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General Education

Previous Courses: Fall 2011

Fall 2011: First Year Seminar Available Courses

Course Title Course Number Professor

Great Excavations: The Archaeology of the Ancient World

FY-101-AN01 R. Veit
Day and Time: MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

The course is a first-year seminar that examines how archaeologists study and interpret the ancient world. Ancient societies from North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe are examined. Students are introduced to the ethical challenges that face archaeologists and to how archaeologists separate fact from fiction.

Playbooks and Checkbooks: An Introduction to the Economics of Sports

FY-101-BE01 P. O’Halloran
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course is an exploration of the history, economics and business of professional and amateur sports. Although this course mainly focuses on the economics of sports, we will trace the history and development of modern sports from the Olympics of ancient Greece to the multibillion dollar professional sports industry of today. Furthermore, we will investigate the organization of leagues and their market structures as well as government policy with regard to the regulation of sports. We will also explore the labor market for sports professionals and determine if players are worth the tremendous amounts many of them receive, evaluate labor-management relations, and the link between performance and pay. We will also consider many ethical issues in modern sports as well as potential future developments and explore the role of sports in the modern global economy. Lastly, we will explore the pivotal role played by modern media and the “professionalization” of collegiate sports.

The Global Commons: Energy and the Environment

FY-101-BM01 R. Nersesian
M. Protono
Day and Time: MTH 1:00-2:15PM

Description:

This course is an expansive exploration of the human environment and the technological, economic, political, and ethical challenges that confront the business sector as it seeks to extend the high-energy consuming Western lifestyle to every corner of the globe. How can business satisfy the energy consumption demands of the present without irreparably depleting the earth’s resources and leaving future generations in the lurch? Are renewable sources of energy a possibility or merely a pipe dream? Team taught by an energy expert and an ethicist, this course explores environmental sustainability in all of its aspects. The course perspective is that of responsible corporate managers and business leaders determined to uphold their individual and collective responsibilities to serve as stewards of the human environment while meeting the legitimate expectations of the economic and non-economic stakeholders who look to business to provide an ever-increasing array of life-enhancing goods and services.

The Global Commons: Energy and the Environment

FY-101-BM02 R. Nersesian
M. Protono
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

This course is an expansive exploration of the human environment and the technological, economic, political, and ethical challenges that confront the business sector as it seeks to extend the high-energy consuming Western lifestyle to every corner of the globe. How can business satisfy the energy consumption demands of the present without irreparably depleting the earth’s resources and leaving future generations in the lurch? Are renewable sources of energy a possibility or merely a pipe dream? Team taught by an energy expert and an ethicist, this course explores environmental sustainability in all of its aspects. The course perspective is that of responsible corporate managers and business leaders determined to uphold their individual and collective responsibilities to serve as stewards of the human environment while meeting the legitimate expectations of the economic and non-economic stakeholders who look to business to provide an ever-increasing array of life-enhancing goods and services.

How Rock and Roll Shaped America in the 1950s and 1960s

FY-101-BM03 S. Rosenberg
Day and Time: TF 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

This course introduces students to the impact of rock and roll music, from its beginnings in 1955 through the end of the 1960s. During this fifteen year period, popular music witnessed a new generation of singers, songwriters, musicians, and producers who innovated a variety of new musical genres, all of which fell under heading of rock and roll. Moreover, this period was one of tremendous political and social upheaval, and rock and roll not only mirrored the evolution of the socio-political environment but it also had a significant effect in shaping the popular culture of this turbulent and exciting time. From the emergence of Elvis Presley in the mid-1950s, to the teen idols of the late 1950s, to the British invasion and soul music in the mid-1960s, to the progressive rock of the late 1960s, all of the important developments in popular music are thoroughly reviewed in the context of this golden era of rock and roll.

Working with Attitudes: Teambuilding and Collaboration

FY-101-BM04 J. Mosca
A. Fazzari
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This course is designed to show us that we are truly DYNAMIC individuals, and that change and growth can be a positive part of collegiate life. You will be introduced to the benefits of working collaboratively in a group as a team. You will work on high-involvement activities and projects critical to increasing your self-awareness and interdependence. By working in a team you will: enhance your critical thinking and decision-making skills; broaden your base of information; learn the art of consensus building; heighten your communication and listening skills; conduct an ongoing effectiveness assessment; formulate and strengthen your values; create a cultural foundation; become accountable to others; set, agree upon, and attain goals; and manage your ethical and moral behavior for the good of the group.

