Skip to main content
COVID-19 Update: University offices are open but being staffed remotely. Classes will be conducted remotely for all summer sessions.

Student Activities

I Dream of … a Great Advisor … And Tips to Maintain a Good Relationship

  • Sit down and discuss the role of the advisor in the organization with everyone. Every student leader will have a different level of support from the advisor. It is vital to the strength of the advisor/organization relationship that you establish this level of involvement as early as possible. No involvement by the advisor is NOT an option, but having a “behind the scenes” approach is very acceptable. Remember that you need them; it’s better to have them in your corner earlier than later. Always keep the advisor informed of meetings and activities, and be honest.
  • Invite them to all of your meetings. Try to set meeting times that are good for your organization members and advisor. Host the meetings at a decent hour and in an accessible location. Late evenings are often hard for advisors who have to go home and come back to campus. If this is not possible, ask that your advisor come to a meeting once a month. This is the best way to guarantee a high level of commitment by your advisor. By participating in the meetings, the advisor will know all the background information and can provide valuable insight early in the process.
  • Schedule weekly, one-on-one meetings with your advisor. This will provide valuable mentoring time, as well as an opportunity to work out logistics and policy issues before heading off to an organizational meeting. This is a great time to establish the agenda for the next meeting and discuss any personnel or financial issues the organization may be dealing with. This weekly meeting will help keep you organized and will help the advisor to feel that they know what is going on with the organization. This meeting may include other officers too.
  • Sit down with your advisor and talk about proposed activities. Let them know what they can help you with. Don’t wait until the last minute before going to talk with your advisor. If you are hosting an event, you must have an advisor present for the entire event. Please make sure your advisor will be available before you commit to an event.
  • It may seem obvious, but make sure to remind your advisor to be at all your events. Since many advisors have families, invite the families as well. Having your advisor at an event is not only required, but can be beneficial in case an issue arises, whether with the venue or the artist. Your advisor will be better apt to handle such crises and it will take the pressure off of you. It is also nice to have your advisor see firsthand how all of the hard work has paid off.
  • In addition to providing copies of your organization agendas and minutes to your members, make sure that you route one to your advisor. This will allow for your advisor to keep a complete file of information on the club. It will also provide a great reference tool for issues that may arise down the road. At the very least, it is one more person who knows what went on in case organization files are lost during leadership transitions. Do things in a timely manner; don’t expect your advisor to be able to drop everything to help you with a last minute request. Don’t ask the advisor to do work that you should do for yourself.
  • Involve your advisor in rewrites of your organizational constitution or charter. This will make your advisor a very valuable resource down the road. Knowing where the organization started and where it is headed will provide legitimacy to how the organization operates. Encourage advisors to attend advisor roundtables, workshops, and other leadership opportunities with you and the members of your group.
  • Since your advisor has played a larger role in the organization and a working relationship exists between the leaders of the organization and the advisor, it is important to include your advisor in the selection/election process of new leaders. Your advisor will provide an objective viewpoint when it comes to putting the most qualified people into leadership roles. Use it!
  • Do fun stuff with your advisor. Go to conferences, go out for dinner, invite them to your recitals or athletic matches and go shopping for prizes and supplies together. Include your advisor in the fun and games that make being part of the organization worth it. Keep in mind that your advisor volunteered for this position because they wanted to help you.
  • Recognize your advisor. Advisors do not get paid extra for their work with your organization, though for some, it is part of their job description. You need to make sure you let them know that you value their involvement. Present them with an award at the end of the school year. Make sure that you order them the latest organization T-shirt. Write an article in the school paper about how great your advisor is. Write a letter to their supervisor letting them know about the important role this person plays in the success of your organization (make sure to send one to your advisor as well). Send them a card on Bosses Day or just a quick note to say thanks for all they do. Advisors do not get paid for their time. Keeping them informed and saying “thank you” for their help goes a long way in keeping a good advisor for your organization. The littlest things mean the world to your advisor. Most of them do the job because of you. Remember that.

How to Obtain or Change Your Club Advisor

All student clubs are required to have a faculty or staff advisor employed by Monmouth University. Though not encouraged for longevity or ease of access reasons, part-time employees and adjunct faculty are allowed to serve as club advisors. If you currently have an advisor, but would like to switch advisors we recommend that you first inform your current advisor of your desire for a new advisor and once a new advisor has been identified, please notify the Office of Student Activities of the change.

Student organizations needing help finding an advisor should visit the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations. The Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations will contact faculty and staff members to determine their interest in advising a student organization. The Student Activities staff encourages the student organization officers to make an appointment with the potential advisor. This gives the group the chance to determine if the person is right for the organization and gives the potential advisor the chance to see if the organization is right for him or her to advise. If both parties agree, a new roster with the new advisor’s information must be completed and turned in to the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations.

