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11609

General Education

Previous Courses: Fall 2012

Fall 2012: First Year Seminar Available Courses

Course Title Course Number Professor

Great Excavations: the Archaeology of the Ancient World

FY-101-AN01 R. Veit
Day and Time: MTH 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

The course is a first-year seminar that examines how archaeologists study and interpret the ancient world. Ancient societies from North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe are examined. Students are introduced to the ethical challenges that face archaeologists and to how archaeologists separate fact from fiction.

Zombies: Social Anxiety & Pop Culture

FY-101-AN02 E. Gonzalez-Tennant
Day and Time: MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course will introduce students to the discipline of anthropology by examining how human beings deal with social anxiety as expressed through references to one particular manifestation of the undead. Zombies have traditionally represented a state in which human beings interact with the world around them, but lack any form of recognizable consciousness or free will. Students will develop critical thinking skills concerning topics in anthropology, visual studies, religious studies, science, politics, and economics. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary discipline of anthropology through a structured analysis of popular culture in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Weekly readings will combine popular writings with academic chapters and articles to explore core anthropological topics.

Playbooks and Checkbooks: An Introduction to the Economics of Sports

FY-101-BE50 P. O’Halloran
Day and Time: TTH 7:25-8:40PM

Description:

This course is an exploration of the history, economics and business of professional and amateur sports. Although this course mainly focuses on the economics of sports, we will trace the history and development of modern sports from the Olympics of ancient Greece to the multibillion dollar professional sports industry of today. Furthermore, we will investigate the organization of leagues and their market structures as well as government policy with regard to the regulation of sports. We will also explore the labor market for sports professionals and determine if players are worth the tremendous amounts many of them receive, evaluate labor-management relations, and the link between performance and pay. We will also consider many ethical issues in modern sports as well as potential future developments and explore the role of sports in the modern global economy. Lastly, we will explore the pivotal role played by modern media and the “professionalization” of collegiate sports.

The Law and Your Life

FY-101-BL01 P. Reinhart
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

As first year students, many have recently reached the age of 18. As legal adults, they are now subject to all the laws that affect all people age 18 or over. This course will introduce students to the basic laws that will impact them during their college years and beyond. It will also address the ethical issues of transitioning from a high school student to a university student, as well as a member of society. The course will cover the fundamental laws relating to the expected major events in their personal lives from their first year in college until death including constitutional rights, privacy rights, contracts, crimes, torts, buying or renting a home, marital rights and obligations, borrowing and investing, taxes, employment, insurance, consumer rights and estate administration. Guest speakers will participate in class who are practicing lawyers, judges, and others who deal with all aspects of the law as it affects students as citizens.

From Our Classroom to Your Boardroom – Necessary Business Skills

FY-101-BM01 N. Hart
Day and Time: T 10:00-11:15AM
TH 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine various approaches on how to use your knowledge and maximize its application to college life, the outside world and your future at Monmouth University. We will utilize a series of tasks that must be performed well to insure the success of any student in an entrepreneurial setting.

From Our Classroom to Your Boardroom – Necessary Business Skills

FY-101-BM02 N. Hart
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine various approaches on how to use your knowledge and maximize its application to college life, the outside world and your future at Monmouth University. We will utilize a series of tasks that must be performed well to insure the success of any student in an entrepreneurial setting.

From Our Classroom to Your Boardroom – Necessary Business Skills

FY-101-BM50 J. Buzza
C. DeStefano
Day and Time: TH 6:00-8:45PM

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine various approaches on how to use your knowledge and maximize its application to college life, the outside world and your future at Monmouth University. We will utilize a series of tasks that must be performed well to insure the success of any student in an entrepreneurial setting.

Encounters with Unseen Life

FY-101-BY01 K. Lionetti
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

Encounters with Unseen Life is a first year seminar course designed to introduce students to college life at Monmouth University and to the field of biology. Students will become familiar with resources provided by Monmouth University to help them with all aspects of their college life. They will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college as well as ethical issues pertaining to the field of biology. Students will learn about basic biology and microbiology through readings, discussions, assignments and laboratory demonstrations. Students will participate in various University functions as they learn to how to be successful in college. They will become familiar with the academic culture of biologists.

