Skip to main content

Access and Opportunity, Diversity & Inclusion

Acts of injustice, bias, and disrespect, against groups and individuals, continue to play out across our nation. This juried exhibition will feature works that define what it means to be a good citizen in a global context, a person appreciative of all cultures and committed to fairness with respect and equality for all. By looking broadly at access and opportunity for all members of society regardless of age, disability, ethnicity, gender identity, national origin, race, religious affiliation, or sexual orientation we can help everyone recognize, appreciate, and respect difference.

HERMITAGE. THE POWER OF ART

A spectacular documentary event tours through St. Petersburg’s State Hermitage Museum, a wonderful complex of buildings with the largest collection of paintings in the world, to retrace two and a half centuries. Audiences pass through the magnificent interiors that provided a meeting point for foreign artists, architects and intellectuals creating connections through art and culture.

The history of the museum is marked by the acquisitions of the enlightened Empress Catherine II, whose personality has continued to fascinate art historians and critics over the centuries. Toni Servillo leads us on this journey through the Hermitage and the magnificent city of St. Petersburg with its waterfront, statues, canals and the bridges that form a symbolic cultural and visual element between places and distant civilizations.

LEONARDO 500

Five hundred years after his death, Leonardo continues to be one of the most admired and well-known figures in human history. An artist, architect, humanist, naturalist and military strategist, Leonardo Da Vinci was, above all else, a tireless observer constantly searching for new discoveries.

Through the use of decades-long studies and research by leading international experts, technicians and engineers, the event film exclusively analyzes the theories and modern implications behind Da Vinci’s work, allowing audiences to witness the genius of Leonardo with new and insightful perspectives.

Frida – Viva La Vida

Frida – Viva La Vida is a cinematic documentary event film that highlights the two sides of Frida Kahlo’s spirit: a revolutionary pioneering artist of contemporary feminism, and on the other, a human being tormented by agony and love.

With Asia Argento as narrator, the two faces of the artist will be revealed, by pursuing a common thread consisting of Frida’s own words: letters, diaries and private confessions. The documentary film event will alternate interviews with historical documents, captivating reconstructions and Frida Kahlo’s own paintings, kept in some of the most amazing museums in Mexico.

Just Beachy: A Reading of Sandy Stories

Help us mark the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. Readers will present stories that have been posted to “9 Feet High,” part of the Just Beachy/After Sandy installation now on view in Rechnitz Hall’s DiMattio Gallery.

We invite you to participate by reading your own story, or listen as you hear your own story being read. Join us as your Sandy experience is acknowledged through the spoken word. Your story deserves to be heard!

BEYOND GROUND ZERO: 9/11 AND THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE – Photographs by Jonathan C. Hyman

On the afternoon of September 11, 2001, Jonathan C. Hyman, an artist and photographer based in upstate New York, embarked on a journey to document responses to the 9/11 terrorist attacks appearing in the landscape around him.

Armed almost daily with his camera, ladder, and car, Hyman captured evidence of the grassroots expressions of everyday citizens spurred by this national catastrophe. His investigations took him from Maine to Florida and west to Illinois, though the majority of photographs were taken closer to New York City. The result is an expansive archive of more than 20,000 film and digital images. Hyman encountered improvised tributes and memorials on public and private property, in urban and rural areas, and on all manner of surfaces from building walls, handball courts, and vehicles to tree trunks, construction fencing, and human skin. He continued for years to document these unofficial memorials, many of which remained long after the emergence of more formal tributes.


Jonathan C. Hyman (American, b. 1960), is a fine artist and freelance photographer, living in Sullivan County, New York. A graduate of Rutgers University and Hunter College of the City University of New York’s MFA program, he documents vernacular art and contemporary American popular culture. Hyman is Associate Director for Conflict and Visual Culture Initiatives at Bryn Mawr College’s Solomon Asch Center for Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict.

This exhibition is drawn from the collection of the 9/11 Memorial Museum.