Responsibilities of an Advisor

Advisors of campus organizations allow the students the opportunity to develop organizational and leadership skills. Students can complement their educational objectives through important out-of-class activities that allow them the chance to exercise basic freedoms and learn about human behavior. In support of these objectives, it is important that persons with experience in organizations be available to assist students in their organizational endeavors. While the range of student activities and group purposes are diverse, advisors can be a valuable resource to the organization in terms of help with procedural matters, college regulations and policies, and financial concerns. Attaining advisors who are committed to student learning through out-of-class activities is crucial. Recognized student organizations are required to have an advisor. All advisors should be Monmouth University faculty or staff members. It is important that advisors understand the responsibilities involved before making a commitment to a student group. These responsibilities include:

  1. Assist officers in understanding their duties, developing programs and plans, organizing projects and making appropriate transitions.
  2. Be a resource for the students especially in regard to understanding college policies, regulations and services.
  3. Advisors for Fraternities and Sororities should be familiar with the Fraternity and Sorority Life Handbook and guidelines in addition to the Student Organization Handbook.
  4. Club Sport advisors should be familiar with the Club Sport Handbook guidelines in addition to the Student Organization Handbook.
  5. Attend meetings and/or arrange a separate meeting with E-Board.
  6. Assist organization in determining goals and encourage them to determine ways to meet them.
  7. Advise and attend organization events.
  8. If applicable, sign off on club expenditures for use of SGA granted funds.
  9. See that continuity of the organization is preserved through a constitution, minutes, files and traditions.
  10. Articulate campus policies and procedures and help organization understand them.
  11. If the organization is a part of a national organization be familiar with their policies, procedures, and risk management guidelines.
  12. Maintain the ability to address organization issues as they arise each year.
  13. Assist students in managing conflict that may occur in the organization.
  14. Be generally available to assist the organization.
  15. Travel with organization, if possible, for conferences or trips.
  16. Consult with other appropriate University offices when problems arise with the student organization.
  17. Recognize that as a student organization advisor, you are classified as a Campus Security Authority. See Section “Advisor responsibilities under Clery Act (Crime and Statistics)”.
  18. Recognize that as an employee of the University, you are a Responsible Employee. See Section “Title IX-Responsible Employees”.
  19. Refer to the “Advisor’s Frequently Asked Questions” in the Student Organization Handbook or the Clubs and Organization Adviser Information Page on the portal for more information.
  20. Submit work orders and requests (help desk, facilities, set up, police, etc.) as needed.
  21. Work with the Office of Student Activities to obtain contracts and vendor information in time for the event. Remember students may not commit to a contract. Student organization advisors and students are not permitted to sign contracts. All contracts must be reviewed by the University’s Office of the General Counsel prior to being signed by the Vice President for Student Life & Leadership Engagement.
  22. Consult with the Director of Compliance/Risk Manager and the Office of the General Counsel regarding potential risks to individuals participating in organization activities and events.
  23. Consultant with the Director of Compliance/Risk Manager regarding any insurance questions and issues.

Advisers are given an opportunity to attend meetings/workshops sponsored by the Office of Student Activities or to set up a separate meeting to learn about guidelines and to have questions answered. Fraternity and sorority advisors may contact the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life to  learn more about the guidelines for those organizations, or attend meetings sponsored by the office. Sport Club advisors may contact the Coordinator in the Athletics Department for more information on helping their clubs.

Advisor’s Frequently Asked Questions

Advisors frequently ask our department questions about student club responsibilities and opportunities. Student Activities has put together this guide sheet, which lists a number of the more common questions, asked by advisors.

1. “As an advisor, do I need to attend all of the club’s meetings and events?”
Advisors need to be active participants in a club’s regular activities and events. They help guide the organization and in many cases, play a large role in the organization’s success. The advisor must be present for all events that are sponsored by the club. Advisors should make every effort to find meeting times that will make it possible for the club to meet with her/him. In the event you are not able to find a time that is suitable for the entire organization, you may want to set up an executive board meeting time with just the officers of the organization.

2. “My organization is planning a trip off campus; what do I need to know?”
Please talk to the Office of Student Activities before anything is booked. See the link regarding Student Organization Travel Guidelines and Advisor Responsibilities for more information and guidelines.