Dinosaurs and DNA: Biology in the Movies

FY-101-BY02 D. Lobo
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

Dinosaurs and DNA: Biology in the Movies is designed to introduce students to college life at Monmouth University and to the field of biology. Students will become familiar with resources provided by Monmouth University to help them with all aspects of their college life. They will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college as well as ethical issues pertaining to the field of biology. Students will learn about basic aspects of genetics (inheritance), cloning, and genetic engineering through readings, discussions, and assignments related to popular movies (GATTACA, Jurassic Park). Students will participate in various University functions as they learn how to be successful in college. They will become familiar with the academic culture of biologists.

Science Superheroes

FY-101-CE01 W. Schreiber
Day and Time: MW 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

Using the Nobel Prize as a focal point, the course will explore aspects of science with emphasis on the processes of scientific research, as well as critical thinking, interpretation and ethics in the sciences. In addition, the course will include orientation to Monmouth University and its resources (academic and non-academic), as well as aspects of personal and career development.

Global Aspects of Crime

FY-101-CJ01 A. Jamison
B. Sever
Day and Time: MW 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

This course takes a comparative look at varying legal cultures and their differing strategies taken to combat crime in the United States and nations abroad. This course also provides academic, personal and career development for students, including an orientation to Monmouth University and its resources.

Global Aspects of Crime

FY-101-CJ02 A. Jamison
B. Sever
Day and Time: MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course takes a comparative look at varying legal cultures and their differing strategies taken to combat crime in the United States and nations abroad. This course also provides academic, personal and career development for students, including an orientation to Monmouth University and its resources.

Mass Media and Popular Culture

FY-101-CO01 D. Dolphin
Day and Time: TH 10:00AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course addresses the ways in which mass media affects the creation of a popular culture in our society, and how that popular culture impacts the values of the society in return. This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience. Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engaging in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practicing their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem solving skills.

What’s So Funny? An Inquiry into the Nature and Function of Humor

FY-101-CO02 M. Phillips-Anderson
Day and Time: TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

E.B. White said “Humor can be dissected, as a frog can, but the thing dies in the process and the innards are discouraging to any but the pure scientific mind.” We will attempt to prove Mr. White incorrect. Humor may be the most human of activities, yet it is scarcely understood. This First Year Seminar will be a humanistic inquiry into the nature and functions of humor and laughter. We will explore philosophical, communicative, physiological, and cultural perspectives on humor and laughter. We will discuss issues related to the transition between high school and college and, with any luck, find some laughter in the process.

Food, Communication, Culture, and Performance

FY-101-CO03 D. Shoemaker
Day and Time: TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

The purpose of this seminar-style course is to explore topics of particular interest to first-year university students. We will explore how we use food to communicate personal identity, relationships, cultures, and politics. We will also examine the intersections of food, communication, ethics, and health issues across texts and practices: through published stories, advertising, cooking shows, and cookbooks; through interactions including conversations, demonstrations, and performances; and through preparing, sharing, and eating food.

Bueller?…Bueller?…Bueller?: John Hughes and Your First Year

FY-101-CO04 A. Furgason
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

To give students a deeper appreciation of how and why the medium of film influences modern man along with the technical elements of the craft of filmmaking…specifically in the films of John Hughes (The Breakfast Club, 16 Candles,Pretty in Pink). The class examines how Hughes childhood and cultural influences impacted his filmmaking. Students will become familiar with the major theories of the screen arts. An introductory understanding of semiotics will be achieved, which will allow the student to read individual artifacts of the screen as text. Skills in critique and analysis will be emphasized. The student who successfully completes this course will have begun to develop a ‘critical eye’ for the interpretation and analysis of the screen arts, as well as the language for critical discussion thereof.

Hollywood’s Journalism: the Image of Journalists and Journalism in Popular Culture

FY-101-CO05 M. Vujnovic
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

This seminar-style course explores representations of journalism and journalists (public relations practitioners, publicists) in Hollywood movies. Selection of the movies ranges from the 1920s to the present taking into account various historical perspectives. The course will also address sharpening higher-level academic skills, enhancing awareness of ethical issues, and making a successful transition to university life.

