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Ghost Hunters Live

Since its 2004 Syfy Channel premiere, Ghost Hunters has become television’s #1 paranormal reality series. The show is now in its ninth season and is aired in more than 170 countries. Leader of The Atlantic Paranormal Society-Jason Hawes along with fellow lead investigator Steve Gonsalves, will now bring their experiences with the paranormal and understanding of unexplained disturbances to live audiences in their theater presentation.  Hear them talk about their scariest experiences, see unreleased footage from the show, and ask them questions about themselves or perhaps a ghostly experience of your own!
As members of The Atlantic Paranormal Society (TAPS), both Jason and Steve have made it their life’s mission to help anyone with questions pertaining to paranormal phenomena and ghost hunting. TAPS is a group of fairly ordinary people— office managers, factory workers, teachers and even psychic-hotline gurus— moonlighting to understand seemingly unexplainable disturbances.

Springsteen & I

Tickets on sale 9/16.

Forty years ago, Bruce Springsteen burst onto the rock scene and changed it forever. His music defines a generation, but behind the songs were remarkable stories about the fans who lived them. Come celebrate Bruce’s birthday with this documentary-biographical film directed by Baillie Walsh documenting his life and career through the eyes and insights of his fans throughout the world.

Presented by the Friends of Springsteen and Monmouth University’s Center for the Arts 

Celebrating One Hundred Years of Rabindranath Tagore’s Gitanjali

4:30 – 6:45 p.m. – Film Screening, Home and the World (Wilson Hall 104)

6:45 – 7:15 p.m. – Reception & Exhibit (Wilson Auditorium Lobby)

7:30 – 8:45 p.m. – A Garland of Music, Presented by Prabuddha Raha and friends (Wilson Auditorium)

This program is
a celebration of the thoughts, poetry, music, and artistry of Rabindranath
Tagore, and a commemoration of one hundred years of his Nobel Prize for
Literature, for his ‘Gitanjali’ an Offering in Songs.  In 1913, India’s renaissance poet, Rabindranath
Tagore became the first non-European and first Asian to win the Nobel Prize in
literature, with his Gitanjali, an offering in songs. Hailed as an
internationalist and a humanist, Tagore bridges the East and West through his
music, poetry, and writings and celebrates life in unison with God, Nature,
Love, Peace, and Humanity.

Through a creative interpretation of Tagore’s poetry
and music, Prabuddha Raha, a noted Rabindrasangeet artiste from Calcutta,
India, will perform as part of this program. 
A music instructor and established television and film playback singer
and music director, Raha has represented India at various international
settings, including Bangladesh, Singapore, Malaysia, and the United States.

Fall Poetry Festival

The day will consist of readings by nationally known poets, some of whom will conduct poetry workshops for participants.

The keynote presenters will be National Book Award Finalist Kim Addonizio and Editor of Southern Indiana Review, Ron Mitchell.

The festival will culminate with a reading by registered participants.

Admission to the readings is free and open to the public. The workshops, also free, will be open to registrants only: to register, email Dr. Michael Waters no later than Wednesday, October 30, at mgwaters@monmouth.edu

Schedule:

9:00-9:30 a.m.  Sign-in for registrants in Bey Hall (refreshments)

                  The Monmouth Review distributed to participants

9:45-10:45 a.m.  reading:  Laura McCullough / BCC

                                   Michael Broek / BCC

                                   Prescott Evarts, Jr. / MU

                                   Mihaela Moscaliuc / MU                                                                                

11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.  workshops

12:00-1:00 p.m.  lunch for registrants        

1:00-1:45 p.m.  reading:  Gabor Barabas / NJ Repertory Company

                                 Catherine Barnett / New School / NYU

                                 Michael Waters / MU               

2:00-2:45  talk and Q&A: Ron Mitchell, Editor, Southern Indiana Review

3:00-3:45 p.m.  reading: Kim Addonizo

4:00-5:00 p.m.  reading: festival participants

Ladies and Gentlemen…The Beatles!

ONLINE REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED. STANDING ROOM TICKETS WILL STILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR. Seated tickets for this event are currently sold out, but standing room tickets are still available. By 10:15 am, we will begin to seat “standing room” ticket holders in any empty seats.
 
This February will mark 50 years since the Beatles landed at the newly-renamed Kennedy Airport and days later performed live on the Ed Sullivan Show to a record setting 73 million people changing music and popular culture forever. Monmouth University and the Los Angeles-based GRAMMY Museum have partnered to commemorate the tremendous impact that the Fab Four had on American society with this day-long symposium featuring a keynote address, three panels and musical performances through the day.

