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11609

General Education

Previous Courses Fall 2016

Fall 2016: First Year Seminar Available Courses

Course Title Course Number Professor

Great Excavations: The Archaeology of the Ancient World

FY-101-AN02 A. Heinrich
Day and Time: TTH 4:30-5:50

Description:

The course is a first-year seminar that examines how archaeologists study and interpret the ancient world. Ancient societies from North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe are examined. Students are introduced to the ethical challenges that face archaeologists and to how archaeologists separate fact from fiction.Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will be used to pay for transportation to either the University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia or the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Additional in-class projects may also be supported by this fee.

From Our Classroom to Your Boardroom – Necessary Business Skills

FY-101-BM01 J. Buzza
C. DeStefano
Day and Time: TTH 10:05-11:25, 8:30-9:50

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine various approaches on how to use your knowledge and maximize its application to college life, the outside world and your future at Monmouth University. We will utilize a series of tasks that must be performed well to insure the success of any student in an entrepreneurial setting.

From Our Classroom to Your Boardroom – Necessary Business Skills

FY-101-BM02 J. Buzza
Day and Time: MTH 1:15-2:35

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine various approaches on how to use your knowledge and maximize its application to college life, the outside world and your future at Monmouth University. We will utilize a series of tasks that must be performed well to insure the success of any student in an entrepreneurial setting.

How Rock and Roll Shaped America in the 1950’s and 1960’s

FY-101-BM03 S. Rosenberg
Day and Time: TF 2:50-4:10

Description:

This course introduces students to the impact of rock and roll music, from its beginnings in 1955 through the end of the 1960s. During this fifteen year period, popular music witnessed a new generation of singers, songwriters, musicians, and producers who innovated a variety of new musical genres, all of which fell under heading of rock and roll. Moreover, this period was one of tremendous political and social upheaval, and rock and roll not only mirrored the evolution of the socio-political environment but it also had a significant effect in shaping the popular culture of this turbulent and exciting time. From the emergence of Elvis Presley in the mid-1950s, to the teen idols of the late 1950s, to the British invasion and soul music in the mid-1960s, to the progressive rock of the late 1960s, all of the important developments in popular music are thoroughly reviewed in the context of this golden era of rock and roll.

Working with Attitudes: Teambuilding and Collaboration

FY-101-BM04 W. Greason
Day and Time: MW 4:30-5:50

Description:

This course is designed to show us that we are truly DYNAMIC individuals and that change and growth can be a positive part of collegiate life. You will be introduced to the benefits of working collaboratively in a group as a team. You will work on high involvement activities and projects critical to increasing your self-awareness and interdependence. By working in a team you will enhance your critical thinking and decision making skills, broaden your base of information, learn the art of consensus building, heighten your communication and listening skills, conduct an ongoing effectiveness assessment, formulate and strengthen your values, create a cultural foundation, become accountable to others, set, agree upon, and attain goals, and manage your ethical and moral behavior for the good of the group.

Dinosaurs and DNA: Biology in the Movies

FY-101-BY01 D. Lobo
Day and Time: MW 11:40-1:00

Description:

Dinosaurs and DNA: Biology in the Movies is designed to introduce students to college life at Monmouth University and to the field of biology. Students will become familiar with resources provided by Monmouth University to help them with all aspects of their college life. They will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college as well as ethical issues pertaining to the field of biology. Students will learn about basic aspects of genetics (inheritance), cloning, and genetic engineering through readings, discussions, and assignments related to popular movies (GATTACA, Jurassic Park). Students will participate in various University functions as they learn how to be successful in college. They will become familiar with the academic culture of biologists

Encounters with Unseen Life

FY-101-BY02 K. Lionetti
Day and Time: TTH 1:15-2:35, 11:40-1:00

Description:

Encounters with Unseen Life is a first year seminar course designed to introduce students to college life at Monmouth University and to the field of biology. Students will become familiar with resources provided by Monmouth University to help them with all aspects of their college life. They will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college as well as ethical issues pertaining to the field of biology. Students will learn about basic biology and microbiology through readings, discussions, assignments and laboratory demonstrations. Students will participate in various University functions as they learn to how to be successful in college. They will become familiar with the academic culture of biologists. Lab Fee: The lab fee will cover the costs of materials that will be used in hands on activities in the microbiology lab related to the course.