3. “My organization wants to hold a large event and possibly open it up to the general public; what should I consider?”
Requirements to hold large events (concerts, lectures, dances, dinners, festivals, etc.) vary depending on the nature of the event. However, all proposed events need to be reviewed by the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations and approved by the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement. There are items that the Office of Student Activities suggests you consider when planning large events include the following: catering requirements, audio/video needs, campus police and/or security, building set-ups, performer/entertainer fees and contracts, insurance, the sale of alcohol, and publicity on campus. If your organization is planning a large event, take a few minutes to make an appointment to see the Director of Student Activities and Student Center Operations before finalizing any commitments with vendors or performers. It is best to plan large events at least a semester in advance. Any and all contracts must be reviewed by the Office of the General Counsel and signed by the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement.

4. “Our club wants to hire a performer/entertainer for an event, what should I do?”
Advisors should make sure that the organization has enough funding to cover event-related expenses prior to making any commitments with performers, agents or vendors. Most performers/entertainers will require a fee for their appearance. In order for any entertainer to be paid, a contract must be prepared by the Office of the General Counsel and signed by the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement. We must also have a W-9 (tax form) on file for the person or business that will be paid. Only the advisor is permitted to request a contract from a performer/agency. All contracts must be first reviewed by the University’s Office of the General Counsel and then signed by the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement. The Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations is well versed in dealing with performance agreements/contracts and is always willing to assist an organization with such matters. A good rule of thumb is to give yourself at least a 45-day cushion prior to the intended event. Contracts need to be reviewed, signed and check(s) need to be cut. This process may take a minimum of four to five weeks. Contracts should be submitted to the Office of the General Counsel via email: gccontractsubmission@monmouth.edu. Any assumption of risk or waiver required by a venue, vendor, or performer should be reviewed by the Office of the General Counsel.

5. “How do I go about reserving rooms and equipment on campus?”
Central Scheduling (located in Conference Services and Special Events) is responsible for all non-academic related room reservations and is located on the first floor of the Rebecca Stafford Student Center. The Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations must first review any event-type activity before a room can be reserved. Organizations that have submitted a current roster and have a constitution on file are eligible to book rooms and reserve equipment on campus. When reserving a room, let Central Scheduling know if you have special set-up needs such as: the number of people attending, food that may be served, or audio/video needs. If you need to reserve audio and/or video equipment, requests can be made through the help desk and must be done by an advisor.

6. “Who should I speak to about ordering food and/or alcohol for an event?”
Gourmet Dining (ext. 5678 – off campus: 732-263-5608/9) has the exclusive right to provide food on campus and should always be your first contact for catering needs. They are a great resource in planning a food-related event on campus. No organization may bring in any food from outside vendors without advance permission from Gourmet Dining. If your organization wishes to bring in another caterer, Gourmet Dining must first be consulted to approve your request in writing. If outside food is going to be used for an event there must be a contract with the vendor and certain health certificates must be provide by the vendor. Please contact the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations to start this process at least six weeks in advance.

The University has a contract for beverage services with Coca-Cola. If you prefer to bring in your own non-alcoholic drinks, permission must be granted by the Office of the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement. Any organization that wishes to have alcohol at an event must request a special event alcohol permit from the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement. All groups must have this request submitted in writing no less than 30 day prior to the intended event. Alcohol-related events must abide by New Jersey regulations as set forth by the Division of Alcohol Beverage Control as well as University policy related to the service of alcohol. Alcohol-related events will have a significant impact on the cost of your event. In cases where the Vice President has approved such an event, plan on having to pay for bartenders, the cost of the alcohol, security, etc. These costs should be added to your overall expenses.

Food trucks – If your group would like to bring a food truck to campus please see the Assistant Director of Student Activities 90 days in advance of the event. They will assist you with the process which includes obtaining a permit, insurance and sanitary inspection reports.

7. “What are some of the ways our organization can advertise events on campus?”
Clubs will typically develop their own publicity, which may be distributed across campus. When advertising in the Rebecca Stafford Student Center and in academic buildings, you always need to have flyers, posters, approved by the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations. The Rebecca Stafford Student Center staff will post a maximum of four (4) related publicity documents. Flyers should be brought to the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations in order to get approval. It is best to bring your publicity during normal work hours, Monday through Friday 8:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. If your organization wishes to publicize in the residence halls, that information should be taken to Pinewood Hall, the Office of Residential Life. The Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations has on file the University’s current “Advertising, Solicitation and Posting Regulations in Public Areas” information. In the RSSC Café and in the hallway there are TVs that can showcase any organization’s flyer. To have your organization’s flyer on a TV please email activities@monmouth.edu in JPG format. Organizations may also reserve and utilize the outside window on the Student Center patio, or the blacktop pathway in front of the Student Center Patio. Students need to reserve these spaces, ensure no mess is left behind, and clean up after the event. Other resources available to clubs include The Outlook 732-571-3481, WMCX radio 732-571-3482, the electronic billboards or HAWK TV 732-263-5274.

