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The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee

Book by Rachel Sheinkin
Conceived by Rebecca Feldman
Additional Material by Jay Reiss
Music and Lyrics by William Finn

Six young people in the throes of puberty, overseen by grown-ups who barely managed to escape childhood themselves, learn that winning isn’t everything and that losing doesn’t necessarily make you a loser.

THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE is a hilarious tale of overachievers’ angst chronicling the experience of six adolescent outsiders vying for the spelling championship of a lifetime. The show’s Tony Award winning creative team has created the unlikeliest of hit musicals about the unlikeliest of heroes: a quirky yet charming cast of outsiders for whom a spelling bee is the one place where they can stand out and fit in at the same time.

Scapino

Scapino, by director Frank Dunlop and actor Jim
Dale, is an outrageous comedy adapted “a long way off from Moliere” but
exhibiting the classic elements of the French master and the Italian
“commedia d’ell arte.” Scapino is the wily servant who twists the rules
to trick his master’s father into allowing him to marry the girl of his
dreams while the waiters, waitresses and customers of a seaside
restaurant sing parodies of “O Solo Mio” and the names of menu items
like “veal scallopine.”

Preview: June 23 at 8 p.m.

Opening Night: June 24 at 8 p.m.

Performances: June 25, 29 and 30, July 1, 2, 6, 7, 8 and 9 at 8 p.m.; June 26, July 3 and 10 at 7 p.m.

Cost: Preview night – Adult/Senior $20; Student $10; June 24 through July 10 – Adult $35; Senior $30; Student $15

Molly Sweeny

Molly Sweeny is by the prize-winning Irish playwright, Brian Friel (Dancing at Lughnasa, Translations).
It is the story of Molly Sweeny, a woman who has been blind since
childhood, who undergoes an operation to restore her vision. Based
loosely on an essay by Oliver Saks (Awakenings), the tale is told by Molly, her husband, and the doctor.

Preview: July 14 at 8 p.m.

Opening Night: July 15 at 8 p.m.

Performances: July 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 27, 28, 29, and 30 at 8 p.m.; July 17, 24 and 31 at 7 p.m.

Cost: Preview night – Adult/Senior $15; Student $10; July 15 through July 31 – Adult $30; Senior $22; Student $15

Teddy and Alice

Thursdays – Saturdays at 8 p.m
Sundays at 7 p.m.
Friday matinee at 2 p.m.

Book by Jerome Alden; Music by John Phillip Sousa; Lyrics by Hal Hackady Adaptations and Original Music by Richard Kapp
“I
can do one of two things,” says Teddy Roosevelt at the top of “Teddy
& Alice,” “I can either be President of the United States or I can
control Alice. I cannot possibly do both!” The battle of wills between
the great American President and his free-spirited daughter provides a
spectacular double-star turn in this high-stepping, flag-waving and
heart-warming family drama, set to the immortal strains of John Philip
Sousa.

Bang, Bang, You’re Dead and the Gaggle

Shadow Lawn Theatre and the Actor’s Playground
present 

“Bang, Bang, You’re Dead”

Friday and Saturday, July
18 and 19 at 7 p.m.


“The Gaggle” by Ralph Colombino

Sunday, July 20th at 2:00 p.m., 3:30 p.m. and 5 p.m.

Bang Bang You’re Dead is a one-act play written by
William Mastrosimone.
Josh’s life is a
never-ending cycle of bullying and self-loathing until he makes a decision that
destroys his life and the lives of others. He’s already in jail, but can he
face the real consequences? After a school shooting, the ghosts of five
victims demand answers. In this moving drama, Josh’s life is a portrait of
bullying, self-loathing and suicidal thoughts. What happens when he realizes
the future he stole from the victims and himself? 
  

The
Mini Misfits’ Anti Bullying play, The Gaggle follows the story of a very unique and
empowered girl named Phoebe. She is new to Guggenheim Academy and
immediately has to deal with the meanest girl who ever lived, a bully
named Stacey, not to mention her group of friends who call themselves
The Gaggle. Stacey and her crew decide that they are going to bully the
new girl, but little do they know what they are up against. Phoebe
defends herself with wit, cunning, and guile. Guggenheim Academy would
never be the same again. Truthfully acted, wonderfully written, and
extremely relatable to its audience, The Gaggle is entertaining and
profoundly effective in the ongoing battle with bullying.

