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  • Professional Education Program
    Continuing Education for Social Workers

    A Division of the Office of Field and Professional Education

    Click to Download Current Brochure

    Cover Artwork by
    Megan E. Cittadino
    megcittadino.carbonmade.com

    All workshops located on the Monmouth University campus:

    400 Cedar Avenue
    West Long Branch, NJ 07764

    View our Campus Map and Directions to the University.


    ATTENTION SOCIAL WORK ALUMNI:

    All Monmouth University School of Social Work Alumni will receive a 20% discount for each workshop registration.

    ATTENTION ALL REGISTRANTS:

    Register for 5 or more workshops at one time and you will receive a 10% discount off the total price based on standard registration fees.

    Please Note: These discounts cannot be combined.


       


    To subscribe to be mailed the print brochure, please send an e-mail to: swfield@monmouth.edu


    Programs for Spring 2017

    All Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are non-clinical unless otherwise specified.

    competence   ethics

    Look for Cultural Competence and Ethics tags to find workshops that meet special license renewal requirements.

  • Healing the Healer: Power Principals for Life Balance Success & Fulfillment in the Field of Social Work

    Monday, April 24, 2017

    The Club Lounge at Magill Commons

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 CEUs

    There are only 24 hours in each day but do you feel like you keep trying to squeeze 36 hours’ worth of “life” into it? Once we hit the point of overwhelmed in our social work practice—life gets crowded causing our relationships, emotions, and priorities to go awry. Learn how to create balance in both your personal and professional lives by rewiring your mind and your priorities. This workshop will help you focus on stress reduction, work/life balance, and satisfaction through personal development and professional success. Healing the Healer means helping you focus on discovering your strengths and using them to create a vision of work/life balance by utilizing strategies and techniques to begin taking consistent and disciplined action to stay motivation and inspired in your life and practice. This highly interactive and dynamic workshop will provide you with tools you can implement immediately in your life and practice to create higher success, happiness, and fulfillment.


    Bailey Frumen, MSW, LCSW,  helps women break free from stress and boredom to create their ideal life. In 2012, after being physiologically and emotionally burnt out from living life like a “You Should” checklist, Bailey decided to break free and finally create a life that she adored. From the inspiration of her journey to rebuild her health and reconnect with her life, she created Life Love Roadmap.


    The Karpman Drama Triangle in Action: Working to Get Clients OFF the Triangle

    Friday, April 28, 2017

    The Club Lounge at Magill Commons

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Clinical CEUs

    In times of uncertainty and personal or social stress, individuals often gravitate to certain role configurations (e.g. “persecutor,” “victim,” “rescuer”) because it makes them feel safe. The Karpman Drama Triangle, developed by Stephen Karpman, is a model of this dysfunctional relationship dynamic. In this workshop participants will learn how to recognize and understand the disempowering nature of this triangle and explore interventions for improved self-awareness, conflict resolution strategies, and healthier relationships. This experiential workshop will provide tools for helping clients navigate personal stress, and guide them on a healthier path forward during troubled times.


    Scottie Urmey, LCSW, TEP,  is a licensed clinical social worker, board certified psychodramatist, and approved clinical supervisor for social workers and counselors seeking advanced licensure in NJ. Scottie’s clinical work with adults, children, and families includes inpatient, outpatient, IOP, partial hospital, community based and private practice settings. She received her Bachelors of Science in Psychology from Saint Peters University and her Masters in Social Work from Monmouth University (’07). Scottie received the 2014 Alumni of the Year Award from Monmouth University School of Social Work and the 2014 Volunteer Award from the Mental Health Association of Monmouth County for contributions made post-Superstorm Sandy. Scottie is a passionate educator and trainer, regularly presenting workshops locally and nationally and forming Psychodrama New Jersey, LLC as an institute of professional education as well as psychotherapy.

    Ron Collier, LCSW, TEP, is a licensed clinical social worker, board certified psychodramatist, and approved clinical supervisor. Ron has held clinical and supervisory positions for over 35 years. He received the Bertha-Capon-Reynolds award from Monmouth University School of Social Work for his outstanding field supervision in 2007 and the 2014 Volunteer Award from the Mental Health Association of Monmouth County for his personal contributions and oversight of volunteer’s in the aftermath of Super storm Sandy. In addition to his full time private practice he consults for the Mental Health Association of Monmouth County, and conduct psychodrama therapy groups for Monmouth Medical Center's Community Connections program.

    Ron and Scottie received the 2016 Collaborators Award from the American Society of Group Psychotherapy & Psychodrama for their combined contribution to the learning and practice of psychodrama, sociometry, and group psychotherapy.