Communication in Relationships: Personal, Social, and Professional Relationships

FY-101-CO06 S. Hokanson
Day and Time: TF 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

This course addresses the development, maintenance, and termination of personal, social, and professional relationships in our lives. This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience. Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engaging in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practicing their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem solving skills.

Evil and Human Cruelty

FY-101-EDL01 J. Barr
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

The focus of this course is to explore religious, psychological, philosophical, and biological theories of evil, with a specific focus on the origins of evil behavior in humans. This course will also explore the myths of evil including the notion that evil is a common occurrence, how evil doers believe their behavior is justified, and what many scholars have called the banality of evil.

Neverlands: Children’s Literature of the Golden Age

FY-101-EN01 K. Bluemel
Day and Time: TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course asks you to engage in serious study of some of the most beloved texts written in English for children in the 19th and early 20th centuries, from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland to Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island and Kenneth Grahame’s Wind in the Willows. Since the field of children’s literature is too vast for us to attempt to examine it in full, we will limit ourselves to study of representative texts of English literature that scholars recognize today as “Golden Age” children’s literature, an age that corresponds to the height of British industry, empire, and economic power. We will first read this literature with the goal of understanding its diverse representations of children, childhood, and the homes or domestic spheres with which they are associated. Then we will read this literature with the goal of understanding the ways history, and especially the history of British empire, conquest, and expansion away from home, manifests itself in what is supposedly a light-hearted, popular genre. Identifying and addressing the ethical questions that arise from the juxtaposition of these concerns – children and “home” with empire and “away” – will be an important component of our work in the class.

The Story of the Book

FY-101-EN03 G. Germek
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

Are books really dead? Are libraries dinosaurs? Will iPads and e-readers wipe out everything from newspapers to textbooks? Find out with The Story of the Book, a course that examines the ceaseless saga of written communication and preservation of knowledge from antiquity through to the 21st century. You’ll be introduced to our rich and diverse print culture, and examine the creation, production, distribution, and reception of books and their forms – from ancient clay tablets and Medieval manuscripts to novels, e-books, modern e-text readers, and works designed solely for the iPad. Traditional classroom instruction will be accompanied by regular visits to the Monmouth University Library’s Special Collections Reading Room, where you’ll be offered a holistic opportunity to touch and feel real works made of animal skin, ancient paper, and illuminated manuscript leaves adorned with gold and lapis lazuli. You’ll work closely with precursors to the modern novel, rare books, modern graphic novels, Harlequin romances, and tales designed exclusively for e-readers.

Gain a Competitive Advantage: Learn about Hispanics in Business

FY-101-FO01 J. Riordan-Goncalves
Day and Time: WF 1:00-2:15PM

Description:

Enhance your business knowledge with a globalized and multicultural perspective of the U.S. market and workforce. In this course, you will learn important commercial and cultural information about the Hispanic population of more than 50 million in the United States. With case studies, news articles, readings and guest speakers, you will gain an important understanding of Hispanics in business that will help you in your future career.

Introduction to Health Occupations

FY-101-HE01 L. Kelly
Day and Time: TF 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

Introduction to Health Occupations is a first year seminar course designed to introduce students to college life at Monmouth University and careers in the field of health. Students will become familiar with resources provided by Monmouth University to help them with all aspects of their college life. They will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college as well as ethical issues pertaining to health occupations. Through classroom lecture, discussions, reading and research, students will examine health care professions and professional organizations and investigate the education and training requirements in order to become a health care professional. Students will also participate in various University functions as they learn to how to be successful in college.

Tea Appreciation

FY-101-HE02 J. Konopack
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

Attention tea lovers! In this seminar, we will explore the history, art, and science of tea. You will drink dozens of teas throughout the semester as you take part in class discussions and activities that are designed to help you feel right at home at MU. Join us!

Animals, Life, Death, Kindness and Sin

FY-101-HE03 C. Hirschler
Day and Time: TF 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

Animals, Life, Death, Kindness, and Sin will introduce students to the varied and complex ways in which animals contribute to human well-being and illness. Students will expand their understanding of the biological, social, psychological, environmental, occupational, spiritual, and cultural implications associated with the use of, and relationships with, animals. Students will critically examine cultural beliefs and practices that impact the well-being of humans, animals, and the planet. Students will be required to provide service for approximately 6 hours at the MCSPCA (located 2 miles from campus) as “cat socializers” or Thrift Store workers. Students must be available for training and service hours at the MCSPCA on 3 Saturdays in mid-September to early October. This service learning experience will engage students in the community, facilitate deep learning, and provide an opportunity to bond with non-human animals and classmates.