Symposium Schedule

9:30 am     Registration
Musical Performance: Salvatore Boyd

10:00 am     Keynote Address/Opening Remarks 
Bob Santelli, Executive Director of the GRAMMY Museum
 
10:30-10:40 am – Student Music Performance: Justin Franco

10:40 – 12:00 pm     Student Panel
Featuring current students who have taken Dr. Kenneth Campbell’s First-Year Seminar course, “The Beatles.” In addition to sharing their own research on the Beatles, the student panelists will reflect on their introduction to the Beatles, the Beatles’ impact on their generation, and the impact of technology on their experience with the group.  

Moderator, Professor Kenneth Campbell 
Alison Abate, “The Long and Winding Road: The Beatles Through the Years” 
Timothy Kerner, “The Effects of Drugs on the Beatles and Their Music” 
Sarah Lewis, “My Music Experience: The Beatles and Abbey Road” 
Jessica Mentzel, “The Beatles: Past, Present, and Future” 

12:00 – 12:45 pm     Lunch
Video Presentation organized by Professor George Wurzbach 

Junior Beatle Band curated by the Lakehouse Music Academy
Boxed lunches available for purchase

12:45-12:55 pm – Student Music Performance: Alexa Mazurkiewicz
 
12:45 – 2:30 pm     Faculty Panel
Monmouth University faculty members will discuss their thoughts and research on the Beatles and technology, the impact of Motown on their early career, questions of identity surrounding the group, and the experience of the second generation of Beatles’ fans with the group.  

Moderator, Dean Stan Green
Kenneth Campbell, “Who were the Beatles?: More than “Just a Band Who Made It Very, Very Big?” 
Christopher DeRosa,”The Beatles in the Echo Boom.”
Aaron Furgason,“Beatles vs. the Record Labels: How Technology Impacted the Beatles and their Record Labels.”
Stuart Rosenberg
, “The Beatles Discography: A Review of their Studio Albums, 1964-1970″
 
Hettie Williams, “The Motown Formula and the Boy Band Craze in the Pivotal Year 1964”


2:30-2:40 pm – Musical Performance: Joe Rapolla

2:40-4:00 pm     Professional Panel 
Moderator, Bob Santelli
Doug Sulpy, author, the Complete Beatles Audio Guide, the 910’s Guide to Beatles Outtakes 
Bobby Bandiera, Guitarist with Bon Jovi, Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes 
Vini Lopez, Drummer with original E Street Band, Steelmill
Marc Muller, Musician who has recorded with Bruce Springsteen, Branford Marsalis and Kelly Clarkson, music director/multi-instrumentalist for Dead On Live, and Monmouth University Professor

Ongoing throughout the day – Brain on Beatles Project
The first 40 people who register for the symposium (SOLD OUT) will receive an audio postcard with a push button sound module that plays their brainwaves mapped to your favorite Beatles song – a one of a kind sound art piece. Innovative technology meets beautiful melodies as award winning media artist Andrew Demirjian provides a truly unique perspective on the Beatles music. With a five-minute visit, Prof. Demirjian will map your brain activity as you listen to your favorite Beatles song and then translate that brain data to musical notes – the piece provides a sonic snapshot, a self-portrait of your Brain on Beatles.

The symposium is free and open to the public, however advance registration is required
 

Light of Day Foundation presents: Alejandro Escovedo & the Sensitive Boys with Special Guest Amy Cook

lod Alejandro Escovedo is a roots rock/alternative country singer/songwriter from Austin, Texas. He began a career in the early 1980’s that spans 14 albums, thousands of live shows and hundreds of thousands of miles on the road forging an identity that is one with his muse and his music. Over a lifetime spent traversing the bridge between words and melody, he has ranged over an emotional depth that embraces all forms of genre and presentation, a resolute voice that weathers the emotional terrain of our lives, its celebrations and despairs, it’s land mines, blindsides, upheavals and beckoning distractions, in search of ultimate release and the healing truth of honesty. Sometimes it takes the form of barely contained rage, the rock of punk amid kneeled feedback; sometimes it caresses and soothes, a whispery harmony riding the air of a nightclub room, removed from amplification, within the audience. Alejandro has worked his musical magic a number of times at the Jersey Shore, at the legendary Stone Pony, at the Count Basie Theatre and at the Paramount Theater headlining the Light of Day Festival in Asbury Park where he was joined by his friends Willie Nile, Joe Grushecky, Jesse Malin and Bruce Springsteen. Nationally syndicated radio shows such as Little Steven Van Zandt’s Underground Garage continue to give prominent attention to Escovedo and his music, continuing to play songs such as  “Silver Cloud” from his 2010 album Street Songs of Love as well as music from his most recent record 2012’s Big Station. His family boasts several professional musicians including his niece, drummer/percussionist Sheila E.  With Special Guest Amy Cook.

Tickets on sale now online, by phone and in person at the Pollak Theatre and MAC Box Offices.
Visit lightofday.org for more information.

