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Small Island

adapted by Helen Edmundson

based on the novel by Andrea Levy

Andrea Levy’s Orange Prize-winning novel Small Island comes to life in an epic new theatre adaptation. Experience the play in cinemas, filmed live on stage as part of National Theatre Live’s 10th birthday.

Small Island embarks on a journey from Jamaica to Britain, through the Second World War to 1948 – the year the HMT Empire Windrush docked at Tilbury, England.

The play follows three intricately connected stories. Hortense yearns for a new life away from rural Jamaica, Gilbert dreams of becoming a lawyer, and Queenie longs to escape her Lincolnshire roots. Hope and humanity meet stubborn reality as the play traces the tangled history of Jamaica and the UK.

A company of 40 actors take to the stage of the National Theatre in London in this timely and moving story.

Water Lilies of Monet: The Magic of Water and Light

Voyage through the masterpieces and obsessions of the genius and founder of Impressionism, Claude Monet. An art-world disruptor at the turn of the 20th century whose obsession with capturing light and water broke all convention, Monet revolutionized Modern Art with his timeless masterpieces.

An in-depth, exclusive tour led by Monet scholars of the museums that house the largest collections of the prolific artist’s lilies paintings including the Musée Marmottan Monet, the Orsay Museum, the world-famous panels at L’Orangerie and concluding with Monet’s own house and gardens at Giverny, the site where his fascination for water lilies was born.

Natalie Diaz

Native American poet Natalie Diaz will be in residence at Monmouth University on Thursday, April 17 and Friday, April 18th, 2014.

On Thursday, 17th, at 11:00 a.m., she will speak about the language revitalization program at Fort Mojave, her home reservation, where she works with the last Elder speakers of the Mojave language. At 3:00 p.m. she will conduct a poetry workshop with students and community members. At 4:30 p.m. she will read her poems.

On Friday, 18th, Natalie Diaz will participate in the afternoon launch of The Monmouth Review, the student-edited literary and arts journal, outside Wilson Hall.

Natalie Diaz grew up in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles, California, on the banks of the Colorado River. She is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Community.

Her poems have appeared in The North American Review, The Southeast Review, Prairie Schooner, Spillway, Best New Poets 2007, The Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses, and other literary journals and anthologies. Her book, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2012.

Her book will be available for purchase and signing at the poetry reading.

This residency is co-sponsored by the West Branch Arts Council and the Department of English.

UB40 – NEW DATE!!

World-famous reggae stars UB40 are set to mark their 40th anniversary with a US tour in support of their first album release in over four years. The band will play many of their seventeen Top 10 hit singles, including Kingston Town, Food For Thought, One In Ten, I Can’t Help Falling In Love With You, Don’t Break My Heart and Sing Our Own Song and, of course, Red, Red Wine. The concert will feature five of UB40’s six founding members, Robin Campbell, Brian Travers, Jimmy Brown, Earl Falconer and Norman Hassan, and long-time members Duncan Campbell, Martin Meredith, Lawrence Parry and Tony Mullings. UB40 formed in 1978, naming themselves after the unemployment benefit form, before releasing their debut album ‘Signing Off’ in August 1980 – considered by many to be one of the greatest reggae albums ever released by a British band. The band has forty UK Top 40 hit singles, sold over 100 million records and seen their albums reside in the UK’s Top 75 album chart for a combined period of eleven years, making them one of the most successful British groups of all time.