Addiction in Popular Movies

FY-101-HE04 L. Jannone
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This First Year Seminar introduces students to the history of addiction as portrayed in popular movies. Movies will be watched that portray different types of addiction starting with the Days of Wine and Roses made in 1962 and ending with Requiem for a Dream (2000) . Some documentaries will also be examined. Students will write papers and discuss the various types of addictions seen in the various movies. Also the personality of the addict will be explored in each movie. These movies will be used to help understand the theory of addiction. Legal and ethical concerns, as well as historical issues are examined. Treatment modalities will be explored.

The Ancient World in Contemporary Imagination

FY-101-HS01 J. Li
Day and Time: T 10:00-11:15AM
TH 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

From national histories to museum installations to the Super Bowl half time show, the ancient world continues to play a role in contemporary society. These images and narratives of the past are creations that often reveal more about our present than our understanding of the past. This course examines how scholarly and popular visions of the ancient past are created, transmitted and used in contemporary society from politics to popular culture.

Remembering Us: Children of the Holocaust

FY-101-HS03 S. Douglass
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

The Holocaust stands out in historical memory as a time when the ethical and moral fabric of society was torn apart as the Nazis spread extermination Anti-Semitism throughout Europe. “Remembering Us: Children of the Holocaust” will study this tragic era through the eyes of Jewish children who were caught up in Hitler’s agenda of genocide. A unique part of this course will be the oral history component enabling each student to interview an eye-witness to this era, a child survivor of the Holocaust.

The Afghanistan and Iraq Wars

FY-101-HS04 C. DeRosa
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

In this First Year Seminar, students will study the history of America’s wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, especially in the contexts of counterinsurgency warfare and western-Middle Eastern relations. They will practice staying informed about the wars through a variety of news sources.

The Beautiful Game: How Soccer Explains the World

FY-101-HS05 M. Rhett
Day and Time: MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

The Beautiful Game will examine the history of soccer as an agent of change, by specifically looking at questions related to: culture, identity, imperialism/globalization, ethics, economics, sport/physicality, religion, politics, and society.

Numbers, Clocks, and Secret Codes

FY-101-MA01 M. Chrisman
Day and Time: MTH 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This First Year Seminar will study the applications of mathematics to various types of codes, including identification numbers, check digit schemes, and selected methods of cryptography. Modular, or “clock”, arithmetic will be developed so as to greatly increase the number of meaningful examples that can be covered. The impact of cryptography on history and society will also be explored. Students will be instructed on the academic expectations of college, and on how to best achieve these expectations. Additional aspects of college life will be the subject of readings and discussions.

Numbers, Clocks, and Secret Codes

FY-101-MA02 S. Marshall
Day and Time: MW 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

This First Year Seminar will study the applications of mathematics to various types of codes, including identification numbers, check digit schemes, and selected methods of cryptography. Modular, or “clock”, arithmetic will be developed so as to greatly increase the number of meaningful examples that can be covered. The impact of cryptography on history and society will also be explored. Students will be instructed on the academic expectations of college, and on how to best achieve these expectations. Additional aspects of college life will be the subject of readings and discussions.

Ethics in College and Beyond

FY-101-PL01 G. Gonzalez
Day and Time: MTH 01:00PM 02:15PM

Description:

This class will be an introduction to ethics with a particular focus on some of the most interesting and challenging ethical issues that confront a first year college student. We will use a case study approach to make abstract ethical theories more meaningful. The study of ethics that you do in this class will make you a more thoughtful and capable college student, and it will also prepare you for a more fulfilling life after you graduate.

Ethics in College and Beyond

FY-101-PL02 G. Gonzalez
Day and Time: MTH 02:30PM 03:45PM

Description:

This class will be an introduction to ethics with a particular focus on some of the most interesting and challenging ethical issues that confront a first year college student. We will use a case study approach to make abstract ethical theories more meaningful. The study of ethics that you do in this class will make you a more thoughtful and capable college student, and it will also prepare you for a more fulfilling life after you graduate.