BIG: THE MUSICAL

A frustrated adolescent magically becomes an adult, discovering life is not simply child’s play.

The classic 1987 motion picture fantasy bursts onto the stage in the unforgettable theatrical experience, Big The Musical. Featuring a witty, moving, and insightful book by John Weidman (Assassins, Pacific Overtures, Road Show) and a dazzling, energetic, heartfelt, contemporary score by David Shire and Richard Maltby, Jr. (Baby, Closer Than Ever, Starting Here, Starting Now) Big is a perfect show for audiences of all ages!

Josh Baskin is sick of being an awkward kid. At a carnival, he makes a wish to the Zoltar machine to become “big”. To his shock, his wish is granted. After an understandably awkward beginning, Josh is forced to do “adult” things like getting a job and a girlfriend. In the end he discovers there’s much more to being an adult than he’s bargained for, and learns we must all grow up at our own pace, in our own time.

Wednesdays through Saturdays, July 8 – July 25 at 8 pm with matinees on Fridays at 3 pm
To order tickets by phone call the Box Office at 732.263.6889

Big, The Musical Is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI).
All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI.
421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019
Phone: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684
www.MTIShows.com

ALWAYS, PATSY CLINE

ALL REMAINING PERFORMANCES ARE SOLD OUT.

  July 6-9 and July 13-16 at 8 PM with Friday matinees at 2 PM on July 8 and 15
For the box office call 732.263.6889
 
Before Loretta and before Dolly, there was Patsy – Patsy Cline, whose hits like “Crazy” and “Sweet Dreams” heralded the cross-over of country music and pop. This summer, Shadow Lawn Stage, the professional theatre in residence at Monmouth University, will present Ted Swindley’s ode to her: Always, Patsy Cline.

The show tells Patsy’s story through the eyes and words of Louise Seger, a Texas housewife who starts out as a Patsy fan, becomes a pen pal, and then blossoms into an incredible friendship. 

Starring as Patsy is Reagan Richards,
a renowned singer in her own right, who has sung with music greats such as Les
Paul, Darlene Love, Ben E. King, Joan Jett, David Gray, Cheap Trick & many
others. She is part of Williams Honor, the Jersey Shore’s first modern country
duo, with multi-instrumentalist Gordon Brown. She begins work as Patsy in
between her national radio tour, where she supporting their single, “Send
It To Me,” with performances all over the country celebrating the recent
release of their self-titled CD. Under the music direction of George Wurzbach –
formerly of the folk group Modern Man and a member of the Monmouth faculty –
Ms. Richards will sing many of the Patsy Cline standards, including “I Fall To
Pieces”, “Walking After Midnight” and 27 other tunes.

Under the direction of Maurice J. Moran, the role of Louise will be played by Katrina Ferguson, returning to Shadow Lawn after acclaimed performances in The Au Pair Man and Molly Sweeney. Ms. Ferguson recently won the Best Actress award at the Dorset Theatre Festival for her role of Eleanor of Aquitaine in Lion In Winter. Louise tells her story by conjuring memories of where and when she fell in love with Cline’s music: listening to the radio in her kitchen, meeting her at a local country bar, and seeing her live on stage with a band of country musicians.

You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown

Dates: 6/23: 2pm & 8pm;  6/24: 2pm & 8pm;  6/25: 3pm;  6/30: 2pm & 8pm;  7/1: 2pm & 8pm; 7/2: 3pm

Shadow Lawn Stage, the professional theatre of Monmouth University, will present the 50th anniversary production of the enchanting musical, You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown this June with 10 performances at the historic Woods Theatre on the university’s campus. Based on the famed comic strip “Peanuts” by Charles Schulz, the musical tells the story of some typical days in the life of Charlie Brown. From running after the school bus to spying the cute little red-haired girl at lunch, Charlie deals with the fun and frustrations of life with his friends Lucy, Linus and Schroeder; his kid sister Sally; and his faithful companion, Snoopy. The original production featured Gary Burghoff (Radar in the MASH series). The 1999 revival won 2 Tony Awards – for Roger Bart as Snoopy and Kristen Chenoweth as Sally –  and the Drama Desk award for “Best Revival of a Musical”.