From Our Classroom to Your Boardroom – Necessary Business Skills

FY-101-BM51 J. Buzza
C DeStafano
Day and Time: TH 6:00-8:45 PM

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine various approaches on how to use your knowledge and maximize its application to college life, the outside world and your future at Monmouth University. We will utilize a series of tasks that must be performed well to insure the success of any student in an entrepreneurial setting.

Encounters with Unseen Life

FY-101-BY01 K. Lionetti
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

Encounters with Unseen Life is a first year seminar course designed to introduce students to college life at Monmouth University and to the field of biology. Students will become familiar with resources provided by Monmouth University to help them with all aspects of their college life. They will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college as well as ethical issues pertaining to the field of biology. Students will learn about basic biology and microbiology through readings, discussions, assignments and laboratory demonstrations. Students will participate in various University functions as they learn to how to be successful in college. They will become familiar with the academic culture of biologists.

Underwear Goes Inside the Pants

FY-101-BY02 D. Rhoads
Day and Time: T 10:00-11:15AM
TH 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

This First Year Seminar takes its name and starting point for content from a 2004 song by the band Lazyboy. Through readings, presentations, essays, and discussion, students will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college as well as those for which the song Underwear Goes Inside the Pants is rich in content. Issues range from the illegality of some natural drugs to the ubiquitous “pushing” of prescription drugs in TV ads, and on to some of the most pervasive physical manifestations of societal ills, the obesity “epidemic” and homelessness, concluding with the callous rebuke of a homeless man, who happens to be wearing his underwear outside his pants, to “get a job.” Two of the issues, drug use and obesity, will be explored for their biological content, as will the additional topics of learning and stress. The course will help introduce important aspects of college life and university resources.

Global Aspects of Crime

FY-101-CJ01 A. Jamison
B. Sever
Day and Time: MW 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

This course takes a comparative look at varying legal cultures and their differing strategies taken to combat crime in the United States and nations abroad. This course also provides academic, personal, and career development for students, including an orientation to Monmouth University and its resources.

Global Aspects of Crime

FY-101-CJ02 A. Jamison
B. Sever
Day and Time: MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course takes a comparative look at varying legal cultures and their differing strategies taken to combat crime in the United States and nations abroad. This course also provides academic, personal, and career development for students, including an orientation to Monmouth University and its resources.

Mass Media and Popular Culture

FY-101-CO02 D. Dolphin
Day and Time: TH 10:00AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course addresses the ways in which mass media affects the creation of a popular culture in our society, and how that popular culture impacts the values of the society in return. This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience. Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engaging in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practicing their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem solving skills.

What’s So Funny? An Inquiry into the Nature and Function of Humor

FY-101-CO03 M. Phillips-Anderson
Day and Time: TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

E.B. White said “Humor can be dissected, as a frog can, but the thing dies in the process and the innards are discouraging to any but the pure scientific mind.” We will attempt to prove Mr. White incorrect. Humor may be the most human of activities, yet it is scarcely understood. This First Year Seminar will be a humanistic inquiry into the nature and functions of humor and laughter. We will explore philosophical, communicative, physiological, and cultural perspectives on humor and laughter. We will discuss issues related to the transition between high school and college and, with any luck, find some laughter in the process.

Bueller? … Bueller? … Bueller? John Hughes and Your First Year

FY-101-CO05 A. Furgason
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course will give students a deeper appreciation of how and why the medium of film influences modern man along with the technical elements of the craft of filmmaking … specifically in the films of John Hughes (The Breakfast Club, 16 Candles, Pretty in Pink). The class examines how Hughes’ childhood and cultural influences impacted his filmmaking. Students will become familiar with the major theories of the screen arts. An introductory understanding of semiotics will be achieved, which will allow students to read individual artifacts of the screen as text. Skills in critique and analysis will be emphasized. Students who successfully complete this course will have begun to develop a “critical eye” for the interpretation and analysis of the screen arts, as well as the language for critical discussion thereof.

