Skip to main content
CloseSearch

Supporting Systems and Communities in Achieving Racial Equality: A Groundwater Analysis – presented by Joyce James

Voices for Change: Voting, Advocacy, and Action

In this presentation, Ms. James will share her journey in developing the Texas Model for addressing Disproportionality and Disparities and the Groundwater Analysis for Addressing Racial Inequities© as the foundation for creating antiracist organizational cultures for undoing institutional and structural racism and improving outcomes for all populations. Participants will gain an increased understanding of the importance of cross systems collaborations and building partnerships with poor communities of color to remove the barriers that contribute to racial inequities. The session will include discussion of the pitfalls of well-meaning and well-intentioned leaders, who in isolation of an analysis of institutional and structural racism, and a racial equity lens, continue to unconsciously contribute to sustaining and often perpetuating racial inequities in the design and delivery of programs and services.

The Strengths of Black Families, presented by Denise McLane-Davison

Voices for Change: Voting, Advocacy, and Action

The political era of the Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, Gay Rights, and The Black Power Movement demanded the inclusion of rigorous research that centered racial and gender identity as significant narratives. The emergence of Black Studies and Women’s Studies, along with student-led and national organizations incorporating the same identity politics also demanded inclusion in intellectual landscapes. During this era Black social scientists blanketed the scholarship, theory, and treatment research that anchored African cultural values, traditions, knowledge, and generational behaviors as disruptive characteristics of pathologized Black family rhetoric. Collectively, cultural scholarship named the impact of adapting Black life to oppression and anti-Blackness policy. They declared the Black family as the fundamental source of strength of the Black community and as the defense for Black life from external threats. This session provides a historical and contemporary alignment on the Black strength perspective through racial pride, resistance, and resilience.

Emma Copley Eisenberg

The Visiting Writer’s series is thrilled to return for the 2021-22 season! The first event of the year will feature Monmouth University Adjunct Professor and Writer-In-Residence, Emma Copley Eisenberg.

Emma Copley Eisenberg’s fiction and nonfiction has appeared in McSweeney’s, Granta, The Virginia Quarterly Review, Tin House, Guernica, The Washington Post Magazine, and others. Her first book of nonfiction is The Third Rainbow Girl: The Long Life of a Double Murder in Appalachia which was a NYTimes notable book of 2020 and nominated for an Edgar and Lambda Literary Award. Raised in New York City, she lives in Philadelphia, where she co-directs Blue Stoop, a hub for the literary arts. Her next two books, a novel and a collection of short stories, are forthcoming from Hogarth (Penguin Random House).

Eisenberg will be reading from her book, The Third Rainbow Girl: The Long Life of a Double Murder in Appalachia and copies will be available for purchase through the University bookstore at the event.

Cancelled: Lives of the ‘Brows’: Autobiography, Taste, Ethics

Photo of Dr. Max Cavitch, Associate Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Max Cavitch, Associate Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania

Please join us for a guest lecture by Dr. Max Cavitch, Associate Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is also an affiliated faculty member of the programs in Cinema Studies, Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, and Psychoanalytic Studies.

Dr. Cavitch will be discussing literary taste and value in relation to autobiography—one of the world’s most popular and widely practiced genres. From “highbrow” triumphs of artistic intention to “middlebrow” narratives of historical significance to “lowbrow” tell-alls of gossipy celebrity, there are autobiographies to suit every taste. But what is “taste,” anyway? What does it have to do with “literary value”? And, moreover, what do either taste or literary value have to do with the question of whose lives and life-stories matter?

Refreshments will be served. Students, faculty, and interested members of the public are warmly invited to attend.

Free and open to the public.
Sponsored by the Wayne D. McMurray Endowed Chair in the Humanities, Dr. Kristin Bluemel

Toni Morrison Day

Photo of author Toni Morrison with one of her more famous quotes: This is precisely the time when artists go to work. There is no time for despair, no place for self-pity, no need for silence, no room for fear. We speak, we write, we do language. That is how civilizations heal.

Join us for a celebration of the life and works of Toni Morrison: author, activist, academic, and Nobel Laureate.

These events are free and open to the public. For questions or additional information, please contact Professor Linda Sacks at lsacks@monmouth.edu.

Sponsored by the Department of English, the Guggenheim Memorial Library and the Honors School.