8. “How do I find out about getting funding for our organization?”
If your organization collects dues, they are not eligible to receive an annual budget from SGA. Clubs that have been recognized for at least one full semester are open to the general Monmouth student population, and who have submitted a current roster and constitution may apply for an annual budget. By the middle of the Fall semester, all recognized clubs will receive budget-related information. It is the club’s responsibility to submit a proper budget and to attend all budget-related meetings with SGA. Failure to do so may negatively impact a club’s opportunity to receive an annual budget. If an organization does not receive an annual budget, the club is still eligible to apply for special event funding through SGA. For further information, contact the SGA Finance Committee at (732)923-4714. Clubs are also encouraged to pursue co-sponsorships with other organizations when planning events or activities.

9. “What are some of the common benefits for recognized clubs and organizations?”
Besides the opportunity many clubs and organizations have to request a budget from SGA, recognized groups are also eligible to reserve rooms, vending tables and equipment on campus. Groups not eligible for a SGA annual budget can still apply for Travel Event Funding, or Special
Event Funding.

Recognized groups may also apply for one of the four co-sponsorship programs sponsored through the Office of Student Activities to help fund a program or activity.

Clubs may also have one of the mailboxes that are located within the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations (fraternity and sorority mailboxes are located in the Fraternity and Sorority Lounge). Please note that mailboxes should be checked two to three times a week.
Organizations that fail to do so will lose such privilege.

All recognized clubs are eligible to open a campus club account that can be used to deposit fundraised money, event proceeds, and to be used to pay club bills. No club or organization is permitted to have any type of off-campus account, with the exception of fraternities and sororities.

Recognized groups may reserve a room for an event through the Office of Student Activities. While this meeting is required to host an event, while there the organization leaders learn how to make sure their event has everything it needs including sound, lights, custodians, etc.

Recognized groups may utilize the electronic sign board and the TV screens to advertise events.

Vending tables may be utilized for fundraising efforts of recognized clubs and organizations. Contact the Office of Student Activities to inquire about reserving a table.

For more information about this guide or Monmouth’s student clubs and organizations, please feel free to contact the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations at 732-571-3586 or
activities@monmouth.edu. You may also visit us at our office on the second floor of the Student Center.

Student Organization Travel Checklist

If your organization will be utilizing your SGA granted budget, fundraised money in a University account, or received special Travel Funding from SGA for a travel program, please review the following Travel Checklist. Review the “Information for All” section, and then review the section(s) that pertains to the type of trip you are planning. Please note, there is also a section on advisor responsibilities when assisting a group with a trip.

CLUB INFORMATION
Today’s Date: ______________________________________
Club Name: ________________________________________
Club President:______________________
Contact Phone Number: ______________________________
Advisor: _________________________
Destination: ________________________________________
Date(s) of Travel: ____________________

INFORMATION FOR ALL

⬜ If your trip is out of the country, please realize that additional documentation will be needed such as enrollment in travel accident insurance and travel ID cards.

⬜ First, obtain approval for your travel from the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations. It is recommended that this be done a minimum of 45 days prior to the planned date of travel.

⬜ The Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations will inform you if an Assumption of Risk form is required for each attendee. Either The Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations or the Advisor must retain the Assumption of Risk Form for seven years from the date of the activity. (Originals are not required to be retained as long as Advisor retains a scanned pdf signed copy in a permanent shared drive or other document retention database.)

⬜ Determine your mode of transportation. It is preferred that groups utilize public transportation or a rented bus/vehicle with a professional driver. In the absence of a professional driver, the club/organization advisor must be approved by the Office of Compliance to drive the rented vehicle. The advisor must provide a copy of their driver’s license to the Director of Compliance/Risk Manager mwunsch@monmouth.edu and a Motor Vehicle Record must be conducted before the advisor is allowed to drive. It is recommended that this be done several weeks in advance.

⬜ The registration of attendees/payments for the trip must be done through the advisor, departmental office or the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations unless otherwise approved by the Office of Student Activities. For timely processing, it is recommended this occurs a minimum of 45 days prior to trip for conferences/competitions and at least 30 days for other trips.

⬜ For each participant, their registration must include:

  • Name and student ID number of the person attending.
  • Local phone number and/or cell phone number.
  • An emergency contact name and phone number to notify in the event something happened to the person attending the trip.
  • If a guest is allowed, their registration must include their name, who they are the guest of, cell phone number and emergency contact name and phone number to notify in the event something happened to the person attending the trip.

⬜ Each participant must receive a copy of an itinerary for the trip at the time of sign up.

