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This is a current list of articles from 2013. Use the search features above to find more.


Volume: 9
Issue: 1
Year of Publication: 2013
Type of Content: Article

Containing the Monster: The Golem in Expressionist Film and Theater
Mia Spiro, University of Glasgow
The Jewish legend of the Golem – a mythic being created by rabbis and mystics versed in Kabbalah and the secrets of creation – has long held an intense fascination for writers and artists in Western culture. Jewish parables relating to the Golem date back to the fourth or fifth centuries; throughout the Middle Ages and into the Romantic era the legend continued to transform in power and scope.

Volume: 9
Issue: 1
Year of Publication: 2013
Type of Content: Article

Modernist Yiddish Aesthetics, I. L. Peretz’s Middlebrow Yiddish Poetics,and the Place of Yehoash in Modernist and Middlebrow Literary History
Michael T. Williamson, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Yehoash (the pen name for Solomon Bloomgarden, 1870-1927) was a revered Yiddish poet during the interwar period, the Holocaust, and the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust. This essay establishes a critical methodology for recovering the work of this important Jewish poet.

Volume: 9
Issue: 1
Year of Publication: 2013
Type of Content: Article

“Sideways” Feminism: Rebecca West and the Saturday Evening Post, 1928
Margaret D. Stetz, University of Delaware
Military leaders and progressives move forwards; cowards and conservatives move backwards. Who or what moves sideways? Only sinister creatures — snakes and spiders, things that slither or creep — and, according to Rebecca West, some women.

Volume: 9
Issue: 1
Year of Publication: 2013
Type of Content: Article

“Shrill small voices ... drowned out by the general trumpetings of praise”: The Reception of Noël Coward’s Cavalcade
Rebecca Cameron, DePaul University
When Virginia Woolf first met Noël Coward at one of Sybil Colefax’s famous social gatherings in 1928, she was thoroughly charmed: she praised him as “a miracle, a prodigy” and, after seeing his hit revue, This Year of Grace, wrote a letter enthusiastically encouraging him to try his hand at novels that would “put these cautious, creeping novels that one has to read silently in an arm chair deep, deep in the shade” (Letters 3: 478). By 1934, she was referring to him in her letters as “Noël Coward whose works I despise” (Letters 5: 273) and dismissing his gifts in her diary as “all out of the 6d box at Woolworth’s. . . . Nothing there: but the heroic beating” (Diary 4: 259).

Volume: 9
Issue: 1
Year of Publication: 2013
Type of Content: Article

Defining Detective Fiction in Interwar Britain
Victoria Stewart, University of Leicester
In an autobiographical anecdote, the British novelist Jeanette Winterson describes how she was awakened to literature after being sent to the public library to collect some books for her adoptive mother, who, apart from religious tracts, read only detective fiction. This story is framed as, in part, a paean to Britain’s continually under-threat public library services, a reminder that they are not just the providers of a “weekly haul” of detective stories for readers like Mrs Winterson (Winterson), but can also introduce a literature-deprived youngster like Jeanette to high culture.

Volume: 9
Issue: 1
Year of Publication: 2013
Type of Content: Article

Baziotes, Surrealism, and Boxing: “Life in a Squared Ring”
Mona Hadler, CUNY, Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center
The boxer, as a cultural icon who stands at the center of debates on class, race, politics and sexuality, has held a seemingly endless fascination for artists and writers from ancient times to the present. Our story here dates to the early forties when Surrealist writers turned their attention to a fierce and flamboyant Senegalese boxer called Battling Siki, at the moment when a young boxer artist, William Baziotes, fell under their orb in New York City.