Leadership: Art, Science, or Illusion

FY-101-CO06 D. Swanson
Day and Time: MTHF 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

Using the nature of leadership theory and practice as a focal point, this course will explore aspects of leadership with a particular emphasis on the nature of communication strategy and skill, historical perspectives, and contemporary research on various perspectives of leadership and followership. This seminar-style course addresses various topics that are of particular interest to first-year university students. The course also will address sharpening higher-level academic skills, enhancing awareness of ethical issues, and making a successful transition to university life.

Hollywood’s Journalism: The Image of Journalists and Journalism in Popular Culture

FY-101-CO07 M. Vujnovic
Day and Time: MW 4:30-5:45PM

Description:

This seminar-style course explores representations of journalism and journalists (public relations practitioners, publicists) in Hollywood movies. Selection of the movies ranges from the 1920s to the present taking into account various historical perspectives. This course also addresses sharpening higher-level academic skills, enhancing awareness of ethical issues, and making a successful transition to university life.

Deception and Communication in Our Lives: Personal, Social, and Mediated Deception

FY-101-CO08 R. Sanford
M. Hrycenko
Day and Time: TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course addresses the ways in which we conceive of, practice, tolerate, and detect deception in personal, social, and mediated formats. We will consider the forms of deceptive practices and the ethics of deceptive behaviors, as well as the outcomes and consequences of deception in various relational forms. This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources, and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience. Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engage in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practice their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem-solving skills.

Deception and Communication in Our Lives: Personal, Social, and Mediated Deception

FY-101-CO51 R. Sanford
J. Urgola
Day and Time: TTH 6:00-7:15PM

Description:

This course addresses the ways in which we conceive of, practice, tolerate, and detect deception in personal, social, and mediated formats. We will consider the forms of deceptive practices and the ethics of deceptive behaviors, as well as the outcomes and consequences of deception in various relational forms. This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources, and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience. Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engage in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practice their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem-solving skills.

Neverlands: Children’s Literature of the Golden Age

FY-101-EN02 L. Sacks
Day and Time: T 10:00-11:15AM
TH 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

This course asks you to engage in serious study of some of the most beloved texts written in English for children in the 19th and early 20th centuries, from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland to Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island and L. Frank Baum’s Wizard of Oz. Since the field of children’s literature is too vast for us to attempt to examine it in full, we will limit ourselves to the study of representative texts of English and American literature that scholars recognize today as “Golden Age” children’s literature.
Children’s literature is not just for children. In fact, some authors argue that children’s literature is mostly about how adults view childhood and what it means to be a “grown-up.” Therefore, we will first read this literature with the goal of understanding its diverse representations of children, childhood, and the homes or domestic spheres with which they are associated.
Then we will read this literature with the goals of understanding the ways in which it provides insights into children’s imaginations, interests, and fears; raises ethical questions that are relevant today; and continues to engage readers of all ages.

Neverlands: Children’s Literature of the Golden Age

FY-101-EN03 L. Sacks
Day and Time: TTH 4:30-5:45PM

Description:

This course asks you to engage in serious study of some of the most beloved texts written in English for children in the 19th and early 20th centuries, from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland to Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island and L. Frank Baum’s Wizard of Oz. Since the field of children’s literature is too vast for us to attempt to examine it in full, we will limit ourselves to the study of representative texts of English and American literature that scholars recognize today as “Golden Age” children’s literature.
Children’s literature is not just for children. In fact, some authors argue that children’s literature is mostly about how adults view childhood and what it means to be a “grown-up.” Therefore, we will first read this literature with the goal of understanding its diverse representations of children, childhood, and the homes or domestic spheres with which they are associated.
Then we will read this literature with the goals of understanding the ways in which it provides insights into children’s imaginations, interests, and fears; raises ethical questions that are relevant today; and continues to engage readers of all ages.

Introduction to Health Occupations

FY-101-HE01 L. Kelly
Day and Time: TF 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

Introduction to Health Occupations is a first year seminar course designed to introduce students to college life at Monmouth University and careers in the field of health. Students will become familiar with resources provided by Monmouth University to help them with all aspects of their college life. They will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college, as well as ethical issues pertaining to health occupations. Through classroom lecture, discussions, reading, and research, students will examine health care professions and professional organizations while investigating the educational and training requirements to become a health care professional. Students will also participate in various University functions as they learn to how to be successful in college.