Sustainable Energy

FY-101-CE01 G. Moehring
Day and Time: TF 11:40-1:00

Description:

Industry and transportation are two keys aspects of society that have been profoundly impacted by abundant low cost energy. What does the future of energy look like in terms of abundance and cost? This course examines energy sources, energy needs, and the transition from geologically stored energy sources (fossil fuels) to ecologically available energy sources and conservation.

Media and Criminal Justice: The CSI Effect

FY-101-CJ01 N. Sewitch
Day and Time: MTH 10:05-11:25

Description:

This course examines the relationship between and the effects of the popular media-motion pictures, popular television dramas and news reports-crime, and the criminal justice system. In addition, this course assists students in developing academic, personal and career development for students, including an orientation to Monmouth University and its resources. This course fulfills the First Year Seminar General Education Requirement.

Communication in Relationships: Personal, Social, and Professional Relationships

FY-101-CO01 S. Hokanson
Day and Time: TTH 10:05-11:25, 8:30-9:50

Description:

This course addresses the development, maintenance, and termination of personal, social, and professional relationships in our lives. This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience. Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engaging in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practicing their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem solving skills.

Talk About, Pop Music! Pop Music and Your First Year

FY-101-CO02 A. Furgason
Day and Time: TTH 10:05-11:25, 8:30-9:50

Description:

This class offers a historical examination of pop music from its inception in the 1960s to placate the viewed threat of Rock ‘n’ Roll music on youth through the pop music stars of today. Of particular interest is an emphasis on the production of pop music, the difference in pop genres and an examination of the themes found in pop music lyrics and videos. The class will examine what similarities and differences exist between the early pop music of Bobby Darin and Fabian, to the European influence on pop music from Abba and the Bay City Rollers, to the rise of New-Wave music and Teen Pop bands pop in the 1980s that led to the explosion of pop singers Britney Spears and Christina Aquilera and teen pop bands The Backstreet Boys and N’Sync in the early 1990s. The current state of pop music from stars like Bruno Mars, Miley Cyrus, and Lady Gaga will also be discussed. The class will cover areas that include the production of hooks, lyrical decisions, and the importance of music producers and engineers to the production of pop music. The impact of pop music on global, social, political, health, and cultural issues will be discussed extensively. In addition, the relationship between commercial radio, pop music and the music industry will be considered. The class also features hands-on application via student-led radio shows presenting different eras of pop music on Monmouth University’s radio station, 88.9FM WMCX.

Hollywood’s Journalism: The Image of Journalists and Journalism in Popular Culture

FY-101-CO03 M. Vujnovic
Day and Time: MTH 10:05-11:25

Description:

This seminar-style course explores representations of journalism and journalists (public relations practitioners, publicists) in Hollywood movies. Selection of the movies ranges from the 1920s to the present taking into account various historical perspectives. The course will also address sharpening higher-level academic skills, enhancing awareness of ethical issues, and making a successful transition to university life.

Mass Media and Popular Culture

FY-101-CO04 D. Dolphin
Day and Time: W 10:05-1:00

Description:

This course addresses the ways in which mass media affects the creation of a popular culture in our society, and how that popular culture impacts the values of the society in return. This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience. Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engaging in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practicing their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem solving skills.

Food, Communication, Culture and Performance

FY-101-CO06 D. Shoemaker
Day and Time: TF 11:40-1:00

Description:

The purpose of this seminar-style course is to explore topics of particular interest to first-year university students. We will explore how we use food to communicate personal identity, relationships, cultures, and politics. We will also examine the intersections of food, communication, ethics, and health issues across texts and practices: through published stories, advertising, cooking shows, and cookbooks; through interactions including conversations, demonstrations, and performances; and through preparing, sharing, and eating food.
Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will cover the cost of a field trip and other class related expenses.

Diversity & Life Through the World of Baseball & Film

FY-101-CO50 M. Harmon
Day and Time: T 6:05-9:00

Description:

James Earl Jones playing the character of Terence Mann in the film Field of Dreams says, “The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: it’s a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us of all that once was good and it could be again.”
Sports has been and continues to be a great teaching element for people from many walks of life involving issues that include; gender & racial issues, proper planning of finances, family life, friendships, working together, and having a dream. This class will also incorporate ways to sharpen your academic skills, enhance awareness of ethical issues that exist during college life, and help you make a successful transition to university life here at MU.