I Fought the Law and I Won: Debating Legal Rights in the 21st Century

FY101-PS01 G. Bordelon
Day and Time: MTH 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

Aristotle’s Politics argues that political debate is the most highly valued political skill because it is through debate that we are able to carry reason into action. Debate is the public vehicle by which we make decisions that impact all members of society. Debates echo in the halls of Congress, in trial courts across the land, and in executive offices, because it is through the art of debate that we are able to test the veracity of what we believe to be true. Some even believe it is better to debate questions without settling them than it is to settle questions without debating them. This first-year seminar course blends an emphasis on legal principles associated with American Civil Liberties with the art of Policy Debate in an attempt to help build honest and competent leaders at Monmouth University.

I Fought the Law and I Won: Debating Legal Rights in the 21st Century

FY101-PS02 G. Bordelon
Day and Time: MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

Aristotle’s Politics argues that political debate is the most highly valued political skill because it is through debate that we are able to carry reason into action. Debate is the public vehicle by which we make decisions that impact all members of society. Debates echo in the halls of Congress, in trial courts across the land, and in executive offices, because it is through the art of debate that we are able to test the veracity of what we believe to be true. Some even believe it is better to debate questions without settling them than it is to settle questions without debating them. This first-year seminar course blends an emphasis on legal principles associated with American Civil Liberties with the art of Policy Debate in an attempt to help build honest and competent leaders at Monmouth University.

Debating Globalization: Feeding a Hungry World

FY-101-PS03 R. Datta
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

Food is our fundamental right; it also provides a gateway to understanding the world. The world produces enough food for everyone, yet close to a billion people in the world are malnourished; about 15% of American households face food shortage. Why is this happening? Furthermore, in a changing world, often referred to as McDonaldization, people around the world are exposed to fast food chains. Is this having an impact on the traditional foods in different cultures? Students will debate such questions and also learn about famines, how people used innovative techniques to find food at times of political and economic crises, how climate change, and the politics and economics of food distribution affect food supply. Students in this course will have the opportunity to share the role of family and community bondages through festival and heritage foods, family recipes, nutritional benefits of certain traditional foods, spices, and herbs, and how we can maintain and enrich intercultural understanding through food. At the end of the semester, students will present a ‘Heritage Hunger Banquet’ to spread awareness about the importance of cultural, political, and economic aspects of hunger in a globalized world.

Debating Globalization

FY-101-PS04 T. Lamatsch
Day and Time: TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

Globalization and its political and economic dimensions are the focus of this first year seminar. Four thematic sections represent the core of the course – (1) International Political Economy, (2) Security, (3) Environment and Public Health, and (4) Democracy, Demography and Social Issues. Engaging students in debates about globalization is an effective way to raise awareness of the challenges and opportunities that their generation will face. The purpose of this course is to highlight how globalization processes (economic and political) raise important ethnical issues for different peoples, groups, nation-states and institutions.

Health Psychology

FY-101-PY01 M. Van Volkom
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

This course will focus on the aspects of health psychology that are most relevant to a first year college student. These aspects include avoiding dependence on alcohol and tobacco, making good choices when it comes to nutrition and exercise, managing stress, maintaining healthy relationships, and taking steps toward good financial health during this important transitional period in a young adult’s life. In addition, this course will utilize various activities and assignments that are designed to help students with the transition to college in general, and to Monmouth University specifically. Transition topics include study skills, avoidance of plagiarism, and using the University library.

Resistance is Futile? Social Influence in Everyday Life

FY-101-PY02 J. Nye
Day and Time: TF 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

We live in a society that celebrates the individual; our cultural heroes are made up of revolutionaries, nonconformists, and trouble makers. At the same time, each of us feels incredible pressure to conform to the expectations and values of our society. How do we live under the pressure of these two competing forces? Somehow we manage. This course will focus on how humans walk this fine line every day, bending to the will of social forces at times and resisting them at others–and sometimes contributing to these forces, ourselves. Course readings and activities will focus on what social scientists have learned about the powerful social forces that shape humans in both positive and negative directions. These social forces will also be examined in terms of how they affect the lives of college students. In particular, we will note the academic, social, personal, and professional transformation that occurs in you as you integrate yourself into the Monmouth University community.