Addiction in Popular Movies

FY-101-HE02 L. Jannone
Day and Time: MTH 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This First Year Seminar introduces students to the history of addiction as portrayed in popular movies. Movies will be watched that portray different types of addiction, starting with the Days of Wine and Roses made in 1962 and ending with <em (2000) . Some documentaries will also be examined. Students will write papers and discuss the various types of addictions seen in the various movies. Also, the personality of the addict will be explored in each movie. These movies will be used to help understand the theory of addiction. Legal and ethical concerns, as well as historical issues, are examined. Treatment modalities will be explored.

Animals: Life, Death, Kindness, and Sin

FY-101-HE03 C. Hirschler
Day and Time: TF 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

Animals: Life, Death, Kindness, and Sin will introduce students to the varied and complex ways in which animals contribute to human well-being and illness. Students will expand their understanding of the biological, social, psychological, environmental, occupational, spiritual, and cultural implications associated with the use of, and relationships with, animals. Students will critically examine cultural beliefs and practices that impact the well-being of humans, animals, and the planet. Students will be required to provide service for approximately 6 hours at the MCSPCA (located 2 miles from campus) as “cat socializers” or Thrift Store workers. Students must be available for training and service hours at the MCSPCA on 3 Saturdays in mid-September to early October. This service learning experience will engage students in the community, facilitate deep learning, and provide an opportunity to bond with non-human animals and classmates.

Tea Appreciation

FY-101-HE04 J. Konopack
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

Attention tea lovers! In this seminar, we will explore the history, art, and science of tea. You will drink dozens of teas throughout the semester as you take part in class discussions and activities that are designed to help you feel right at home at MU. Join us!

Culture War in Modern America: God, Country, and Family

FY-101-HS01 M. Dorment
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This course will examine the social issues and historical contexts which generated the emergence and crystallization of culture war in modern America. From the Scopes Trial to the current issue of gay marriage, it will explore how culture warriors, on a variety of different fronts, have battled to define America, to create, protect, and belatedly, to contest its beliefs, values, and traditions. In so doing, it will highlight the tension between tradition and modernity which has caused and continues to cause deep fissures in the American social fabric, ultimately affecting the nature of American democracy itself. As the culture wars are ongoing, the course will emphasize student engagement in current events and national ethical debates on issues pertaining to the course content.

Remembering Us: Children of the Holocaust

FY-101-HS02 S. Douglass
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

The Holocaust stands out in historical memory as a time when the ethical and moral fabric of society was torn apart as the Nazis spread extermination Anti-Semitism throughout Europe. Remembering Us: Children of the Holocaust will study this tragic era through the eyes of Jewish children who were caught up in Hitler’s agenda of genocide. A unique part of this course will be the oral history component enabling each student to interview an eye-witness to this era, a child survivor of the Holocaust.

History and Hollywood

FY-101-HS04 K. Parkin
Day and Time: T 1:00-2:15PM
TH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description:

This course explores the relationship between film and history in the United States. We will consider how filmmakers have presented people, places, and events in historic context and evaluate their effectiveness in communicating the essence of the period and the particulars of their subject. Major areas of analysis will include politics, war, gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and national identity. Working with monographs, scholarly articles, primary sources, and the movies themselves, we will explore the benefits and challenges of movie makers as historians and interrogate the role of movies in American history.

The Beatles

FY-101-HS06 K. Campbell
Day and Time: MW 4:30-5:45PM

Description:

This course explores the historical and cultural context for the rise of the Beatles and the impact that the group and its music had on the history of the 1960s and beyond. We will examine the ways in which the Beatles were shaped by and shaped their times, particularly considering the group in the context of post-war Britain and Europe, as well as the vast cultural changes that occurred in Britain and the United States during the 1960s. This course fulfills the First Year Seminar General Education requirement.

Culture War in Modern America: God, Country, and Family

FY-101-HS50 M. Dorment
Day and Time: TTH 6:00-7:15PM

Description:

This course will examine the social issues and historical contexts which generated the emergence and crystallization of culture war in modern America. From the Scopes Trial to the current issue of gay marriage, it will explore how culture warriors, on a variety of different fronts, have battled to define America, to create, protect, and belatedly, to contest its beliefs, values, and traditions. In so doing, it will highlight the tension between tradition and modernity which has caused and continues to cause deep fissures in the American social fabric, ultimately affecting the nature of American democracy itself. As the culture wars are ongoing, the course will emphasize student engagement in current events and national ethical debates on issues pertaining to the course content.