  • This information must include date(s) of the trip, what the destination is and if there will be any additional stops, time leaving Monmouth University, approximate time of leaving destination to return to Monmouth University, mode of transportation, hotel name/address/phone number (if applicable), and notification of any nonrefundable deposits and fees if the trip is cancelled.

⬜ The emergency contact information must be typed in alphabetical order along with the travel itinerary (the format will be provided by the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations) and submitted to the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations activities@monmouth.edu, Monmouth University Police Department at wmcelrat@monmouth.edu and dvolpe@monmouth.edu, Office of Compliance mwunsch@monmouth.edu. This must be completed and any updates must be submitted before the trip embarks.

⬜ Additional requirements are based on the nature of the trip and will be discussed at your meeting with the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations.

APPROVED CONFERENCES OR NON-SPORT COMPETITIONS (such as debate tournaments, Model UN, etc.)

⬜ The registration of attendees/payments for the trip must be done through the advisor, departmental office or the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations unless otherwise approved by the Office of Student Activities. For timely processing, it is recommended this occurs a minimum of 45 days prior to trip for conferences/competitions and at least 30 days for other trips.

⬜ Payment for hotels and/or airfare should be discussed with the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations at your initial meeting.

⬜ The responsible entity for registering attendees must collect the assumption of risk forms, payments, maintain accurate records of those payments, deposit those funds into the organization’s account, and provide attendees with a trip itinerary.

⬜ The University and Student Government Association limits the reimbursement for food during conferences/trips. Please ask the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations about current limitations for conference needs. No alcohol may be purchased. Only original itemized receipts will be reimbursed if meal reimbursements are approved.

APPROVED TRIPS with simple modes of transportation such as bus, van, public transportation, to museums, amusement parks, plays, and other non-conference activities

⬜ The responsible parties for the trip are to check to make sure that the attendee is leaving and returning as planned (e.g., on the bus/van). If the person is not leaving and returning as planned (e.g., on the bus/van), this should be noted in writing and the student must have a signed Assumption of Risk Form on file for the trip.

⬜ Trips must have at least one (1) advisor per bus or van (unless permission is granted from the Office of the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement or his/her designee). Additional advisors may be required based on the nature of the trip and number of attendees. The number of advisors required will be determined by the Office of the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement or his/her designee.

⬜ Students may take one (1) guest per trip unless the organization, Student Government Association, or the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations limits the trip to Monmouth University students only. The student is responsible for his or her guest. Guests must provide all of the information needed for registration and sign any applicable waiver/release and Assumption of Risk Form. Guests will not receive the student discount.

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS DRIVING THEMSELVES WITH PERMISSION

⬜ An Assumption of Risk Form shall be signed by all students and guests when non-professional drivers are utilized.

⬜ Students should never be required to take another student in their vehicle. Students who voluntarily take another student in their own vehicle or who is a passenger in another vehicle must sign an Assumption of Risk Form understanding they are transporting voluntarily and at their own risk. Students must be advised that Monmouth University does not provide insurance coverage and if there is a loss or damage, the driver’s insurance would cover the loss.

IN CASES WHERE A CAR OR VAN IS RENTED FOR ALL

⬜ When the advisor is driving the rented vehicle, the advisor must provide a copy of their driver’s license to the Director of Compliance/Risk Manager mwunsch@monmouth.edu and a Motor Vehicle Record must be conducted before the advisor is allowed to drive. It is recommended that this be done several weeks in advance.

⬜ Monmouth University has a rental agreement with Enterprise Rent-A-Car offering discounted pricing, unlimited miles, full collision coverage, liability coverage, free pick-up/delivery service. If Enterprise Rent-A-Car is unavailable due to the date(s) of your trip or unavailability of vehicle(s) needed, you may choose a different company but you must first seek approval from the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations. If Enterprise Rent-A-Car is not used, insurance offered by the rental car company must be purchased and the vehicle rental agreement must be reviewed by the Office of General Counsel and the Director of Compliance and Risk Management. The vehicle rental agreement must be signed by the Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement.

⬜ An Assumption of Risk Form shall be signed by all passengers when non-professional drivers are utilized, including when an Advisor is driving a rented vehicle.

⬜ The rental costs associated with the rental must be paid for by the student organization.

ADVISOR’S RESPONSIBILITIES ON THE TRIP INCLUDE

⬜ Assisting the student organization in acquiring the proper transportation, if necessary.

⬜ Confirming and verifying that the student responsible for coordinating the trip has made proper arrangements for payment with the destination and bus/van/car rental companies.

⬜ Assuring that Monmouth University’s Assumption of Risk Forms have been completed and turned into the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations (if applicable). Either The Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations or the Advisor must retain the Assumption of Risk Form for seven years from the date of the activity. (Originals are not required to be retained as long as Advisor retains a scanned pdf signed copy in a permanent shared drive or other document retention database.)