Schedule of Events

Library 101

10:00 – 11:25 a.m. | Dr. Courtney Werner – Welcome; Professor Beth Sara Swanson – Opening remarks; Dr. Walter Greason – Keynote address

11:40 a.m. – 4:10 p.m. | Sigma Tau Delta: marathon reading of Sula, read in its entirety by student and faculty volunteers

4:30 – 5:50 p.m. |  Dr. Anwar Uhuru: “Finding Self Regard in the Works of Toni Morrison,” followed by discussion

6:00 – 8:00 p.m. | Screening: Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (2019), sponsored by the Honors School

Library 102

10:05 a.m. – 4:10 p.m. | Visit the Toni Morrison Gallery – enjoy food and refreshments

Faculty Symposium

Magill 107

11:40 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. | Pedagogy Panel: “Teaching Toni Morrison”

1:15 – 2:35 p.m. | Scholarship Roundtable: “Morrison: History, Themes, and Craft”

Wilson 104

10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. | Open Room: Student & Faculty maker/creator space

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. | Collage Workshop with Professor Linh Dao, Department of Art and Design

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. |  Collage Workshop with Professor Linh Dao (video)

Photo of Event Schedule Flyer - click to download schedule of events

Click Image to Download Event Schedule

 

Graduate English Meet-Up

Image shows drawings of Halloween pumpkins

A goosebump inducing evening of perfect readings for the season. Enjoy spooky readings of the season from faculty members and students. Meet and mingle with other Graduate students.

For more information, contact Michele McBride at mmcbride@monmouth.edu.

Ink & Electricity Lecture Series

This annual lecture series brings top scholars in the fields of digital humanities, media studies, the history of the book, print culture, and children’s literature to Monmouth University every fall.

STRANGER THAN FICTION:
THE NOVEL IN WEB 2.0

A Talk by Dr. Priya Joshi
Professor of English
Temple University

Fan sites, new writing platforms, and new markets for the novel are now produced and curated by readers on Web 2.0 platforms. This talk reviews the story of “literature” in the age of digital production with particular attention to the future of literary theory.

This event is free and open to the public and refreshments will be served.

Ink and Electricity is sponsored by the Wayne D. McMurray-Helen Bennett Endowed Chair in the Humanities at Monmouth University, Dr. Kristin Bluemel, professor of English. She can be reached at kbluemel@monmouth.edu or 732-571-3622.

Annual Graduate Symposium (English Dept.)

Call for Papers

The Graduate Symposium presents students with the unique opportunity to not only present their work before their peers, but also to hone their speaking skills while simultaneously building their resume.

All English Graduate students are welcome to submit papers and presentation proposals to Jennifer Broman (jennifer.l.broman@monmouth.edu).

Threesis Competition

What is the Threesis? Consider it an elevator pitch for your thesis (or any research you’ve done). Present a 3-minute long, non-jargon prose description of your thesis or research paper, and compete against your fellow Grad students for $25 Barnes & Noble gift card!

Small Island

adapted by Helen Edmundson

based on the novel by Andrea Levy

Andrea Levy’s Orange Prize-winning novel Small Island comes to life in an epic new theatre adaptation. Experience the play in cinemas, filmed live on stage as part of National Theatre Live’s 10th birthday.

Small Island embarks on a journey from Jamaica to Britain, through the Second World War to 1948 – the year the HMT Empire Windrush docked at Tilbury, England.

The play follows three intricately connected stories. Hortense yearns for a new life away from rural Jamaica, Gilbert dreams of becoming a lawyer, and Queenie longs to escape her Lincolnshire roots. Hope and humanity meet stubborn reality as the play traces the tangled history of Jamaica and the UK.

A company of 40 actors take to the stage of the National Theatre in London in this timely and moving story.

Water Lilies of Monet: The Magic of Water and Light

Voyage through the masterpieces and obsessions of the genius and founder of Impressionism, Claude Monet. An art-world disruptor at the turn of the 20th century whose obsession with capturing light and water broke all convention, Monet revolutionized Modern Art with his timeless masterpieces.

An in-depth, exclusive tour led by Monet scholars of the museums that house the largest collections of the prolific artist’s lilies paintings including the Musée Marmottan Monet, the Orsay Museum, the world-famous panels at L’Orangerie and concluding with Monet’s own house and gardens at Giverny, the site where his fascination for water lilies was born.