    Politics, Ethics and Social Work

    Friday, May 05, 2017

    The Club at Magill Commons, Room 107

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Ethics CEUs

    We cannot pretend that our work is not political. We aim for specific results within specific policy contexts, and we work for social change within a political system. Yet it is hard to imagine how to keep our professional commitment to social justice in the current, polarized political climate. How do we ethically advocate for clients as programs and services are impacted by politics? How do we keep politics from coming between ourselves and our clients? How do we work ethically for social change? This workshop will explore micro, mezza and macro social work practice and define ethical politics for social workers.


    Mary Lou Killian Searles, PhD, LCSW,  holds a PhD in public policy and an MSW in clinical social work and has long grappled with how to live in the land where politics and social work overlap. She has worked with clients in programs ranging from HIV case management, forensic and outpatient mental health care, and shelter services to private practice serving individuals recovering from trauma. She has provided clinical supervision in a variety of settings and has researched and published in the area of public policy. Dr Killian Searles has taught clinical social work, field education, and political science and is currently a nonprofit administrator and an adjunct in sociology.


    Social Work and Migration: Working with Immigrants and Refugees

    Monday, May 15, 2017

    The Club at Magill Commons, Room 107

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Cultural Competence CEUs

    It has been estimated that by 2050 nearly half of the U.S. population will be foreign born. In order to remain adaptive, competitive and effective, social workers, nonprofit organizations, and policy makers must be prepared to work with immigrants and their families. Particularly in the rapidly changing face of immigration law, successful social work with immigrants must begin with an understanding of their legal status and how that status impacts their housing, employment, health care, education, and virtually every other aspect of life.

    This full-day workshop offers an overview of the history of migration, legal definitions of newcomers, obtaining documents for lawful permanent residence, refugee and asylum status, grounds for exclusion and deportation, and paths to naturalized citizenship. Content and case examples will explore social work practice issues such as cultural competence, and a strength-based approach to dealing with immigrant clients and families.


    Michael Cronin, PhD, LCSW,  is an Associate Professor of Social Work at Monmouth University School of Social Work and is the Coordinator for the International and Community Development Concentration. Dr. Cronin holds a PhD from Yeshiva University and a MS in Social Work from Columbia University. His research interests and publications are in international social work, health care and social policy, disaster management, social gerontology, international humanitarian law, and cultural competence. Dr. Cronin has volunteered with the American Red Cross in Greater New York since 1996 and currently serves as the Chapter’s representative for international disaster mental health collaboration. His work and collaboration with international colleagues as a disaster mental health leader and instructor contributed to the development of curriculum and training for several Red Cross/Red Crescent Societies around the world. He was invited in 2009 to be a Roster Member of the International Psychosocial Support Team for the International Federation of Red Cross & Red Crescent Societies. Dr. Cronin is the Main Representative to the United Nations in New York for the International Federation of Social Workers where he leads a team to raise global awareness about social issues, including aging, the family, health and mental health, social development, status of women, youth, migrants, and human rights.


    Understanding the Impact of Trauma on Children and Adolescents

    Friday, May 19, 2017

    The Club Dining Room at Magill Commons

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Clinical CEUs

    Many adolescents have experienced at least one traumatic event in their lifetime. Traumatic events can include physical abuse, sexual abuse, domestic violence, community violence, and/or disasters. This workshop is designed to assist individuals working with children and adolescents in counseling settings to understand trauma and its impact on young people. Participants will learn: how exposure to traumatic events can affect the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of youth; how trauma may derail normal childhood and adolescent development and affect a youth’s ability to adapt to and cope with challenging situations; offer a better understanding of the behaviors youth develop to survive traumatic events, and what happens when these ways of coping are no longer appropriate. Understanding and implementing strategies to address traumatized youth has the capacity to relieve the suffering caused by trauma and PTSD, as well as potentially reduce a youth’s future health, and mental health involvement.


    Jennifer R. Jones, PsyD, LPC,  is a licensed psychologist in New York and New Jersey and a Licensed Professional Counselor in New Jersey. Dr. Jones is the Associate Director of Mental health for the Adolescent and Young Adult populations at Riker’s Island. Additionally, she facilitates training and workshops for Juvenile Probation and Correction Officers and professionals around the country in order to spread knowledge about the impact of trauma and mental health issues on youth involved. Dr. Jones is an active participant with the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN), and has held positions on the state and national boards of The Association of Black Psychologists, where she continues to advocate for the mental health needs of the Black community. Dr. Jones’s research interests focus on the disproportionality of Black students receiving exclusionary discipline in school systems and issues of the over representation of Black youth in the juvenile justice system. She has presented her research at national conferences such as the American Psychological Association, The Association of Black Psychologists, and the National Association of School Psychologists. Dr. Jones co-authored a chapter on classroom management for the International Handbook of Student Achievement and has published articles concerning Black students and school discipline.