⬜ Sending a copy of the trip roster of attendees, emergency contact information and a trip itinerary to the Monmouth University Police Department dvolpe@monmouth.edu and wmcelrat@monmouth.edu and the Office Student Activities and Student Center Operations at activities@monmouth.edu and Office of Compliance mwunsch@monmouth.edu and assuring that the copy has been sent.

⬜ Assuring that the student in charge has verified that all people are on the bus/van/car before leaving Monmouth University and that everyone has gotten back on the bus/van/car to return at the appropriate time, unless otherwise noted.

⬜ Acting as a Monmouth University representative and liaison between the student organization, destination, rental company and Monmouth University if a problem arises on the trip.

⬜ Handling emergency situations should they arise.

⬜ Keeping the phone number of rental company, Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations (732) 571-3586, and the Monmouth University Police Department (732) 571-4444 as a reference in case of problems on the trip.

⬜ If there are any changes to the trip prior to departure, sending an email with an updated list of attendees and any other changes to the trip to the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations activities@monmouth.edu, Monmouth University Police Department at wmcelrat@monmouth.edu and dvolpe@monmouth.edu and Office of Compliance mwunsch@monmouth.edu.

⬜ Any Clery reportable crime/incident that occurs must be reported to the Monmouth University Police Department (732) 571-4444, fax (732) 263-5157 or dvolpe@monmouth.edu and wmcelrat@monmouth.edu and Monmouth University’s Clery Compliance Officer, Amy Arlequin, at aarlequi@monmouth.edu or (732) 571-7577.

⬜ Any conduct in violation of Title IX and/or Monmouth University’s Sexual Misconduct policy must be reported to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, Nina Anderson, at nanderso@monmouth.edu or (732) 571-7577. This includes, but is not limited to: sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

 

 

What To Do When a Business Wants Your Members to Sign a Release or Waiver for an Activity

Should your organization members be asked by an outside business to sign a waiver or release for a program or activity in which they would participate, please send a copy of the waiver/release to the Office of Student Activities and Student Center Operations so they can have it reviewed by the Office of the General Counsel before the club members sign it. The goal is to make sure that the members understand what they are signing and to attempt to negotiate revisions that might be of significant concern.

What To Do if the Club Wants To Do an Activity Working with Minors

If you, or your club will be working or volunteering with minors either on campus or off campus, please complete the online Working with Minors training course in advance of your program or event. You may contact the Director of Student Activities and Student Center Operations to obtain the link to the online training program.

Advisor Responsibilities Under the Clery Act (Crime Reporting Statistics)

PURPOSE:
The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy & Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) requires Monmouth University to collect, classify, count and disseminate crime report crime statistics in an Annual Security Report (ASR) by October 1st of each year to all currently enrolled students and employees.

  1. Clery Geography
    Monmouth University must disclose statistics for reported Clery crimes that occur: (1) on-campus, (2) on public property within or immediately adjacent to the campus, and (3) in or on non-campus buildings or property that Monmouth University owns or controls.

    1. On-Campus
      On-campus property includes: (1) any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and (2) any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the area identified in Section A(1) of this definition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor).
    2. Non-Campus Buildings or Property
      Non-campus buildings or property include: (1) any building or property owned or controlled by an officially recognized student organization that is officially recognized by the institution; or (2) any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same contiguous geographic area of the institution.
    3. Public Property
      Public property includes all public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the institution’s campus or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.
  2. Definitions of Criminal Offenses
    The Clery Act requires institutions to disclose four categories of crime statistics: criminal offenses, hate crimes, arrests and referrals for disciplinary action, VAWA offenses.

    1. Criminal Offenses
      1. Criminal Homicide – These offenses are separated into two categories: (a) Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter, and (b) Negligent Manslaughter.
        1. Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter – The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.
        2. Negligent Manslaughter – The killing of another person through gross negligence.
      2. Robbery – The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.
      3. Aggravated Assault – An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault is usually accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. (It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used which could and probably will result in serious personal injury if the crime were successfully completed).
      4. Burglary – The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes, this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
      5. Motor Vehicle Theft – The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. (Classify as motor vehicle theft all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access even though the vehicles are later abandoned –including joyriding.)
      6. Arson – any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
      7. Sex Offenses– Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.
        1. Forcible Sex Offenses –
          1. Rape – The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
          2. Fondling – The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
        2. Non-Forcible Sex Offenses –
          1. Incest – Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
          2. Statutory Rape – Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent
    2. Hate Crimes
      Any of the above mentioned offenses, and any incidents of larceny,-theft, simple assault, intimidation, or destruction/damage/vandalism of property that were motivated by bias.