Numbers, Clocks, and Secret Codes

FY-101-MA01 D. Marshall
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This First Year Seminar will study the applications of mathematics to various types of codes, including identification numbers, check digit schemes, and selected methods of cryptography. Modular, or “clock,” arithmetic will be developed to greatly increase the number of meaningful examples that can be covered. The impact of cryptography on history and society will also be explored. Students will be instructed on the academic expectations of college, and on how to best achieve these expectations. Additional aspects of college life will be the subject of readings and discussions.

South Park and Philosophy

FY-101-PL01 S. Dalton
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This class will be an introduction to philosophy using episodes of the TV show South Park as case studies in conjunction with philosophy readings. Through the readings and the South Park case studies, we will explore some of the most important questions that have been debated by philosophers ever since the time of Socrates. These questions are relevant to every discipline that you may choose as a major, and they are relevant to every career that awaits you in the future. So the study of philosophy that you do in this class will make you a more thoughtful and capable college student, and it will also prepare you for a more fulfilling life after you graduate.

An Unexamined Life is Not Worth Living

FY-101-PL50 P. Simonelli
Day and Time: MW 6:00-7:15PM

Description:

The Philosophy, Religion, and Interdisciplinary Studies First Year Seminar recognizes the importance of stimulating students’ learning curiosity and giving them a foundation for transition to university life. This course will engage our students: a) with an understanding of Philosophy, Religion, and Interdisciplinary Studies, as a way of life and expression; b) with a variety of topics; and c) by addressing issues related to first-year students: Academic, Ethics, and Transition. Philosophy is the source from which all other disciplines spring. It gives the skills to be successful through critical thinking. It allows students to make sense of their world and enhances proficiency for future careers such as politics, law, banking, business, medicine, science, and others. The philosophical emphasis on such questions as, “Who am I?” “Where do I come from?” “What should I do?” “Where am I going?” etc., train us to live an overall richer, fuller, and more rewarding life.

South Park and Philosophy

FY-101-PL51 S. Dalton
Day and Time: MW 6:00-7:15PM

Description:

This class will be an introduction to philosophy using episodes of the TV show South Park as case studies in conjunction with philosophy readings. Through the readings and the South Park case studies, we will explore some of the most important questions that have been debated by philosophers ever since the time of Socrates. These questions are relevant to every discipline that you may choose as a major, and they are relevant to every career that awaits you in the future. So the study of philosophy that you do in this class will make you a more thoughtful and capable college student, and it will also prepare you for a more fulfilling life after you graduate.

I Fought the Law and I Won: Debating Legal Rights in the 21st Century

FY-101-PS01 G. Bordelon
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

Aristotle’s Politics argues that political debate is the most highly valued political skill because it is through debate that we are able to carry reason into action. Debate is the public vehicle by which we make decisions that impact all members of society. Debates echo in the halls of Congress, in trial courts across the land, and in executive offices, because it is through the art of debate that we are able to test the veracity of what we believe to be true. Some even believe it is better to debate questions without settling them than it is to settle questions without debating them. This first-year seminar course blends an emphasis on legal principles associated with American Civil Liberties with the art of Policy Debate in an attempt to help build honest and competent leaders at Monmouth University.

I Fought the Law and I Won: Debating Legal Rights in the 21st Century

FY-101-PS02 G. Bordelon
Day and Time: TF 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

Aristotle’s Politics argues that political debate is the most highly valued political skill because it is through debate that we are able to carry reason into action. Debate is the public vehicle by which we make decisions that impact all members of society. Debates echo in the halls of Congress, in trial courts across the land, and in executive offices, because it is through the art of debate that we are able to test the veracity of what we believe to be true. Some even believe it is better to debate questions without settling them than it is to settle questions without debating them. This first-year seminar course blends an emphasis on legal principles associated with American Civil Liberties with the art of Policy Debate in an attempt to help build honest and competent leaders at Monmouth University.

Health Psychology

FY-101-PY01 M. Van Volkom
Day and Time: MTH 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

This course will focus on the aspects of health psychology that are most relevant to a first year college student. These aspects include avoiding dependence on alcohol and tobacco, making good choices when it comes to nutrition and exercise, managing stress, maintaining healthy relationships, and taking steps toward good financial health during this important transitional period in a young adult’s life. In addition, this course will utilize various activities and assignments that are designed to help students with the transition to college in general, and to Monmouth University specifically. Transition topics include study skills, avoidance of plagiarism, and using the University library.