The songs of the show, written by Clark Gesner, reveal the dreams and goals of the characters: Lucy explores her feelings for Schroeder while he plays Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” (“it’s always been my dream that I’d marry a man that plays the piano”); Linus sings and dances with his security blanket in “My Blanket and Me”, and even Snoopy sings the praises of his favorite time of day in “Suppertime!”  For the revival, Andrew Lippa added a new song that had Sally searching for “A New Philosophy” (is it “Why are you telling me?” or “I can’t stand it!”?)  As the day comes to a close, the whole gang reflects on the things that bring them “Happiness”.
Directed by Maurice J. Moran, the Shadow Lawn production features a range of actors: professional members of Actors’ Equity Association, MU students and alumni, and new rising stars.

The Fantasticks

The longest-running show in Off Broadway history, the 1960 musical by the songwriting team of Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones played for more than four decades and over 17,000 performances at the intimate Sullivan Street Playhouse in Greenwich Village – winning a special Tony Award.

The Fantasticks is a funny and romantic musical about a boy, a girl, and their two fathers who try to keep them apart. The narrator, El Gallo, asks the audience to use their imagination and follow him into a world of moonlight and magic. The boy and the girl fall in love, grow apart and finally find their way back to each other after realizing the truth in El Gallo’s words that, “without a hurt, the heart is hollow.” (source MTI website)

 

For this summer-season production of a history-making landmark musical, producer Sheri Anderson and director Michael Perreca have made a direct connection to the show’s rich history, by casting two veterans of the show’s legendary New York run. Starring as El Gallo, the bandit-for-hire who serves as the show’s narrator, is David Edwards, who played the role for more than 500 performances at Sullivan Street, and who was featured in the 2003 documentary Try to Remember: The Fantasticks. Fellow Off Broadway cast member J.C. Hoyt returns to the role of Henry, the Old Actor who assists the bandit in an elaborate ruse designed to unite the young neighbors Matt (“The Boy”) and Luisa (“The Girl”).

 

Appearing respectively as Matt and Luisa are Keenan Buckley and Sarah Beth Andrews, with Brett Lowell and Felipe Gorostiza as the “feuding” fathers Bellamy and Hucklebee. The cast is completed by a pair of alumni from Monmouth’s Department of Music and Theater Arts, Brandon M. Wiener (Mortimer) and Evan Kudish (The Mute), with those roles understudied by Monmouth students Christian Lombino and Erin Clemente.

 

Featuring choreography by Janine Molinari and musical direction by Michael Gilch, The Fantasticks is a timeless tale of both romance and reality, told with a bracing humor and a sense of stage magic that never goes out of style.

The Fantasticks

The longest-running show in Off Broadway history, the 1960 musical by the songwriting team of Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones played for more than four decades and over 17,000 performances at the intimate Sullivan Street Playhouse in Greenwich Village – winning a special Tony Award.

The Fantasticks is a funny and romantic musical about a boy, a girl, and their two fathers who try to keep them apart. The narrator, El Gallo, asks the audience to use their imagination and follow him into a world of moonlight and magic. The boy and the girl fall in love, grow apart and finally find their way back to each other after realizing the truth in El Gallo’s words that, “without a hurt, the heart is hollow.” (source MTI website)

 

For this summer-season production of a history-making landmark musical, producer Sheri Anderson and director Michael Perreca have made a direct connection to the show’s rich history, by casting two veterans of the show’s legendary New York run. Starring as El Gallo, the bandit-for-hire who serves as the show’s narrator, is David Edwards, who played the role for more than 500 performances at Sullivan Street, and who was featured in the 2003 documentary Try to Remember: The Fantasticks. Fellow Off Broadway cast member J.C. Hoyt returns to the role of Henry, the Old Actor who assists the bandit in an elaborate ruse designed to unite the young neighbors Matt (“The Boy”) and Luisa (“The Girl”).

 

Appearing respectively as Matt and Luisa are Keenan Buckley and Sarah Beth Andrews, with Brett Lowell and Felipe Gorostiza as the “feuding” fathers Bellamy and Hucklebee. The cast is completed by a pair of alumni from Monmouth’s Department of Music and Theater Arts, Brandon M. Wiener (Mortimer) and Evan Kudish (The Mute), with those roles understudied by Monmouth students Christian Lombino and Erin Clemente.

 

Featuring choreography by Janine Molinari and musical direction by Michael Gilch, The Fantasticks is a timeless tale of both romance and reality, told with a bracing humor and a sense of stage magic that never goes out of style.