      1. Larceny-Theft – The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. Attempted larcenies are included. Embezzlement, confidence games, forgery, worthless checks, etc., are included.
      2. Simple Assault – An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.
      3. Intimidation – To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.
      4. Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property – To willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the person having custody or control of it.
    3. Arrests and Disciplinary Referrals for Violation of Weapons, Drug and Liquor Laws
      The third category of crime statistics that Universities must disclose are the number of arrests and the number of persons referred for disciplinary actions for the following law violations:

      1. Weapons, Carrying, Possessing, Etc.– The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons.
      2. Drug Abuse Violations – The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use. The unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation, or importation of any controlled drug or narcotic substance. Arrests for violations of state and local laws, specifically those relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs.
      3. Liquor Law Violations – The violation of state or local laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages, not including driving under the influence and drunkenness.
    4. Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) Offenses
      The fourth category of crime statistics that Universities must disclose includes the following:

      1. Dating Violence –
        Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

        1. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
        2. For purposes of this definition –
          1. Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
          2. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
        3. Any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
      2. Domestic Violence –
        1. A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed –
          1. By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;
          2. By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;
          3. By a person who is cohabitating with or who has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;
          4. By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or
          5. By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.
        2. Any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
      3. Stalking –
        1. Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to;
          1. Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
          2. Suffer substantial emotional distress.
        2. For the purpose of this definition –
          1. Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or other means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
          2. Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
          3. Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
        3. Any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
  3. Preparation and Disclosure of Crime Statistics
    By October 1 of each year, notification of the new Guide for a Safe Campus is emailed to current students and employees. A hard copy of the report is available upon request to the Monmouth University Police Department. The crime statistics are also submitted to the United States Department of Education on an annual basis.

    The Monmouth University Police Department collects its own statistics and accepts supplemental numbers from campus security authorities in their reporting roles. The Monmouth University Police Department also annually sends a request to local law enforcement agencies that have jurisdiction over some of the University’s Clery geography. Additionally annual emails are sent to each individual campus security authority at Monmouth University to ensure that all incidents have been reported for the previous calendar year.

  4. Campus Security Authorities
    1. Definition
      The Clery Act regulations define the following persons as campus security authorities:

      1. A member of a campus police department or a campus security department of an institution.
      2. Any individual or individuals who have responsibility for campus security but who does not constitute a campus police department or a campus security department (e.g., an individual who is responsible for monitoring the entrance into institutional property).
      3. Any individual or organization specified in an institution’s statement of campus security policy as an individual or organization to which students and employees should report criminal offenses.
      4. An official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student housing, student discipline, and campus judicial proceedings unless the official is exempt from being a campus security authority as set forth in this policy.
    2. Responsibilities of Campus Security Authorities (CSAs)
      1. Campus Security Authorities must report allegations of Clery Act crimes that have been disclosed to them. Allegations of Clery Act crimes can be reported on the Monmouth University Campus Security Authority Crime & Incident Report Form and submitting it to the Monmouth University Police Department. A copy of the form can be obtained from the Monmouth University Police Department. It is important to report allegations to the Monmouth University Police Department immediately because the report may be the basis for determining if there is a serious or continuing threat to the safety of the campus community which may warrant a timely warning or Hawk Safety Alert. If a CSA is unsure whether or not an incident is a Clery crime, he or she should report it.
      2. Unless a CSA is a Monmouth University Police Officer, he or she is not responsible for determining authoritatively whether or not a crime took place and should never try to apprehend an alleged perpetrator of a crime.
      3. CSAs do not have the responsibility to try and convince a victim to contact law enforcement if a victim chooses not to do so. However, if a victim does not want a report to go any further than the CSA, a CSA must explain that he or she is required to submit the report for statistical purposes, but can submit the report without identifying the victim.
    3. Examples of Campus Security Authorities at Monmouth University
      Examples of campus security authorities at Monmouth University include, but are not limited to:

      A. President

      B. Provost & V.P. for Academic Affairs

      • Provost & V.P. for Academic Affairs
      • Vice Provosts
      • All Associate Vice Presidents
      • All Assistant Vice Presidents
      • All Academic Deans
      • All Associate Deans
      • All Assistant Deans
      • All Directors
      • Athletics Professor in Residence
      • Department Chairs
      • All faculty taking students on domestic and international trips
      • All faculty advisors

      C. V.P. & General Counsel

      • V.P. & General Counsel
      • Associate General Counsel
      • Director of Equity and Diversity/Title IX Coordinator
      • Director of Internal Audit

      D. V.P. for Enrollment Management

      • V.P. Enrollment Management
      • All Associate Vice Presidents
      • All Assistant Vice Presidents
      • All Directors

