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General Education

Current Course Offerings


Course Listing for Fall 2019

Please click on a course title below for additional information.

Click button to view First Year Seminar courses by area of interest

 

COURSE UPDATES  Recent Changes

Please click here for recent changes to our First Semester courses.

 
Recent Course Changes:
Please note that the following changes have taken place with our First Year Seminar courses ... they may be different since you last checked.

  1. July 10th: FYEN 107 01 Humans and the Environment is no longer clustered and no longer team taught.  Students may register for this course on its own. Recommended for English, Health Studies, Psychology, and Business majors.
  2. New course added: FYCJ 103 01 Media and Criminal Justice: The CSI Effect
  3. Course removed: FYAR 103 01 & 02 Street Art
  4. Additional information for FYCS 102 01 The Diversity Divide: Technology - “If you like gaming, are planning on working in business, management or human resources, are into social issues and communication, or are a curious individual - think about choosing The Diversity Divide: Technology as your First Year Seminar. We’ll look at how Fortnite tried to address diversity and fell short, how some gamers choose toxicity instead of diversity and lose financially, and how diversity in the business world improves financial revenues and meaningful engagement with clients and employees.”

 

FYAN 102 01  Love in Comparative Perspective

Schedule: WED/FRI 1:15-2:35 Professor(s): B. Nappi

Course Description:
In the West, we often categorize love into various types (e.g. “erotic”, “sibling”, “parent-child”, “divine”). What exactly are the differences among these types of love? How have our ideas about love changed over the centuries? How does the human capacity for love change throughout the individual lifecycle? How much variation exists among the cultures of the world with respect to the experience of love? This First Year seminar course explores these questions through scholarly readings drawn from philosophy, anthropology, psychoanalysis and critical theory, as well as through fictional materials (films, poems, short stories, etc).

Learn about Professor Nappi

FYAN 103 01  Great Excavations: The Archaeology of the Ancient World

Schedule: MON/WED 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): R. Veit

Course Description:
The course is a first-year seminar that examines how archaeologists study and interpret the ancient world. Ancient societies from North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe are examined. Students are introduced to the ethical challenges that face archaeologists and to how archaeologists separate fact from fiction. Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will be used to pay for transportation to either the University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia or the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Additional in-class projects may also be supported by this fee.

Learn about Professor Veit  -  Faces of Monmouth - Richard Veit

FYBE 103 01  Personal Finance

Schedule: MON/THUR 1:15-2:35 Professor(s): P. Christakos

Course Description:
In this course you will learn about the history of money, credit, and finance. You will gain an understanding of how the modern financial system is structured. Most importantly, you will learn how to manage your own finances.

Learn about Professor Christakos

FYBM 103 01  From Our Classroom to Your Boardroom - Necessary Business Skills Now and Forever

Schedule: TUES 10:05-11:25 THUR 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): J. Buzza

Course Description:
The purpose of this course is to examine various approaches on how to use your knowledge and maximize its application to college life, the outside world and your future at Monmouth University. We will utilize a series of tasks that must be performed well to insure the success of any student in an entrepreneurial setting.

Learn about Professor Buzza and Applying the Principles of Entrepreneurship

FYBM 103 02  From Our Classroom to Your Boardroom - Necessary Business Skills Now and Forever

Schedule: TUES/FRI 2:50-4:20 Professor(s): J. Buzza/C. DeStefano

Course Description:
The purpose of this course is to examine various approaches on how to use your knowledge and maximize its application to college life, the outside world and your future at Monmouth University. We will utilize a series of tasks that must be performed well to insure the success of any student in an entrepreneurial setting.

Learn about Professor Buzza and Applying the Principles of Entrepreneurship

 

FYBY 104 01  Dinosaurs and DNA: Biology in the Movies

Schedule: WED/FRI 1:15-2:35 Professor(s): D. Lobo

Course Description:
Dinosaurs and DNA: Biology in the Movies is designed to introduce students to college life at Monmouth University and to the field of biology. Students will become familiar with resources provided by Monmouth University to help them with all aspects of their college life. They will explore ethical issues dealing with experiences likely to be encountered in college as well as ethical issues pertaining to the field of biology. Students will learn about basic aspects of genetics (inheritance), cloning, and genetic engineering through readings, discussions, and assignments related to popular movies (GATTACA, Jurassic Park). Students will participate in various University functions as they learn how to be successful in college. They will become familiar with the academic culture of biologists.