All photographs © Jonathan C. Hyman

Afrofuturist Design: Ancient Dogon To Wakandan Futures

We are extending this invitation for you to join us as we host Afrofuturist Design: Ancient Dogon To Wakandan Futures, beginning in September and ending in November 2019. We hope that you are able to join us.

Opening Reception
Saturday, September 27
6 p.m.–8 p.m.

Black Speculative Arts Movement: Black Brain Belt Symposium
Saturday, November 16
10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Vincent DiMattio: DreamPaths and Napkin Drawings

An exhibit of drawings on napkins and new works by Vincent DiMattio. DiMattio earned his MFA from Southern Illinois University and his BFA from Massachusetts College of Art. He joined Monmouth University’s faculty in 1968 where he served as the department chair for 13 years and as gallery director for more than 20 years. He has shown his work internationally in Madrid, Spain; San Juan, Puerto Rico and Pueblo, Mexico. He has also exhibited throughout the United States, and at both the Newark and Trenton Museums.

Jacob Landau: Exploring the Colors

An exhibition of works exploring the world of colors created by the American artist, humanist, and teacher Jacob Landau. Born in Philadelphia in 1917, Jacob Landau launched his career as an illustrator, winning national prizes at age 16 and a scholarship to the Philadelphia College of Art. He had over sixty one-person shows and was the recipient of many awards, including Guggenheim and National Arts Council grants. Many of his works are featured in permanent collections, such as the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. A master teacher, he retired as professor emeritus at New York’s Pratt Institute. In 1996, he was awarded an honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts by Monmouth University.

For Jacob Landau “art enables us to see the world whole and undivided.” As a humanist his art was devoted to the unity of the imagination. And at its center lies Landau’s desire for justice in the world. In the current exhibit his celebration of our love of color, shared across so many cultures, is inseparable from his humanist conviction. Color and drawing, Landau once declared, are the “twin fundaments of my style.” And he has been praised by fellow artists and critics as a colorist. His dazzling palette and expressive line exhilarate us. We find ourselves transported by their exuberant life, colors that rise up and sing for us in a work titled Flight. And yet his love affair with color does not blind him to the world of injustice.

On the one hand, his red and orange and yellow, and green and blue watercolors of gorgeous promise, so exquisitely handled in a radically imagined portrait of Isaiah dazzle us with life. But by the same token, Landau by these colors insists on the social justice that Isaiah declaimed. Justice, the artist makes clear in his beautiful and unsettling riot of forms, that he expects of us.

Uniquely, his canvass of many colors dazzles and disturbs. His understated colors in Apocalypsis fill us with foreboding, and he asks, “Whose apocalypse is it anyway ours or God’s?” Just like Landau to leave us with an uncomfortable question in the language of subtle colors. At the same time, we see a bold backdrop of brilliant yellow across the way in his Oracle 1, dramatizing the hope that resides in the human heart. A yellow we can’t shake as we walk away.

The exhibition features a selection of some twenty-one works. All are from Monmouth University’s extensive collection of Jacob Landau’s work, comprising over 300 prints, drawings and paintings. The collection was gifted to Monmouth University in 2008 by the Jacob Landau Institute of Roosevelt, NJ. This exhibit is co-sponsored by the Jewish Culture Studies Program and the Honors School of Monmouth University.

Docent tours are available (for times, contact Professor Noel Belinski 732-263-5425; email:  nbelinsk@monmouth.edu).

Water Lilies of Monet: The Magic of Water and Light

Voyage through the masterpieces and obsessions of the genius and founder of Impressionism, Claude Monet. An art-world disruptor at the turn of the 20th century whose obsession with capturing light and water broke all convention, Monet revolutionized Modern Art with his timeless masterpieces.

An in-depth, exclusive tour led by Monet scholars of the museums that house the largest collections of the prolific artist’s lilies paintings including the Musée Marmottan Monet, the Orsay Museum, the world-famous panels at L’Orangerie and concluding with Monet’s own house and gardens at Giverny, the site where his fascination for water lilies was born.