Lead or Step Aside

FY-101-EDL01 H. Allen
Day and Time: TTH 10:05-11:25, 8:30-9:50

Description:

There has been a great deal written about leadership. But how do we know who is and who is not a leader? What are the characteristics that distinguish a leader? Who have been the major leaders of all time? These questions are important for each of us to reflect on. Therefore the focus of this course is to explore the concepts of leadership with a special emphasis on ethical leadership.

Gaining Awareness: Racial Bias in the Media

FY-101-EDL02 T. Paone
Day and Time: MW 11:40-1:00

Description:

This course will allow students to see and critique racial bias in the media. The course will stress all races and will allow students to gain an understanding of the dominant cultural beliefs that exist in the United States and how those are portrayed in the media. It will also encompass the way the Whites and People of Color are portrayed and viewed in the media.

Current Issues in United States P-20 Latina/o Education

FY-101-EDL03 A. Estudillo
Day and Time: MW 4:30-5:50

Description:

In this course, students will further their awareness of the educational options among Latina/o students across a variety of areas including, but not limited to: existing and emerging demographics, urban and rural school settings, transitioning from P-12 to higher education, and related trends associated with the state of New Jersey and the Northeastern US. We will also explore the role of context in ethical and critical thinking skills that impact how students navigate the university setting.

The Detective Story: It’s Elementary

FY-101-EN01 S. Starke
Day and Time: TF 8:30-9:50

Description:

Do you love mysteries? The detective story is the bestselling form of narrative in the world, from classic literature to popular culture in TV shows, film, and even video games. In this course, through the use of lecture, discussion, small group activities, reading, in-class and out-of-class writing, and the use of video material, we will enjoy classic and contemporary short fiction featuring the amateur detective, the professional private investigator, and the police. What is behind our obsession with solving mysteries? What can the study of this genre teach us about society and ourselves? What can it teach us about our own intellectual work as students and scholars? Join us to find out!

Humans and the Environment

FY-101-EN02 H. Estes
C. Duckett
Day and Time: MW 11:40-1:00

Description:

This course introduces contemporary environmental issues from humanities perspectives. It asks students to think about ethical issues involved in human relationships with animals and the land, to take on a (small) environmentally focused project for the semester, and to think about how that action interacts with course materials.

Walkabouts: Coming of Age in the Modern World

FY-101-EN03 M. Moscaliuc
Day and Time: TF 11:40-1:00

Description:

We will read works of fiction, poetry, and drama about coming-of-age experiences from around the world, and examine these texts with three main goals: 1) to see how diverse transitions from childhood to adulthood share common features while remaining deeply particularized from culture to culture and from individual to individual; 2) to understand how cultural, historical, and political contexts, as well as questions of race, ethnicity, socio-economics, religion, and gender orientation inform one’s transition into adulthood; our readings will reveal how personal trauma, domestic or historical violence, racism, injustice, or displacement compounds the difficulties of an already complicated journey; 3) to become cognizant of the various ways in which we can manage and make good use of this transitional period. We will extend our discussions about literature to consider our positions as both participants in and witnesses to coming-of-age experiences, with special emphasis on resources, responsibilities, and ethics. Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will be used to pay for transportation and resources to support a collaborative project with a local high school.

Neverlands: Children’s Literature of the Golden Age

FY-101-EN04 K. Bluemel
Day and Time: MTH 1:15-2:35

Description:

This course asks you to engage in serious study of some of the most beloved texts written in English for children in the 19th and early 20th centuries, from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland to Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island and Kenneth Grahame’s Wind in the Willows. Since the field of children’s literature is too vast for us to attempt to examine it in full, we will limit ourselves to study of representative texts of English literature that scholars recognize today as “Golden Age” children’s literature, an age that corresponds to the height of British industry, empire, and economic power. We will first read this literature with the goal of understanding its diverse representations of children, childhood, and the homes or domestic spheres with which they are associated. Then we will read this literature with the goal of understanding the ways history, and especially the history of British empire, conquest, and expansion away from home, manifests itself in what is supposedly a light-hearted, popular genre. Identifying and addressing the ethical questions that arise from the juxtaposition of these concerns—children and “home” with empire and “away”—will be an important component of our work in the class.