Learn about Professor Lobo

FYCE 103 01  Sustainable Energy

Schedule: TUES 1:15-2:35 THURS 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): G. Moehring

Course Description:
Industry and transportation are two keys aspects of society that have been profoundly impacted by abundant low cost energy. What does the future of energy look like in terms of abundance and cost? This course examines energy sources, energy needs, and the transition from geologically stored energy sources (fossil fuels) to ecologically available energy sources and conservation.

Learn about Professor Moehring

FYCJ 103 01  Media and Criminal Justice: The CSI Effect

Schedule: TUES/FRI 2:50 -4:10 Professor(s): N. Sewitch/C. York

Course Description:
This course examines the relationship between and the effects of the popular media-motion pictures, popular television dramas and news reports-crime, and the criminal justice system. In addition, this course assists students in developing academic, personal and career development for students, including an orientation to Monmouth University and its resources.

This course will be team-taught by two professors:

Learn about Professor Sewitch and Professor York

 

FYCJ 104 01  Victims of Crime

Schedule: MON/WED 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): S. Cunningham

Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to the study of victims of crime. In this course, students will gain an understanding of: 1) the factors that increase and decrease the risk of criminal victimization, 2) the individual and collective impacts of criminal victimization, 3) the criminal justice professionals who respond and provide services to crime victims, and the role crime victims play in the criminal justice process. Course readings will encourage students to engage in discussions on the legal, social, practical and ethical considerations of criminal victimization in the United States. In addition, this course assists students in developing academic, personal, and career skills, including an orientation to Monmouth University and its resources.

Learn about Professor Cunningham

FYCO 102 01  Mass Media and Popular Culture

Schedule: WED 10:05-1:00 Professor(s): D. Dolphin

Course Description:
This course addresses the ways in which mass media affects the creation of a popular culture in our society, and how that popular culture impacts the values of the society in return.   This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience.  Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engaging in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practicing their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem solving skills.

Learn about Professor Dolphin

 

FYCO 107 01  Communication in Relationships: Personal, Social and Professional Relationships

Schedule: MON/THUR 2:50-4:10 Professor(s): S. Hokanson

Course Description:
This course addresses the development, maintenance, and termination of personal, social, and professional relationships in our lives. This course will provide an opportunity to sharpen students’ higher-level academic skills, enhance their awareness of ethical issues in academia in general and the course topic in particular, and introduce them to the benefits of integrating university resources and extracurricular activities and events on campus to enrich their overall academic experience. Through the lenses of topics designed to be particularly relevant to first-year university students, students will gain experience in researching scholarly references, engaging in critical analysis of information from a variety of sources, and practicing their logical argumentation, oral discourse, and collaborative problem solving skills.

Learn about Professor Hokanson

FYCO 110 01  Food, Communication, Culture, and Performance

Schedule: TUES 10:05-11:25 THUR 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): D. Shoemaker

Course Description:
The purpose of this seminar-style course is to explore topics of particular interest to first-year university students. We will explore how we use food to communicate personal identity, relationships, cultures, and politics. We will also examine the intersections of food, communication, ethics, and health issues across texts and practices: through published stories, advertising, cooking shows, and cookbooks; through interactions including conversations, demonstrations, and performances; and through preparing, sharing, and eating food.

Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will go towards either a field trip to a local farm/farmer's market, to a cooking class off campus, to see a movie related to our course topic, or to purchase food items for a special class potluck. In some cases, part of the fee may pay for transportation via bus or train to an off-campus location.