    Social Work Practice in the Context of Islamophobia

    Tuesday, May 23, 2017

    Rebecca Stafford Student Center, Carol Afflitto Conference Room

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Cultural Competence CEUs

    The term “Islamophobia” refers to hostility toward Islam and Muslims that dehumanizes an entire faith, portraying it as fundamentally alien and attributing to it an inherent, essential set of negative traits such as irrationality, intolerance and violence. Islamophobia impacts all persons assumed to be Muslim including South Asians, Sikhs and Arab Americans.

    From the long ranging effects of 9/11, to the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida, to the current high profile debates and Executive Orders around immigration, travel bans, and Muslim majority countries – there has been a sharp increase of Islamophobic rhetoric, anti-Muslim hate crimes, and violence ranging from verbal harassment and bullying, to vandalism of mosques and murder. This climate of hate and fear has a negative impact on the mental and physical health of children, individuals and families that are Muslim and on those that are perceived to be Muslim.

    Social workers have the ability to play a key role in dismantling Islamophobia. By educating ourselves on Islamophobia and examining our own preconceived notions as well as the impact of it on individuals, families and children, we can become stronger practitioners, educators and allies both within and outside our respective agencies. In this interactive workshop, participants will increase their awareness of stereotypes of Islam and Muslim cultures and learn to identify key elements of Islamophobia and its racialized impact on Muslim and non-Muslim individuals, children and families in the United States. In addition, participants will increase their knowledge of the ally model and skills and strategies in which they can be allies in the fight against Islamophobia on micro, mezzo, and macro system levels. Participants will leave the session with resources to support their process of becoming more knowledgeable of Islamophobia and of ways to challenge it.


    Anne C. Deepak, PhD,  is an Associate Professor at Monmouth University School of Social Work. Her practice, teaching and research experience is in the areas of diversity and social justice, anti-racism education and practice, postcolonial feminist social work theory and practice and international and community development. She currently serves as a member of Council on Social Work Education’s Women’s Council.

    Sockna Momie Cisse, MSW, is a graduate from Monmouth University School of Social Work’s International and Community Development concentration. She is currently a mental health counselor at Venture House, an agency dedicated to the rehabilitation of individuals with severe mental illnesses. She primarily works within the advocacy office, often meeting with assembly members and senators to ensure proper legislation that will protect the rights of individuals with mental illness.

    Hawa Diaby, MSW,  is a graduate from Monmouth University School of Social Work’s International and Community Development concentration.


    Keys to Handling Child Sexual Abuse Disclosure

    Thursday, May 25, 2017

    Rebecca Stafford Student Center, Carol Affilitto Conference Room

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Clinical CEUs

    In our effort to be good social workers, create a safe space and have an open dialog with the children we work with in schools, addictions, hospital, and community based settings we may find ourselves engaged in difficult conversations where sexual abuse is disclosed. This experiential workshop will cover crucial factors in handling a disclosure and challenge your level of comfort necessary to become that trusted “tell able person.” The focus will be on understanding the victim/survivor perspective.


    Linda Fischer Hopkins, MSW, LCSW, ACSW,  was previously employed by Ocean Township and the Family Growth Program (Catholic Charities) when they administered the Monmouth County Sexual Abuse Treatment and Prevention Program as a Sexual Abuse Prevention Educator and group facilitator. She is also the prior chairperson of the Monmouth County Sexual Abuse Coalition and active participant on the Prosecutor's Task Force on Sexual Abuse and its initiative "It Happens to Boys Too.”


    Clinical Supervision

    Mondays, June 5, 12, and 19, 2017

    Bey Hall, Room 129

    9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (30 minute assignment completed independently satisfies all 20 hours of post-graduate coursework)

    $325

    20 Clinical CEUs including 5 Ethics and 3 Cultural Competence CEUs

    Interested in supervising colleagues on the path to their LCSW? This interactive workshop satisfies 20 hours of continuing education credits of post-graduate course-work related to supervision. In it you will learn the responsibilities of being a clinical supervisor, identify your supervisory strengths, and explore the complex dynamics of the supervisory relationship. Special attention will be paid to adhering to ethical and culturally competent practice. You must be present for each day of the workshop to receive credit. You may take this course prior to having your LCSW.