The Story of the Book

FY-101-EN05 G. Germek
Day and Time: MTH 2:50-4:10

Description:

Are books really dead? Are libraries dinosaurs? Will iPads and e-readers wipe out everything from newspapers to textbooks? Find out with The Story of the Book, a course that examines the ceaseless saga of written communication and preservation of knowledge from antiquity through to the 21st century. You’ll be introduced to our rich and diverse print culture, and examine the creation, production, distribution, and reception of books and their forms–from ancient clay tablets and Medieval manuscripts to novels, e-books, modern e-text readers, and works designed solely for the iPad. Traditional classroom instruction will be accompanied by regular visits to the Monmouth University Library’s Special Collections Reading Room, where you’ll be offered a holistic opportunity to touch and feel real works made of animal skin, ancient paper, and illuminated manuscript leaves adorned with gold and lapis lazuli. You’ll work closely with precursors to the modern novel, rare books, modern graphic novels, Harlequin romances, and tales designed exclusively for e-readers. You’ll take a trip to the Morgan Library in NYC to view one of the finest medieval manuscripts collections anywhere.

The Working World: College and Transition

FY-101-EN06 J. Mantle
Day and Time: WF 10:05-11:25

Description:

This course will examine and analyze our perceptions of the working world: what does “work” actually mean? How can we make our eventual work successful? How can we make our employment part of an overall goal for life satisfaction? We will also examine the pre-existing assumptions about work, employment, and college. Does college “only” prepare one for the working world? If not, what other purposes does it serve? What might certain literary works tell us about American assumptions about work, class, labor, and college life? In recent history, we have seen the fallout of troubling issues surrounding Wall Street and corporate practices. How can we understand the ethics around these issues? What impact do these practices have on ordinary Americans? We will entertain these questions, as well as examine more pragmatic considerations, such as study skills, time management skills, stress management skills, and life skills.

Caribbean Voices: Language, Culture and Identity

FY-101-FO01 P. Humphrey
Day and Time: MTH 2:50-4:10

Description:

Explore the islands of the Caribbean through art, music, literature and film. In this course, you will become familiar with the English-, Spanish- and French-speaking Caribbean and examine diversity in language, race, religion and gender identity politics across the region. Bringing your learning and personal experience to bear on these art forms, you will develop important cultural understanding of a region that is ever more important in tourism, trade and politics, knowledge that will prepare you for discussions of these key issues in U.S. society and beyond. Course taught in English. Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will be used to pay for a workshop and/or museum visit about Caribbean cultures and popular art in either New York City or Philadelphia. The fee will cover the costs of transportation and admission.

Gain a Competitive Advantage: Learn about Hispanics in Business

FY-101-FS01 F. Cipriani
Day and Time: WF 10:05-11:25

Description:

Enhance your business knowledge with a globalized and multicultural perspective of the U.S. market and workforce. In this course, you will learn important commercial and cultural information about the Hispanic population of more than 50 million in the United States. With case studies, news articles, readings and guest speakers, you will gain an important understanding of Hispanics in business that will help you in your future career.

Animals, Life, Death, Kindness and Sin

FY-101-HE01 C. Hirschler
Day and Time: MW 11:40-1:00

Description:

“Animals, Life, Death, Kindness and Sin” will introduce students to the varied and complex ways in which animals contribute to human well-being and illness. Students will expand their understanding of the biological, social, psychological, environmental, occupational, spiritual, and cultural implications associated with the use of, and relationships with, animals. Students will critically examine cultural beliefs and practices that impact the well-being of humans, animals, and the planet.Lab Fee: The lab fee for this course will cover the cost associated with a required background check mandated by the Monmouth County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (MCSPCA) for all volunteer applicants.

Introduction to Health Occupations

FY-101-HE02 J. Schaaff
Day and Time: WF 10:05-11:25

Description:

This course will introduce students to careers in the field of health, with an emphasis on stress management for both the practitioner and the patient. Through classroom lecture, discussions, readings, and research, students will examine various health care professions, education and training requirements, as well as various ethical issues. Students will also be introduced to college life at Monmouth University and participate in various campus events as they learn how to be successful in college.