Learn about Professor Shoemaker

FYCO 111 01  Bueller?...Bueller?...Bueller?: John Hughes and Your First Year

Schedule: TUES 1:15-2:35 THUR 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): R. Scott

Course Description:
To give students a deeper appreciation of how and why the medium of film influences modern man along with the technical elements of the craft of filmmaking, specifically in the films of John Hughes. The class examines how Hughes childhood and cultural influences impacted his filmmaking. Students will become familiar with the major theories of the screen arts. An introductory understanding of semiotics will be achieved, which will allow the student to read individual artifacts of the screen as text. Skills in critique and analysis will be emphasized. The student who successfully completes this course will have begun to develop a 'critical eye' for the interpretation and analysis of the screen arts, as well as the language for critical discussion thereof.

Learn more about Professor Scott

FYCO 112 01  Talk About, Pop Music! Pop Music & Your First Year

Schedule: MON/THUR 1:15-2:35 Professor(s): A. Furgason

Course Description:
This class offers a historical examination of pop music from its inception in the 1960s to placate the viewed threat of Rock ‘n’ Roll music on youth through the pop music stars of today. Of particular interest is an emphasis on the production of pop music, the difference in pop genres and an examination of the themes found in pop music lyrics and videos. The class will examine what similarities and differences exist between the early pop music of Bobby Darin and Fabian, to the European influence on pop music from Abba and the Bay City Rollers, to the rise of New-Wave music and Teen Pop bands pop in the 1980s that led to the explosion of pop singers Britney Spears and Christina Aquilera and teen pop bands The Backstreet Boys and N’Sync in the early 1990s. The current state of pop music from stars like Bruno Mars, Miley Cyrus, and Lady Gaga will also be discussed. The class will cover areas that include the production of hooks, lyrical decisions, and the importance of music producers and engineers to the production of pop music. The impact of pop music on global, social, political, health, and cultural issues will be discussed extensively. In addition, the relationship between commercial radio, pop music and the music industry will be considered. The class also features hands-on application via student-led radio shows presenting different eras of pop music on Monmouth University’s radio station, 88.9FM WMCX.

Learn more about Professor Furgason

FYCO 113 50  Diversity and Life Through the World of Baseball and Film

Schedule: TUES 6:05-9:00 Professor(s): M. Harmon

Course Description:
James Earl Jones playing the character of Terence Mann in the film Field of Dreams says, “The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: it’s a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us of all that once was good and it could be again.”  Sports has been and continues to be a great teaching element for people from many walks of life involving issues that include; gender & racial issues, proper planning of finances, family life, friendships, working together, and having a dream. This class will also incorporate ways to sharpen your academic skills, enhance awareness of ethical issues that exist during college life, and help you make a successful transition to university life here at MU.

Learn more about Professor HarmonMonmouth University's New Jersey Sportscaster of the Year in 2012 and 2014

FYCO 198 01  Cultures of Consumption: Communication, Identity, and Practices of Consumption

Schedule: MON/THUR 2:50-4:10 Professor(s): C. Taylor

Course Description:
This course will look at thought-provoking questions about popular culture and consumption: What do material things in my life mean to me? What do the objects I buy, the TV I watch, the music I listen to, and the social media I interact with, say about me? How does the stuff in my life shape who I am? To what extent should anyone care about “stuff” anyway? Students will learn to identify, define, analyze, and critique a broad range of images, symbols, material objects, cultural artifacts, and social practices that often work to produce the taken-for-granted meanings that seem to structure our everyday lives.

FYCS 102 01  The Diversity Divide: Technology

Schedule: TUES 10:05-11:25 THUR 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): J. Kretsch

Course Description:
The Diversity Divide: Technology course is designed to explore the timely and newsworthy issues related to lack of diversity in the computing and technology fields, while supporting a smooth and eye-opening transition to university life for first year students. We will explore the diversity issue from many directions, for example: Are there ethical issues at play when only those who fit a specific model are encouraged to pursue or succeed in computing and engineering? What factors may have led to a gender imbalance in the technology field? Do exclusionary practices have sociological implications? What kind of actions (local, national, worldwide) can assist in reversing the lack of diversity? Along the way, we will learn how to program and utilize some engaging and helpful technology tools.

