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Supporting Systems and Communities in Achieving Racial Equality: A Groundwater Analysis – presented by Joyce James

Voices for Change: Voting, Advocacy, and Action

In this presentation, Ms. James will share her journey in developing the Texas Model for addressing Disproportionality and Disparities and the Groundwater Analysis for Addressing Racial Inequities© as the foundation for creating antiracist organizational cultures for undoing institutional and structural racism and improving outcomes for all populations. Participants will gain an increased understanding of the importance of cross systems collaborations and building partnerships with poor communities of color to remove the barriers that contribute to racial inequities. The session will include discussion of the pitfalls of well-meaning and well-intentioned leaders, who in isolation of an analysis of institutional and structural racism, and a racial equity lens, continue to unconsciously contribute to sustaining and often perpetuating racial inequities in the design and delivery of programs and services.

The Strengths of Black Families, presented by Denise McLane-Davison

Voices for Change: Voting, Advocacy, and Action

The political era of the Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, Gay Rights, and The Black Power Movement demanded the inclusion of rigorous research that centered racial and gender identity as significant narratives. The emergence of Black Studies and Women’s Studies, along with student-led and national organizations incorporating the same identity politics also demanded inclusion in intellectual landscapes. During this era Black social scientists blanketed the scholarship, theory, and treatment research that anchored African cultural values, traditions, knowledge, and generational behaviors as disruptive characteristics of pathologized Black family rhetoric. Collectively, cultural scholarship named the impact of adapting Black life to oppression and anti-Blackness policy. They declared the Black family as the fundamental source of strength of the Black community and as the defense for Black life from external threats. This session provides a historical and contemporary alignment on the Black strength perspective through racial pride, resistance, and resilience.

Atlantics Virtual Panel Discussion

Join us for a World Cinema Series zoom discussion illuminating the theme “Living on the Edge: Displacement, Identity, and Resilience” by analyzing the message and impact of the 2019 film, Atlantics.

Atlantics (French: Atlantique) is a internationally co-produced supernatural romantic drama film directed by Mati Diop, in her feature directorial debut. It was selected to compete for the Palme d’Or at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival. Diop made history when the film premiered at Cannes, becoming the first Black woman to direct a film featured in competition at the festival.

The film is centered around a young woman, Ada, and her partner, Souleiman, struggling in the face of employment, class, migration, crime, family struggles, and ghosts. Working mostly with unknown actors, Diop focused in the film on issues such as the refugee crisis, remorse, loss, grief, class struggle, and taking responsibility (or not) of one’s actions. The Atlantic Ocean is used in many ways throughout the film, including as a symbol and engine for change, growth, life, and death.

The discussion of the film will be led by Dr. Julius Adekunle, Professor in the department of History and Anthropology and Dr. Lisa Vetere, Associate Professor in the department of English.

The film is available for streaming on Netflix.

When you register you will be provided the meeting link to join the conversation.

Free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Sin Nombre – Virtual Panel Discussion

Join us for a World Cinema Series zoom discussion illuminating the theme “Living on the Edge: Displacement, Identity, and Resilience” by analyzing the message and impact of the 2009 film, Sin Nombre.

Sin nombre (English: “Nameless”) is a Mexican-American adventure thriller film written and directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, about a Honduran girl trying to immigrate to the United States, and a boy caught up in the violence of gang life.

The discussion of the film will be led by Dr. Manuel Chavez, Lecturer and Director of Philosophy program; Dr. Priscilla Gac-Artigas, Professor of Spanish and Latin American Literature; and Chilean-American writer, playwright, actor, theater director and editor Gustavo Gac-Artigas.

The film is available for streaming on a number of platforms including Vudu, Amazon Prime Video, YouTube, Google Play Movies and TV, or iTunes (for rent or purchase).

When you register you will be provided the meeting link to join the conversation.

This event is part of Hispanic American Heritage Month

CANCELLED – Tuesday Night WORLD Record Club: Gilberto Gil’s Quanta Live

DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

It’s just like book club but with albums! With new advances in technology, the way we consume music through our devices, apps and on demand streaming services like Pandora, Spotify and iTunes is making the idea of the “album” as an art form extinct. Get together with other music enthusiasts on Tuesday nights to discuss some of the greatest records of all-time! Listen to the album beforehand and then come prepared to discuss. This event will featuring Gilberto Gil’s Quanta Live will be hosted by Monmouth University Professor Meghan Hynson and is cosponsored by the Institute for Global Understanding.