Addiction in Popular Movies

FY-101-HE03 L. Jannone
Day and Time: MTH 1:15-2:35

Description:

This First Year Seminar introduces students to the history of addiction as portrayed in popular movies. Movies will be watched that portray different types of addiction starting with the Days of Wine and Roses made in 1962 and ending with Requiem for a Dream (2000) . Some documentaries will also be examined. Students will write papers and discuss the various types of addictions seen in the various movies. Also the personality of the addict will be explored in each movie. These movies will be used to help understand the theory of addiction. Legal and ethical concerns, as well as historical issues are examined. Treatment modalities will be explored.

History and Hollywood

FY-101-HS01 M. Ziobro
Day and Time: TF 8:30-9:50

Description:

This course explores the relationship between film and history in the United States. We will consider how filmmakers have presented people, places, and events in historic context and evaluate their effectiveness in communicating the essence of the period and the particulars of their subject. Major areas of analysis will include politics, war, gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and national identity. Working with monographs, scholarly articles, primary sources, and the movies themselves we will explore the benefits and challenges of movie makers as historians and interrogate the role of movies in American history.

History and Hollywood

FY-101-HS02 M. Ziobro
Day and Time: WF 10:05-11:25

Description:

This course explores the relationship between film and history in the United States. We will consider how filmmakers have presented people, places, and events in historic context and evaluate their effectiveness in communicating the essence of the period and the particulars of their subject. Major areas of analysis will include politics, war, gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and national identity. Working with monographs, scholarly articles, primary sources, and the movies themselves we will explore the benefits and challenges of movie makers as historians and interrogate the role of movies in American history.

The 1960’s in American History and Culture

FY-101-HS04 H. Williams
Day and Time: MW 11:40-1:00

Description:

This course is an examination of American history and popular culture in the 1960s. With an emphasis on historical studies, this seminar style class will involve a discussion of film, literature, art, music, youth culture, drug culture, and social activism amid the backdrop of the Vietnam War. The ethical issues related to the events in this pivotal era and popular historical personalities of the ‘60s generation will be critically discussed and used as a platform to introduce students to concerns pertaining to college life.

The Beatles

FY-101-HS05 K. Campbell
Day and Time: MW 4:30-5:50

Description:

This course explores the historical and cultural context for the rise of the Beatles and the impact that the group and its music had on the history of the 1960s and beyond. We will examine the ways in which the Beatles were shaped by and shaped their times, particularly considering the group in the context of post-war Britain and Europe and the vast cultural changes that occurred in Britain and the United States during the 1960s.

A Journey to St. Petersburg, Russia: A City of Transformations

FY-101-HS06 T. Pearson
Day and Time: MTH 2:50-4:10

Description:

This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to one of the great cities of the world—St. Petersburg, Russia. It will explore its transformations and changing identities since its founding in 1703 by Peter the Great and its legacy of human endurance and cultural brilliance. Through their engagement with the history, literature, architecture, art, music and film of St. Petersburg, students will understand the unusual spatial and environmental character of the city and the five stages of its historical development, each with its own identity: Peter the Great’s “window on the West” in the eighteenth century; the administrative and cultural epicenter of the Russian empire in the nineteenth century; the birthplace and citadel of the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917; the “Hero City” Leningrad that survived the Nazi siege and blockade of World War II (the Great Patriotic War to Russians); and the “second city” and leading business development zone in post-Soviet Russia.

Numbers, Clocks & Secret Codes

FY-101-MA01 M. Chrisman
Day and Time: TTH 4:30-5:50

Description:

This First Year Seminar will study the applications of mathematics to various types of codes, including identification numbers, check digit schemes, and selected methods of cryptography. Modular, or “clock”, arithmetic will be developed so as to greatly increase the number of meaningful examples that can be covered. The impact of cryptography on history and society will also be explored. Students will be instructed on the academic expectations of college, and on how to best achieve these expectations. Additional aspects of college life will be the subject of readings and discussions.

Ethics in College and Beyond

FY-101-PL01 G. Gonzalez
Day and Time: WF 10:05-11:25

Description:

This class will be an introduction to ethics with a particular focus on some of the most interesting and challenging ethical issues that confront a first year college student. We will use a case study approach to make abstract ethical theories more meaningful. The study of ethics that you do in this class will make you a more thoughtful and capable college student, and it will also prepare you for a more fulfilling life after you graduate.