Learn about Professor Kretsch

Click image to read and download flyer

FYCS 102 02  The Diversity Divide: Technology

Schedule: TUES 1:15-2:35 THUR 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): J. Kretsch

Course Description:
The Diversity Divide: Technology course is designed to explore the timely and newsworthy issues related to lack of diversity in the computing and technology fields, while supporting a smooth and eye-opening transition to university life for first year students. We will explore the diversity issue from many directions, for example: Are there ethical issues at play when only those who fit a specific model are encouraged to pursue or succeed in computing and engineering? What factors may have led to a gender imbalance in the technology field? Do exclusionary practices have sociological implications? What kind of actions (local, national, worldwide) can assist in reversing the lack of diversity? Along the way, we will learn how to program and utilize some engaging and helpful technology tools.

Learn about Professor Kretsch

Click image to read and download flyer

FYED 102 01  Latinx Culture and Communities in Schools

Schedule: TUES/FRI 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): A. Estudillo

Course Description:
The field of education is changing rapidly and US classrooms are becoming increasingly diverse. This course will focus on the Latina/o student, who is becoming more prevalent as our population changes. You'll obtain a holistic overview of the issues these students face as they move through our educational system. From the lives of the undocumented to the transition to college, this course provides you the opportunity to explore the ethical and critical concerns of Latinas/os in education.

Learn about Professor Estudillo

Click on image to view and download flyer

Click image to read and download flyer

FYEDL 103 01  Gaining Awareness: Racial Bias in the Media

Schedule: MON/WED 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): T. Paone

Course Description:
This course will allow students to see and critique racial bias in the media. The course will stress all races and will allow students to gain an understanding of the dominant cultural beliefs that exist in the United States and how those are portrayed in the media. It will also encompass the way the Whites and People of Color are portrayed and viewed in the media.

Learn about Professor Paone

FYEDL 104 01  Lead or Step Aside

Schedule: TUES 10:05-11:25 THUR 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): W. Greason

Course Description:
There has been a great deal written about leadership. But how do we know who is and who is not a leader? What are the characteristics that distinguish a leader? Who have been the major leaders of all time? These questions are important for each of us to reflect on. Therefore the focus of this course is to explore the concepts of leadership with a special emphasis on ethical leadership.

Learn more about Professor Greason

 

FYEDL 104 02  Lead or Step Aside

Schedule: WED/FRI 1:15-2:35 Professor(s): W. Greason

Course Description:
There has been a great deal written about leadership. But how do we know who is and who is not a leader? What are the characteristics that distinguish a leader? Who have been the major leaders of all time? These questions are important for each of us to reflect on. Therefore the focus of this course is to explore the concepts of leadership with a special emphasis on ethical leadership.

Learn more about Professor Greason

FYEDS 102 01  Who's in Your Selfie?

Schedule: TUES 10:05-11:25 THUR 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): R. Morris/M. Brennan

Course Description:
Society shapes many perceptions we form about ourselves. Social media is the platform that influences self-perceptions. We take selfies, post, and then wait for responses. Developing self-efficacy gives a college student ability to believe they can set and accomplish life goals that are not dependent on societal spectators clicking “like”, but guides them to make decisions about behavior with an ethical understanding. This seminar-style course addresses transitioning perceptions from the societal influences formed in high school and focuses intentionally on examining self-perception as a college student. This course provides students an opportunity to examine personal perceptions in light of ethical decisions made on the campus and in a service-learning partnership. Students learn about self-efficacy on the university campus through lectures, guest speakers, hands-on class participation, and a service-learning partnership. The service-learning partnership gives students the opportunity to try on self-efficacious attitudes by learning and collaborating as literacy mentors with at-risk elementary readers at the Amerigo A. Anastasia Elementary School in Long Branch, New Jersey. Self-efficacy is supported with opportunities to engage ethical behaviors through commitments, communicating, and contributing responsibly to others. The course uses the development of higher-level academic skills as foundational for transitioning to campus, extending learning into the community, and transitioning to life after college. Students complete the course with a selfie that depicts self-efficacy.