    Scottie Urmey, LCSW, TEP,  is a licensed clinical social worker, board certified psychodramatist, and approved clinical supervisor for social workers and counselors seeking advanced licensure in NJ. Scottie’s clinical work with adults, children, and families includes inpatient, outpatient, IOP, partial hospital, community based, and private practice settings. She received her Bachelors of Science in Psychology from Saint Peters University and her Masters in Social Work from Monmouth University (’07). Scottie received the 2014 Alumni of the Year Award from Monmouth University School of Social Work and the 2014 Volunteer Award from the Mental Health Association of Monmouth County for contributions made post-Super storm Sandy. Scottie is a passionate educator and trainer, regularly presenting workshops locally and nationally and forming Psychodrama New Jersey, LLC as an institute of education as well as psychotherapy. Topics of particular interest include; clinical applications of psychodrama, clinical supervision, professional self-care & sustainability, professional ethics, clinical applications of mindfulness and environmental justice.


    Using DBT and Loving Kindness Skills for Patients with Addictions and Other Self-Harming Behaviors

    Tuesday, June 06, 2017

    The Club Dining Room at Magill Commons

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Clinical CEUs

    Working with High Risk patients can be an exhausting and overwhelming process even for the most skilled clinician. These patients require complex and multi-level treatments. This workshop will review assessment and treatment planning to ensure appropriate levels of care and will explore the use of DBT Coping Skills, especially Mindfulness, along with Loving Kindness techniques and meditation. Along with psychotherapy and other modalities, therapists will be able to teach patients coping skills to self-manage High Risk Symptoms which will increase patient safety and resilience while enhancing self-care and positive wellbeing.


    Rosemary Ravelo, LCSW,  has more than 30 years of social work practice in New York and New Jersey. She has worked in child abuse treatment, family therapy with abusive families, child welfare, addiction treatment, and hospital and school social work. She is currently Director of Social Work Services and Case management for Princeton House inpatient psychiatric hospital working with psychiatric, dual diagnosed and detox patients. Her private practice focuses on wellness management, trauma and mindfulness.


    Life Coaching & Psychotherapeutic Practice

    Thursday, June 15, 2017

    The Club Dining Room at Magill Commons

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Clinical CEUs

    We all know that social workers have a multitude of skills that are transferable to a wide variety of settings. Why not life coaching? Social workers inherently have the knowledge to help clients cope with challenges and achievement, the practice of life coaching can be a logical career move. Life coaching focuses on helping others achieve their personal best. The goal is to create ease, enhance power and develop abundance. This workshop will discuss the essence of lifestyle design as the wealth of effective and creative tools that empower clients to transform their lives, situations, and outcomes. Lifestyle design is essential to guiding clients toward clarity, enlightenment, and inspiration to create their ideal life.


    Bailey Frumen, MSW, LCSW,  helps women break free from stress and boredom to create their ideal life. In 2012, after being physiologically and emotionally burnt out from living life like a “You Should” checklist, Bailey decided to break free and finally create a life that she adored. From the inspiration of her journey to rebuild her health and reconnect with her life, she created Life Love Roadmap.


    Energetic Solutions

    Thursday, June 22, 2017

    McAllan Hall Room 328

    9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    $98

    5 Clinical CEUs

    Everything, from how we feel to the food we eat and places we go, has energy. But not all energy is created equal - from amount (high vs. low) to quality (positive vs. negative), energy varies in highly impactful ways. This workshop will give you a better understanding of energy, its sources, and how it affects us and those around us. You will practice using tools to help yourself and your clients access and keep positive energy. Often people focus on, and get stuck in, what they don’t want- utilizing activities helps to reframe thinking around wants and encourages the prioritizing of goals. Additionally, you will learn simple techniques for protection against absorbing and internalizing negative energy.


    Debbie McCann-Call, MSW, LCSW,  received her Bachelors of Arts and Masters of Social Work from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. In addition, she has training in such areas as Clinical Hypnosis, Mindfulness, Pranic Healing, Integrative Eye Movement therapy, just to name a few. She has worked with clients of all ages. Debbie currently has a private practice in Middletown, NJ, supervises LSWs and teaches workshops. Debbie began her training in Pranic Healing back in 1998. She has found it to be invaluable with clients as well as in self-care. Debbie facilitates free meditations in Red Bank and other locations. Debbie was on the Board of NASW-NJ for 5 years and is currently the Chair of the Monmouth/Ocean Unit.