      E. V.P. for Finance

      • V.P. Finance
      • All Associate Vice Presidents
      • All Assistant Vice Presidents
      • All Directors

      F. V.P. for External Affairs

      • V.P. External Affairs
      • All Associate Vice Presidents
      • All Assistant Vice Presidents
      • All Directors

      G. V.P. & Director of Athletics

      • V.P. and Director of Athletics
      • All Directors
      • All Associate Directors
      • All Head Coaches
      • All Assistant Coaches

      H. V.P. Student Life & Leadership Engagement

      • V.P. for Student Life and Student Engagement
      • All Associate Vice Presidents
      • All Assistant Vice Presidents
      • All Directors
      • All Associate Directors
      • All Assistant Directors
      • All Area Coordinators and Residential Assistants in Residential Life
      • All Coordinators in Student Life and Student Activities
      • All Advisors to recognized student clubs and organizations, fraternities and sororities

      I. V.P. for Administrative Services

      • V.P. Administrative Services
      • All Members of the M.U.P.D.
      • All Associate Vice Presidents
      • All Assistant Vice Presidents
      • All Directors

      J. V.P. for Information Management

      • V.P. for Information Management
      • All Associate Vice Presidents
      • All Assistant Vice Presidents
      • All Directors
      • * If you are unsure whether or not you are a CSA, please contact Amy Arlequin at 732-571-7577

    4. Examples of Non-Campus Security Authorities at Monmouth University
      The following individuals would not meet the criteria for being campus security authorities include, but are not limited to:

      1. A faculty member who does not have any responsibility for student and campus activity beyond the classroom.
      2. Clerical Staff
      3. Professional Counselors whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling to members of the Monmouth University community and functioning within the scope of his/her license or certification, including, but not limited to:
        • Director of Psychological Counseling
        • Psychological Counselors
        • Assistant Director of Psychological Counseling
      4. All physicians, nurse practitioners, clinicians, coordinators in Health Services whose official responsibilities include treating, examining, and/or counseling members of the Monmouth University community and functioning within the scope of his/her license or certification, including, but not limited to:
        • Director of Health Services
        • Substance Awareness Coordinators
        • Volunteer Substance Awareness Assistants
        • University Health Clinicians
        • Consulting Physicians
        • University Nurse Practitioners

*Individuals in Section C and D above who are not acting within the scope of their license, may be considered a campus security authority if they meet the definition. An example would be a psychological counselor who is an advisor to the student club. If an incident was reported during a club event, the individual must report as a CSA.

What Are My Responsibilities as a Campus Security Authority?

  • If an individual reporting an incident needs assistance, a CSA should explain how to get help. Let a victim know that help is available even if he or she does not want an investigation conducted. The decision to act on this option is the victim’s. However, in the midst of an emergency situation, a CSA should immediately contact the MUPD at (732) 571-4444 or call 911.
  • Even if you are unsure whether an incident is a Clery crime, or even if it’s criminal in nature, you should report it. WHEN IN DOUBT, REPORT!
  • Provide as much information about a criminal incident as possible to aid law enforcement and categorize the incident.
  • CSA crime reports should include personally identifying information if available. This is important for law enforcement purposes and to avoid double counting of crimes/incidents. The Clery statistical disclosures based on these reports will be kept anonymous, i.e., no personally identifiable information is disclosed in Monmouth University’s annual security report.
  • If a victim does not want a report to go any further than the CSA, explain that you are required to submit the report for statistical purposes, but you can submit it without identifying the victim.
  • If a crime is reported to you and goes no further than that, Monmouth University will not have fulfilled its obligation under the law and the campus community might not have the information they need to stay safe on campus. If the Department of Education finds that Monmouth University did not report a crime/incident in its annual security report, it can be fined and lose its federal funding, i.e., financial aid.
  • Again … IF IN DOUBT, REPORT!

  • Submit your crime/incident report in a timely manner. Forms can be accessed by the Office of the General Counsel or the MUPD. You may even report in an email to the MUPD.
  • Reports shall be submitted to the MUPD.

Title IX – Responsible Employees

Title IX of the Education Amendments is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any educational program or activity that receives federal funding. Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex has been interpreted to included: sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

Under Title IX, a Responsible Employee is any employee who has the authority to take action to redress sexual violence; who has been given the duty of reporting incidents of sexual violence or any other misconduct by students to the Title IX Coordinator or other appropriate University designee; or whom a student could reasonably believe has this authority or duty. A responsible employee is required to report any incident of sexual misconduct, of which they are aware, to the Office of Equity and Diversity. Incidents of sexual misconduct include sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. Monmouth University policy designates every individual employed by the University as a responsible employee.

// //