Learn about Professor Morris

Learn about Professor Brennan

FYEN 103 01  The Working World: College and Transition

Schedule: MON/THUR 10:05-11:25 Professor(s): J. Mantle

Course Description:
This course will examine and analyze our perceptions of the working world: what does “work” actually mean? How can we make our eventual work successful? How can we make our employment part of an overall goal for life satisfaction? We will also examine the pre-existing assumptions about work, employment, and college. Does college “only” prepare one for the working world? If not, what other purposes does it serve? What might certain literary works tell us about American assumptions about work, class, labor, and college life? In recent history, we have seen the fallout of troubling issues surrounding Wall Street and corporate practices. How can we understand the ethics around these issues? What impact do these practices have on ordinary Americans? We will entertain these questions, as well as examine more pragmatic considerations, such as study skills, time management skills, stress management skills, and life skills. Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will be used to pay for transportation and resources to support a collaborative project with a local high school.

Learn about Professor Mantle

FYEN 104 01  The Story of the Book

Schedule: MON/THUR 2:50-4:10 Professor(s): G. Germek

Course Description:
Books are the building blocks of civilization, and one of the world's greatest inventions. This course will introduce you to ancient written materials from clay tablets and Medieval manuscripts to modern novels, graphic novels, comic books, artists books, Harlequin romances, and much more. You'll get a rare opportunity to not just touch but work closely with rare works in our Library's Special Collections Room-which houses materials made of animal skin and ancient paper as well as beautiful manuscript leaves adorned with real gold and lapis lazuli. The course highlight is a wonderful trip to the Morgan Library in NYC, where you will be offered a special opportunity to experience a private, behind-the-scenes tour of one of the finest medieval manuscripts collections anywhere.

Please click image to read and download the flyer for this course titled The Story of the Book

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FYEN 106 01  The Detective Story: It's Elementary

Schedule: TUES 10:05-11:25 THUR 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): L. Siracusa

Course Description:
Do you love mysteries? The detective story is the bestselling form of narrative in the world, from classic literature to popular culture in TV shows, film, and even video games. In this course, through the use of lecture, discussion, small group activities, reading, in-class and out-of-class writing, and the use of video material, we will enjoy classic and contemporary short fiction featuring the amateur detective, the professional private investigator, and the police. What is behind our obsession with solving mysteries? What can the study of this genre teach us about society and ourselves? What can it teach us about our own intellectual work as students and scholars? Join us to find out!

Learn about Professor Siracusa

FYEN 107 01  Humans and the Environment

Schedule: MON/WED 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): H. Estes

Course Description:
This course introduces contemporary environmental issues from the perspectives of ethics and literary study, using writing and photography as ways to articulate observations and ideas about the environment.  Students think about ethical issues involved in human relationships with animals and the land, take on an environmentally focused project for the semester, and think about how that project interacts with course materials. The course will provide readings on and an opportunity to discuss some key questions about humans and our interactions with the environment: What are some of the relationships between humans and the natural world? How do we define “nature,” and to what extent are humans part of it? What contributions can humanistic study make to identifying, articulating and solving environmental problems? How do gender, race, and (dis)ability inflect human ideas about and relationships with the environment? How do different genres of texts and images convey ideas and evoke emotions?

Lab Fee: The laboratory fee for this course will be used to pay for transportation for a class trip. Additional class-related projects may also be supported by this fee.

Learn about Professor Estes

Professor Heide Estes’ Book Receives Positive Reviews

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FYHE 103 01  Anthrozoology, Ethics, and Health

Schedule: MON/WED 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): C. Hirschler

Course Description:
"Anthrozoology, Ethics, and Health" will introduce students to the varied and complex ways in which animals contribute to human well-being and illness. Students will expand their understanding of the biological, social, psychological, environmental, occupational, spiritual, and cultural implications associated with the use of, and relationships with, animals. Students will critically examine cultural beliefs and practices that impact the well-being of humans, animals, and the planet. Students will be required to provide service for approximately 6 hours at the MCSPCA (located 2 miles from campus) as "cat socializers" or Thrft Store workers. Students must be available for training and service hours at the MCSPCA on 3 Saturdays in mid-September to early October. This service learning experience will engage students in the community, facilitate deep learning, and provide an opportunity to bond with non-human animals and classmates. Lab Fee: The lab fee for this course will cover the cost associated with a required background check mandated by the Monmouth County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (MCSPCA) for all volunteer applicants.