An Unexamined Life is Not Worth Living

FY-101-PL02 O. Agbajoh-Laoye
Day and Time: MW 11:40-1:00

Description:

The Philosophy, Religion and Interdisciplinary Studies First Year Seminar recognizes the importance of stimulating students’ learning curiosity and to give them a foundation for transition to university life. The course will engage our students a) with an understanding of Philosophy, Religion and Interdisciplinary Studies, as a way of life and expression, b) with a variety of topics and c) by addressing issues related to first-year students: Academic, Ethics, and Transition. Philosophy is the source from which all other disciplines spring. It gives the skills to be successful through critical thinking. It allows students to make sense of their world and enhances proficiency for future careers like politics, law, banking, business, medicine, science and others. The philosophical emphasis on questions as, “Who am I,” “Where I come from,” “What should I do,” “Where am I going,” etc., train us to live an overall richer, fuller and more rewarding life.

Profiles in Courage: Youth, Citizenship and Public Policy

FY-101-PS01 S. Chapman
Day and Time: TTH 10:05-11:25, 8:30-9:50

Description:

Since the days when Socrates was accused of corrupting the youth, to President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration speech calling for public service, the role of the youth as citizens has been an important aspect of public life. Engaging citizens in debates about public policy issues is an effective way to raise awareness about political issues. The purpose of this course is to highlight the importance of awareness of public policy issues and their ethical underpinnings as fundamental to political participation by citizens in a democracy.

Health Psychology

FY-101-PY01 M. Van Volkom
Day and Time: MW 8:30-9:50

Description:

This course will focus on the aspects of health psychology that are most relevant to a first year college student. These aspects include avoiding dependence on alcohol and tobacco, making good choices when it comes to nutrition and exercise, managing stress, maintaining healthy relationships, and taking steps toward good financial health during this important transitional period in a young adult’s life. In addition, this course will utilize various activities and assignments that are designed to help students with the transition to college in general, and to Monmouth University specifically. Transition topics include study skills, avoidance of plagiarism, and using the University library.

Health Psychology

FY-101-PY02 M. Van Volkom
Day and Time: TF 8:30-9:50

Description:

This course will focus on the aspects of health psychology that are most relevant to a first year college student. These aspects include avoiding dependence on alcohol and tobacco, making good choices when it comes to nutrition and exercise, managing stress, maintaining healthy relationships, and taking steps toward good financial health during this important transitional period in a young adult’s life. In addition, this course will utilize various activities and assignments that are designed to help students with the transition to college in general, and to Monmouth University specifically. Transition topics include study skills, avoidance of plagiarism, and using the University library.

Resistance is Futile: Social Influence in Everyday Life

FY-101-PY03 J. Nye
Day and Time: TF 8:30-9:50

Description:

We live in a society that celebrates the individual; our cultural heroes are made up of revolutionaries, nonconformists, and trouble makers. At the same time, each of us feels incredible pressure to conform to the expectations and values of our society. How do we live under the pressure of these two competing forces? Somehow we manage. This course will focus on how humans walk this fine line every day, bending to the will of social forces at times and resisting them at others–and sometimes contributing to these forces, ourselves. Course readings and activities will focus on what social scientists have learned about the powerful social forces that shape humans in both positive and negative directions. These social forces will also be examined in terms of how they affect the lives of college students. In particular, we will note the academic, social, personal, and professional transformation that occurs in you as you integrate yourself into the Monmouth University community.

Psychology for (College) Life

FY-101-PY04 J. Goodwin-Uhler
Day and Time: WF 10:05-11:25

Description:

The First Year of college is full of new experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. This seminar will explore these experiences through the lens of psychological research and theory. Course readings, activities, and discussion will place a special emphasis on how contemporary and classic psychological science applies to your First Year, and how becoming educated about psychology can improve the college experience. Our discussion will focus on specific topics such as: stress, motivation, improving memory, the importance of money, picking a career, social influences, social cognition, sexuality, and happiness. We will place special emphasis on the self (including self-concept and self-esteem), as well as close relationships. The common theme for all of these topics is how we can use scholarly research in psychology to improve our everyday lives.