Resistance is Futile? Social Influence in Everyday Life

FY-101-PY02 J. Nye
Day and Time: TF 2:30-3:45PM

Description:

We live in a society that celebrates the individual; our cultural heroes are made up of revolutionaries, nonconformists, and trouble makers. At the same time, each of us feels incredible pressure to conform to the expectations and values of our society. How do we live under the pressure of these two competing forces? Somehow we manage. This course will focus on how humans walk this fine line every day, bending to the will of social forces at times and resisting them at others— sometimes contributing to these forces, ourselves. Course readings and activities will focus on what social scientists have learned about the powerful social forces that shape humans in both positive and negative directions. These social forces will also be examined in terms of how they affect the lives of college students. In particular, we will note the academic, social, personal, and professional transformation that occurs in you as you integrate yourself into the Monmouth University community.

The Psychology of Gender

FY-101-PY03 J. Stapley
Day and Time: TTH 4:30-5:45PM

Description:

Students will be introduced to the study of gender through the discipline of psychology. The course will include analysis of film, print media, and direct observational study of people, as well as readings regarding the socialization of gender roles, the effect of gender roles on behavior, and the development of students’ identity and career aspirations. The course will also address sharpening higher-level academic skills, enhancing awareness of ethical issues, and making a successful transition to university life.

Creating Software Animations

FY-101-SE01 A. Milewski
Day and Time: MTH 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This course provides a broad overview of the Computer Science and Software Engineering disciplines, and prepares students for technology and software-oriented courses that they may take by teaching them how to develop software animations that are closely related to gaming and motion picture animation. Topics covered include: programming concepts and object-oriented design; animation programming; computer architecture; programming languages; compilers; operating systems; and problem solving in the context of software. The course will also sharpen higher-level academic skills, enhance awareness of professionalism and ethical issues, and facilitate a successful transition to university life.

Beyond Timbuktu: A Journey through West Africa

FY-101-SO01 N. Mezey
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

Come take an intellectual and malaria-free journey to West Africa. In this course we will be weaving together academics, ethics, and a transition to college by focusing on the historical, cultural, economic, and political landscape of both West Africa and Monmouth University. Drawing on university resources, academic texts, and the professor’s personal experiences of living in Mali as a Peace Corps Volunteer, students will learn about how and why the region of West Africa is economically poor, politically in transition, and culturally rich. Students will also learn about the rich resources offered through Monmouth University’s comprehensive academic, social, and professional opportunities.

Social Connectedness in the Age of Technology

FY-101-SW01 K. Dell
Day and Time: WF 10:00-11:15AM

Description:

This course will examine issues related to social intelligence. A central focus will be on how social intelligence is developed from childhood through adulthood and why it is important to understand and develop, as well as ethical concerns in working with people who have difficulty with developing social relationships. A central theme will be how to create the conditions that encourage and support the growth of social intelligence. This course will also introduce the student to the University community, with special emphasis on resources, responsibilities, and ethics.

Experiences of Childhood and Adolescence

FY-101-SW02 K. Ward
Day and Time: T 10:00-11:15AM
TH 8:30-9:45AM

Description:

This course will examine issues related to childhood and adolescence. A central focus will be on how children and adolescents confront the issues that face them, as well as ethical concerns in working with children and adolescents. A central theme will be how to create the conditions in which children and youth can increase resilience. This course will also introduce the student to the University community, with special emphasis on resources, responsibilities, and ethics.

Identity and Alienation in the Drama of Alan Ball

FY-101-TH01 S. Anderson
Day and Time: MTH 1:00-2:15PM

Description:

This seminar-style course addresses the themes of identity and alienation in the plays, films, and television series of writer Alan Ball. Ball’s characters frequently grapple with conformity and an idealized notion of the American Dream. Ball addresses (and debunks) stereotypes of familial relationships, gender, sexual orientation, and the status quo. By viewing and discussing Ball’s works, students should begin to evaluate their own notions of identity as they transition into their lives at Monmouth. This course fulfills the First Year Seminar General Education requirement.