Learn about Professor Hirschler - Faces of Monmouth - Chris Hirschler

 

FYHE 104 01  Introduction to Health Occupations

Schedule: WED/FRI 10:05-11:25 Professor(s): J. Schaaff

Course Description:
This course will introduce students to careers in the field of health, with an emphasis on stress management for both the practitioner and the patient. Through classroom lecture, discussions, readings, and research, students will examine various health care professions, education and training requirements, as well as various ethical issues. Students will also be introduced to college life at Monmouth University and participate in various campus events as they learn how to be successful in college.

Learn about Professor Schaaff

FYHE 104 02  Introduction to Health Occupations

Schedule: TUES/FRI 2:50 - 4:10 Professor(s): A. Hope

Course Description:
This course will introduce students to careers in the field of health, with an emphasis on stress management for both the practitioner and the patient. Through classroom lecture, discussions, readings, and research, students will examine various health care professions, education and training requirements, as well as various ethical issues. Students will also be introduced to college life at Monmouth University and participate in various campus events as they learn how to be successful in college.

Learn about Professor Hope

FYHS 102 01  The Beatles

Schedule: MON/WED 4:30-5:50 Professor(s): K. Campbell

Course Description:
This course explores the historical and cultural context for the rise of the Beatles and the impact that the group and its music had on the history of the 1960s and beyond. We will examine the ways in which the Beatles were shaped by and shaped their times, particularly considering the group in the context of post-war Britain and Europe and the vast cultural changes that occurred in Britain and the United States during the 1960s.

Learn about Professor Campbell

 

FYHS 106 01  History and Hollywood

Schedule: TUES/FRI 8:30-9:50 Professor(s): M. Ziobro

Course Description:
This course explores the relationship between film and history in the United States. We will consider how filmmakers have presented people, places, and events in historic context and evaluate their effectiveness in communicating the essence of the period and the particulars of their subject. Major areas of analysis will include politics, war, gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and national identity. Working with monographs, scholarly articles, primary sources, and the movies themselves we will explore the benefits and challenges of movie makers as historians and interrogate the role of movies in American history.

Learn about Professor Ziobro and some of her projects:

Bruce Springsteen:  'His Hometown' exhibit to explore Boss' roots in Freehold

Springsteen 'Hometown' exhibit to debut at Monmouth County Historical Association

 

FYHS 106 H1  History and Hollywood

Schedule: WED/FRI 10:05-11:25 Professor(s): M. Ziobro

Course Description:
This course explores the relationship between film and history in the United States. We will consider how filmmakers have presented people, places, and events in historic context and evaluate their effectiveness in communicating the essence of the period and the particulars of their subject. Major areas of analysis will include politics, war, gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and national identity. Working with monographs, scholarly articles, primary sources, and the movies themselves we will explore the benefits and challenges of movie makers as historians and interrogate the role of movies in American history.  STUDENTS MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR EN101 H1 - see Projected Realities for more information.

Learn about Professor Ziobro and some of her projects:

Bruce Springsteen:  'His Hometown' exhibit to explore Boss' roots in Freehold

Springsteen 'Hometown' exhibit to debut at Monmouth County Historical Association

 

FYHS 111 01  A Journey to St. Petersburg, Russia: A City of Transformation

Schedule: MON/THUR 2:50-4:10 Professor(s): T. Pearson

Course Description:
This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to one of the great cities of the world—St. Petersburg, Russia. It will explore its transformations and changing identities since its founding in 1703 by Peter the Great and its legacy of human endurance and cultural brilliance. Through their engagement with the history, literature, architecture, art, music and film of St. Petersburg, students will understand the unusual spatial and environmental character of the city and the five stages of its historical development, each with its own identity: Peter the Great’s “window on the West” in the eighteenth century; the administrative and cultural epicenter of the Russian empire in the nineteenth century; the birthplace and citadel of the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917; the “Hero City” Leningrad that survived the Nazi siege and blockade of World War II (the Great Patriotic War to Russians); and the “second city” and leading business development zone in post-Soviet Russia.