Psychology for (College) Life

FY-101-PY05 J. Goodwin-Uhler
Day and Time: WF 1:15-2:35

Description:

The First Year of college is full of new experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. This seminar will explore these experiences through the lens of psychological research and theory. Course readings, activities, and discussion will place a special emphasis on how contemporary and classic psychological science applies to your First Year, and how becoming educated about psychology can improve the college experience. Our discussion will focus on specific topics such as: stress, motivation, improving memory, the importance of money, picking a career, social influences, social cognition, sexuality, and happiness. We will place special emphasis on the self (including self-concept and self-esteem), as well as close relationships. The common theme for all of these topics is how we can use scholarly research in psychology to improve our everyday lives.

Humans and the Environment

FY-101-SC01 C. Duckett
H. Estes
Day and Time: WF 1:15-2:35

Description:

This course introduces contemporary environmental issues from humanities perspectives. It asks students to think about ethical issues involved in human relationships with animals and the land, to take on a (small) environmentally focused project for the semester, and to think about how that action interacts with course materials.

Creating Software Animations

FY-101-SE01 N. Diallo
Day and Time: MTH 10:05-11:25

Description:

This course provides a broad overview of the Computer Science and Software Engineering disciplines and prepares students for technology and software-oriented courses that they may take by teaching them how to develop software animations that are closely related to gaming and motion picture animation. Topics covered include programming concepts and object-oriented design, animation programming, computer architecture, programming languages, compilers, operating systems and problem solving in the context of software. The course will also sharpen higher-level academic skills, enhance awareness of professionalism and ethical issues, and facilitate a successful transition to university life. Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will cover the cost for regular maintenance/upgrades for laboratory computers needed to run the animation programming software.

Peace Corps: Experience and Serve the World

FY-101-SO01 F. Cipriani
Day and Time: TF 8:30-9:50

Description:

Are you interested in living in another country and learning about other cultures? Have you ever thought about joining the Peace Corps? This class will teach you about the history and goals of the Peace Corps, the work volunteers do around the world, and how to prepare yourself for global service. Taught by the Coordinator of the Peace Corps Preparatory Program, the course will focus on the historical, cultural, economic and political landscape of the Peace Corps. Students will explore their career goals and their understanding of culture, work on a semester-long community development project, research countries served by the Peace Corps, and interview a Peace Corps Volunteer. Students will also learn about the rich resources offered through Monmouth University’s comprehensive academic, social, and professional opportunities.

Experiences of Childhood and Adolescence

FY-101-SW01 C. Hogan
Day and Time: TTH, 10:05-11:25, 8:30-9:50

Description:

This course will examine issues related to childhood and adolescence. A central focus will be on how children and adolescents confront the issues that face them, as well as ethical concerns in working with children and adolescents. A central theme will be how to create the conditions in which children and youth can increase resilience. This course will also introduce the student to the University community, with special emphasis on resources, responsibilities and ethics.

Social Connectedness in the Age of Technology

FY-101-SW02 S. Ragudaran
Day and Time: MW 8:30-9:50

Description:

This course will examine issues related to social intelligence. A central focus will be on how social intelligence is developed from childhood through adulthood and why it is important to understand and develop, as well as ethical concerns in working with people who have difficulty with developing social relationships. A central theme will be how to create the conditions in which encourage and support the growth of social intelligence. This course will also introduce the student to the University community, with special emphasis on resources, responsibilities and ethics.

Arts at Monmouth University

FY-101-TH01 S. Anderson
Day and Time: TF 11:40-1:00

Description:

This course explores the various artistic offerings at Monmouth University. Students will attend concerts, plays, and gallery exhibits in an effort to better understand the various artistic and entertainment options available at Monmouth. This is not a performance class, but rather an opportunity to hear, see, feel, and experience Monmouth University’s thriving arts scene.

Arts at Monmouth University

FY-101-TH02 S. Anderson
Day and Time: WF 1:15-2:35

Description:

This course explores the various artistic offerings at Monmouth University. Students will attend concerts, plays, and gallery exhibits in an effort to better understand the various artistic and entertainment options available at Monmouth. This is not a performance class, but rather an opportunity to hear, see, feel, and experience Monmouth University’s thriving arts scene.