Winter Commencement

Monmouth University will hold Winter Commencement on Friday, January 17, 2014, at 1:30 p.m. on campus in the Multipurpose Activity Center (MAC). Students who have completed their degree requirements in the Summer or Fall 2013 semesters will be recognized at this time.

Doors to the MAC will open at 12 p.m. on Commencement Day.

Students are asked to be at the student lineup in Boylan Gymnasium no later than 12:45 p.m. on Commencement Day. Please enter through the Fitness Center.

Guests are requested to be seated by 1 p.m.

Live Video will be available online beginning at 1:30 p.m.

33rd Annual Black Maria Film and Video Festival

The films that become the centerpiece of the Black Maria Film and Video Festival honor the vision of Thomas Edison, New Jersey inventor and creator of the motion picture.  It was his New Jersey studio, the world’s first, which he called the “black maria” (pronounced “mariah”) after which the festival is named.  The cutting edge, cross-genre work that makes up the festival’s touring program, has been traveling across the country every year for decades.
 
Black Maria focuses on diverse short films – narrative, experimental, animation, and documentary – including those which address issues and struggles within contemporary society such as the environment, public health, race and class, family, sustainability, and much more. These exceptional works ranging from comedy to drama to the exploration of pure form in film and video are not sidebars to feature length films, they are the heart and soul of the festival. The program is free and all are welcome. Works which will be screened are unrated; some of the content is sophisticated and might not be suited to younger audiences.

Films:
A Place of Spirit – Jury’s Choice
6.5 min. by Natalie Conn and Jay Weichun, Brooklyn, NY
This is the story of Andrea Phillips, a Staten Island based artist, facing eviction from her home after 44 years.  Rather than center itself around the policy issues associated with Andrea’s eviction, “A Place of Spirit” focuses on Andrea’s emotional and spiritual relationship to her eccentric, unique and uncommon home.

Something Like Whales – Jury’s Choice

5 min. by Nora Sweeney, Val Verde, CA.
In a dying industrial neighborhood in Cincinnati, Ohio, the Queensgate Train Yard pulses with life. A local worker describes the haunting sound emanating from the yard as ‘something like whales.’  This poetical film was shot in part with a camera obscura.

For The Birds – You Be the Judge: Peoples’ Choice Award
14 min. by Tara Atashgah, Santa Monica, CA.
Inspired by a true story, “For The Birds” follows a young Iranian girl as she is taken to the gallows to be hanged, having been accused of adultery. In her final moments, she imagines her fate in the hands of the surrounding townspeople.

Close the Lid, Gently: A Home Document Scan – Jury’s Choice

5.5 min. by Ariana Gerstein, Barton, NY.
A video made entirely from two home desktop scanners – one a photo scanner, the other a refurbished low-end document scanner. Each has its own texture and sees the domestic environment in its own particular way, one scan at a time. This piece deals with the deliberate misuse/re-purposing of commercial image producing machines for a slow, individual, low tech, approach to the motion picture making process.

The Apothecary – Jury’s Choice

17 min. by Helen Hood Scheer, Palo Alto, CA.
A moving portrait of beloved druggist, Don Colcord, in a rural Colorado outpost. Don is a man who operates the only pharmacy within 4,000 square miles.  He navigates a profound divide between his public persona and his personal life.  To the community, he is jovial and heroic.  At home, he is impotent and isolated due to his wife’s disability.  “The Apothecary” explores notions of individual duty and obligation in the face of privately held grief and ambivalence.

Wise Choice or Lucky Guess – Directors’ Choice
3.5 min. by Ellen Raines, Fox Point, WI.
A recently deceased man has to make a choice between heaven and hell, while sitting on an escalator.

Rehearsal – Directors’ Choice

11 min. by Tom Rosenberg, Austin, TX.

Natalie Diaz

Native American poet Natalie Diaz will be in residence at Monmouth University on Thursday, April 17 and Friday, April 18th, 2014. 

 On Thursday, 17th, at 11:00 a.m., she will speak about the language revitalization program at Fort Mojave, her home reservation, where she works with the last Elder speakers of the Mojave language. At 3:00 p.m. she will conduct a poetry workshop with students and community members. At 4:30 p.m. she will read her poems.

On Friday, 18th, Natalie Diaz will participate in the afternoon launch of The Monmouth Review, the student-edited literary and arts journal, outside Wilson Hall. 

 Natalie Diaz grew up in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles, California, on the banks of the Colorado River. She is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Community. 

Her poems have appeared in The North American Review, The Southeast Review, Prairie Schooner, Spillway, Best New Poets 2007, The Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses, and other literary journals and anthologies. Her book, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2012. 

Her book will be available for purchase and signing at the poetry reading. 

This residency is co-sponsored by the West Branch Arts Council and the Department of English.