Learn about Professor Pearson

Please click image to read and download the flyer for this course titled A Journey to St. Petersburg, Russia: A City of Transformation

Click image to read and download flyer

 

FYMA 103 01  To Infinity and Beyond

Schedule: TUES 1:15-2:35 THUR 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): E. Palsu-Andrescu

Course Description:
The concept of infinity plays a central role in many aspects of modern thought, from the simple act of counting to the fundamental definitions underlying Calculus, from the pages of Euclid to the modern development of fractal geometry, and from the philosophical to the cosmological. Yet most of us have difficulty discussing the infinite with confidence and precision. Topics covered will be among the many occurrences of infinity in arithmetic, algebra, and geometry, as well as some of the surrounding philosophical issues that the concept of infinity brings to mathematics, theology, and physics.  Use the image link below for more information.

Learn about Professor Palsu-Andriescu

Please click image to read and download the flyer for this course titled To Infinity and Beyond

Click image to read and download flyer

 

 

 

FYNU 102 01  Addiction in Popular Movies

Schedule: MON/THUR 1:15-2:35 Professor(s): L. Jannone

Course Description:
This First Year Seminar introduces students to the history of addiction as portrayed in popular movies. Movies will be watched that portray different types of addiction starting with the Days of Wine and Roses made in 1962 and ending with Requiem for a Dream (2000) . Some documentaries will also be examined. Students will write papers and discuss the various types of addictions seen in the various movies. Also the personality of the addict will be explored in each movie. These movies will be used to help understand the theory of addiction. Legal and ethical concerns, as well as historical issues are examined. Treatment modalities will be explored.

Learn about Professor Jannone

FYPL 102 01  Science Fiction and Philosophy

Schedule: MON/WED 4:30-5:50 Professor(s): M. Chavez

Course Description:
In this class we will use science fiction to consider philosophical questions that are especially important for you as a first year college student. In addition to these theoretical issues, we will also devote considerable attention to strictly practical matters such as how to use the University Library for research, how to use the gym for sports and exercise, how to manage your time so that you can accomplish everything you want to accomplish, how to get involved in student groups and community service, and where to find the many offices that exist on campus to help students.

Learn about Professor Chavez

FYPS 102 01  Profiles in Courage: Youth, Citizenship, and Public Policy

Schedule: TUES 1:15-2:35 THUR 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): S. Chapman

Course Description:
Since the days when Socrates was accused of corrupting the youth, to President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration speech calling for public service, the role of the youth as citizens has been an important aspect of public life. Engaging citizens in debates about public policy issues is an effective way to raise awareness about political issues. The purpose of this course is to highlight the importance of awareness of public policy issues and their ethical underpinnings as fundamental to political participation by citizens in a democracy.

Learn about Professor Chapman

FYPS 103 01  Debating Globalization

Schedule: MON/THUR 1:15-2:35 Professor(s): K. Dooley

Course Description:
Globalization and its political and economic dimensions are the focus of this first year seminar. Four thematic sections represent the core of the course – (1) International Political Economy, (2) Security, (3) Environment and Public Health, and (4) Democracy, Demography and Social Issues. Engaging students in debates about globalization is an effective way to raise awareness of the challenges and opportunities that their generation will face. The purpose of this course is to highlight how globalization processes (economic and political) raise important ethical issues for different peoples, groups, nation-states and institutions.

Learn about Professor Dooley

FYPY 102 01  Psychology for (College) Life

Schedule: TUES/FRI 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): J. Goodwin-Uhler

Course Description:
The first year of college is full of new experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. This seminar will explore these experiences through the lens of psychological research and theory. Course readings, activities, and discussion will place a special emphasis on how contemporary and classic psychological science applies to your First Year, and how becoming educated about psychology can improve the college experience. Our discussion will focus on specific topics such as: stress, motivation, improving memory, the importance of money, picking a career, social influences, social cognition, sexuality, and happiness. We will place special emphasis on the self (including self-concept and self-esteem), as well as close relationships. The common theme for all of these topics is how we can use scholarly research in psychology to improve our everyday lives.

