-Eskridge, Psychology
  • Thomas Prioli, History and Political Science
  • Nicole Tarsitano, English
  • Angelica Pellone, Interdisciplinary Studies and Elementary Education
  • Gianni Mazzone, Business, Economics and Finance
    Omar Shah, Chemistry with a Concentration in Biochemistry
  • Jon P. Suttile, Political Science
  • Brian Mathew, Biology with a Concentration in Molecular Cell Physiology

Closing Remarks: Dr. Nancy J. Mezey

For more information, please contact Kate Sosnowski at ksosnows@monmouth.edu  or 732-263-5308.

Reproductive Justice 2019: Perils and Prospects

The personal is the political has been a part of the American vocabulary since at least the 1960s. Initially this argument was a source of identity and politics-making in the male public arena, not the female domestic space. Recently, this personal has been targeted in both Western Europe and North America where varying nationalist resurgences have resulted in anti-choice legislation. In response, some American states have passed reproductive-specific protections through legislative acts of their own. Against the backdrop of culture war, what does this renewed attention to female agency and their bodies say about our broken, polarized present? What prospects lay ahead for women? And more importantly, what perils?

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Opening Remarks

Dr. Nancy Mezey – Dean of the Honors School

Moderator

Dr. Rekha Datta – Interim Provost

Host and Organizer

Dr. L. Benjamin Rolsky

Panelists

Anne C. Deepak – Associate Professor of Social Work

Sasha N. Canan – Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education

Lazara G. Paz-Gonzalez – Adjunct Professor of Nursing and Health Studies

Sponsored By:

The Provost’s Office, The School of Humanities & Social Science and the Department of History & Anthropology in conjunction with the Program in Gender and Intersectionality Studies, The University Library, The Leon Hess Business School, The School of Education, The School of Social Work, and The Honors School.

Film Screening – Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve

The Honors School presents a special screening of the acclaimed new documentary that takes audiences inside the world’s most powerful financial institution, Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve.

DATE: Friday, April 18

SCREENING TIME: 11:30 a.m.

LOCATION: Pollak Theatre

Watch the trailer: www.moneyfornothingthemovie.org

100 years after its creation, the power of the Federal Reserve has never been greater. Markets around the world hold their breath in anticipation of the Fed Chairman’s every word. Yet the average American knows very little about the most powerful financial institution on earth.

Narrated by acclaimed actor Liev Schreiber, Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve is the first film to take viewers inside America’s central bank and reveal the impact of Fed policies – past, present, and future – on our lives. As Ben Bernanke steps down, join incoming Fed Chair Janet Yellen, former Fed Chair Paul Volcker, and many of the world’s best financial minds as they debate the decisions that led the global economy to the brink of collapse and ask whether me might be headed there again.

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