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Richard Veit PhD

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Meet Richard

Prior to coming to Monmouth, Dr. Veit worked in the field of historic preservation and directed and participated in numerous archaeological excavations in the eastern United States, as well as in Ireland and New Mexico. He is the author of five books on history and archaeology including the award-winning Digging New Jersey’s Past: Historical Archaeology in the Garden State which was published in 2002.

Dr. Veit teaches courses on archaeology, cultural anthropology, historical archaeology, Native Americans, and New Jersey history. An active member of the University’s community, Dr. Veit serves on the New Jersey Historical Commission and the board of the National Park Service’s Crossroads of the American Revolution Heritage Area. He has also chaired Monmouth’s Faculty Council and directs Monmouth’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

Collaborations that I've been involved with

Working with students is critical to Veit's research. His students, former students, and he regularly collaborate on fieldwork, publications, and presentations. Currently, Veit and his students are cataloging and analyzing the Indian artifact collection of the Hunterdon County Historical Society. They are also carrying out an archaeological study of the White Hill Mansion in Fieldsboro, New Jersey, a colonial Delaware Valley plantation.

Why I'm proud of Monmouth

Veit is proud to be a part of a community of teachers and students.

My favorite Monmouth memory

Veit says "I have two favorite Monmouth memories. The first is when the French Ambassador came to speak about my archaeological work at Point Breeze, the former home of Joseph Bonaparte in Bordentown, New Jersey. My other favorite memory is when a pair of Monmouth students, an undergraduate, Keri Sansevere, and a graduate, Sean McHugh, won best paper presentation awards at the Middle Atlantic Archaeological Conference. I felt like Monmouth had just won the World Series."


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