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FYPY 102 02  Psychology for (College) Life

Schedule: TUES/FRI 2:50-4:10 Professor(s): J. Goodwin-Uhler

Course Description:
The first year of college is full of new experiences both inside and outside of the classroom. This seminar will explore these experiences through the lens of psychological research and theory. Course readings, activities, and discussion will place a special emphasis on how contemporary and classic psychological science applies to your First Year, and how becoming educated about psychology can improve the college experience. Our discussion will focus on specific topics such as: stress, motivation, improving memory, the importance of money, picking a career, social influences, social cognition, sexuality, and happiness. We will place special emphasis on the self (including self-concept and self-esteem), as well as close relationships. The common theme for all of these topics is how we can use scholarly research in psychology to improve our everyday lives.

Learn about Professor Goodwin-Uhler

FYPY 103 01  Resistance is Futile? Social Influence in Everyday Life

Schedule: TUES/FRI 2:50-4:10 Professor(s): J. Nye

Course Description:
We live in a society that celebrates the individual; our cultural heroes are made up of revolutionaries, nonconformists, and trouble makers. At the same time, each of us feels incredible pressure to conform to the expectations and values of our society. How do we live under the pressure of these two competing forces? Somehow we manage. This course will focus on how humans walk this fine line every day, bending to the will of social forces at times and resisting them at others--and sometimes contributing to these forces, ourselves. Course readings and activities will focus on what social scientists have learned about the powerful social forces that shape humans in both positive and negative directions. These social forces will also be examined in terms of how they affect the lives of college students. In particular, we will note the academic, social, personal, and professional transformation that occurs in you as you integrate yourself into the Monmouth University community.

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Please click this image to download and read the flyer for this course titled Resistance is futile? Social influence in everyday life

Click image to read and download flyer

 

FYSW 102 02  Experiences of Children and Adolescents

Schedule: WED/FRI 10:05-11:25 Professor(s): C. Hogan

Course Description:
This course will examine issues related to childhood and adolescence. A central focus will be on how children and adolescents confront the issues that face them, as well as ethical concerns in working with children and adolescents. A central theme will be how to create the conditions in which children and youth can increase resilience. This course will also introduce the student to the University community, with special emphasis on resources, responsibilities and ethics.

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FYSW 105 01  Is Anybody Out There? Mental Health, Artistic Expression and Audience

Schedule: WED/FRI 10:05-11:25 Professor(s): R. Cuseglio

Course Description:
This course will examine the relationship between mental health, creativity, and artistic expression. A central focus is to explore how mental health impacts both the creative process and artistic expression and how the public ultimately comes to perceive the artist as a result. A central theme will be the discussion of artists who experience mental health issues and the significant creative contributions they have made to their respective fields. This course will also introduce the student to the University community, with special emphasis on three components: academics, ethics, and transition to college life.

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FYTH 103 01  Arts at Monmouth University

Schedule: TUES/FRI 11:40-1:00 Professor(s): S. Anderson

Course Description:
This course explores the various artistic offerings at Monmouth University. Students will attend concerts, plays, and gallery exhibits in an effort to better understand the various artistic and entertainment options available at Monmouth. This is not a performance class, but rather an opportunity to hear, see, feel, and experience Monmouth University's thriving arts scene.

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FYTH 103 02  Arts at Monmouth University

Schedule: WED/FRI 1:15-2:35 Professor(s): S. Anderson

Course Description:
This course explores the various artistic offerings at Monmouth University. Students will attend concerts, plays, and gallery exhibits in an effort to better understand the various artistic and entertainment options available at Monmouth. This is not a performance class, but rather an opportunity to hear, see, feel, and experience Monmouth University's thriving arts scene.

Learn about Professor Anderson