Psychology for (College) Life

FY-101-PY03 J. Goodwin
Day and Time: TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

The First Year of college is full of new experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. This seminar will explore these experiences through the lens of psychological research and theory. Course readings, activities, and discussion will place a special emphasis on how contemporary and classic psychological science applies to your First Year, and how becoming educated about psychology can improve the college experience. Our discussion will focus on specific topics such as: stress, motivation, improving memory, the importance of money, picking a career, social influences, social cognition, sexuality, and happiness. We will place special emphasis on the self (including self-concept and self-esteem), as well as close relationships. The common theme for all of these topics is how we can use scholarly research in psychology to improve our everyday lives.

Psychology for (College) Life

FY-101-PY04 J. Goodwin
Day and Time: TF 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

The First Year of college is full of new experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. This seminar will explore these experiences through the lens of psychological research and theory. Course readings, activities, and discussion will place a special emphasis on how contemporary and classic psychological science applies to your First Year, and how becoming educated about psychology can improve the college experience. Our discussion will focus on specific topics such as: stress, motivation, improving memory, the importance of money, picking a career, social influences, social cognition, sexuality, and happiness. We will place special emphasis on the self (including self-concept and self-esteem), as well as close relationships. The common theme for all of these topics is how we can use scholarly research in psychology to improve our everyday lives.

Creating Software Animations

FY-101-SE01 A. Milewski
Day and Time: MTH 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This course provides a broad overview of the Computer Science and Software Engineering disciplines and prepares students for technology and software-oriented courses that they may take by teaching them how to develop software animations that are closely related to gaming and motion picture animation. Topics covered include programming concepts and object-oriented design, animation programming, computer architecture, programming languages, compilers, operating systems and problem solving in the context of software. The course will also sharpen higher-level academic skills, enhance awareness of professionalism and ethical issues, and facilitate a successful transition to university life.

Beyond Timbuktu: A Journey through West Africa

FY-101-SO01 N. Mezey
Day and Time: TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

Come take an intellectual and malaria-free journey to West Africa. In this course we will be weaving together academics, ethics, and a transition to college by focusing on the historical, cultural, economic, and political landscape of both West Africa and Monmouth University. Drawing on university resources, academic texts, and the professor’s personal experiences of living in Mali as a Peace Corps Volunteer, students will learn about how and why the region of West Africa is economically poor, politically in transition, and culturally rich. Students will also learn about the rich resources offered through Monmouth University’s comprehensive academic, social, and professional opportunities.

Experiences of Childhood and Adolescence

FY-101-SW01 K. Ward
Day and Time: T 10:00-11:15AM
TH 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

This course will examine issues related to childhood and adolescence. A central focus will be on how children and adolescents confront the issues that face them, as well as ethical concerns in working with children and adolescents. A central theme will be how to create the conditions in which children and youth can increase resilience. This course will also introduce the student to the University community, with special emphasis on resources, responsibilities and ethics.

Social Connectedness in the Age of Technology

FY-101-SW02 C. Hogan
Day and Time: MW 4:30-5:45PM

Description:

This course will examine issues related to social intelligence. A central focus will be on how social intelligence is developed from childhood through adulthood and why it is important to understand and develop, as well as ethical concerns in working with people who have difficulty with developing social relationships. A central theme will be how to create the conditions in which encourage and support the growth of social intelligence. This course will also introduce the student to the University community, with special emphasis on resources, responsibilities and ethics.

Identity and Alienation in the Drama of Alan Ball

FY-101-TH01 S. Anderson
Day and Time: MTH 1:00-2:15PM

Description:

Seminar-style course addressing the themes of identity and alienation in the plays, films, and television series of writer Alan Ball. Ball’s characters frequently grapple with conformity and an idealized notion of the American Dream. Ball addresses (and debunks) stereotypes of familial relationships, gender, sexual orientation, and the status quo. By viewing and discussing Ball’s works, students should begin to evaluate their own notions of identity as they transition into their lives at Monmouth. This course fulfills the First Year Seminar General Education requirement.