• CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

    2014-2015 Program Classes

    Fall 2014

    REAL ESTATE REGULATION AND DEVELOPMENT BR 405/BR 580/REC 405
    Monday evenings:
    • 6 - 8:45 p.m.
    • Bey Hall - Room 223
     
    Instructors:
    • Peter Reinhart, Esq.
    • John Giunco, Esq.
     
    DESCRIPTION: Fundamentals of the real estate development process, permits and approvals, financing, environmental laws and regulations, sustainable development, governmental regulation, history of development. Ethical issues will be discussed throughout.

    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Develop an understanding of the basics of the real estate development process.
    2. Develop a fundamental understanding of the specific rules of law in the topics covered.
    3. Develop analytical and logical reasoning abilities.

    TEACHING METHODOLOGY

    We will cover a wide array of topics, as listed below which are related to the development of real estate. The fundamental objectives are to introduce students to the basic issues and techniques and practical application of the material.

    The process for achieving the learning objectives will follow a routine in which students familiarize themselves with the fundamental rules and concepts of a chapter prior to class and then focus on the application of the rules in class. Class preparation will involve reading assignments and the review of discussion cases for class, as well as supplemental materials.

    Classes will be conducted on the assumption that students are prepared. Although the class will include explanations of the rules to supplement readings and to answer student questions, the focus of the class will be on the application of the rules. Application of the rules requires knowledge of the rules as well as analytical reasoning and communication skills. Cases from facts presented at the end of a chapter or by the instructor will be analyzed in class.

    Supplemental materials for the class may include legal documents, statutes, cases, articles, and regulations, some of which will be available through e-Campus or through internet websites with links from e-Campus.


    REAL ESTATE LEASE ANALYSIS BR 304/BR 530/REC 404
    Tuesday evenings:
    • 6 - 8:45 p.m.
    • Bey Hall - Room 223
     
    Instructors:
    • Peter Reinhart, Esq.
     
    DESCRIPTION: The course is designed to introduce the basic terminology of real estate leases and to gain an understanding of the business and legal interests of landlords and tenants and how these interests impact the negotiations of leases. The course will include a discussion of office, retail, shopping center, warehouse, ground, and residential leases. Guest speakers will be utilized to demonstrate the practical aspects of lease negotiations. One or more field trips to lease locations will be part of the curriculum.

    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Gain an understanding of the general terminology used in real estate leases.
    2. Develop an understanding of the business interests of landlords and tenants involved in negotiating real estate leases, including the fundamentals of finance, insurance, and legal matters.
    3. Develop an understanding of the role the various parties involved play in lease negotiations, including the owner, prospective tenants, brokers, lenders, and lawyers.
    4. Develop an understanding of some of the negotiation techniques employed in lease negotiations.
     

    REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL BR 310/BF 310/BR 525/BF 525/REC 402
    Wednesday evenings:
    • 6 - 8:45 p.m.
    • Bey Hall - Room 223
     
    Instructors:
    • Dr. Donald Moliver
    • Robert Gagliano, MAI, CRE, FRICS
     
    DESCRIPTION: This course will introduce the student to basic and advanced valuation theory and its functional application to real estate. Fundamental to valuation are the economic principles of real estate markets. We will examine how real estate is affected by basic supply and demand features, different land use patterns, government restrictions and competition from alternative capital investments.

    Upon establishing the basic underlying forces of the real estate market, we will cover in detail the three traditional valuation methodologies: Sales Comparison, Cost, and Income Approaches. Each of these approaches will be practically applied to various property types in case study problems. Most emphasis, however, will be applied to the Income Approach as it probably best typifies the buyer/seller relationship for the variety of income producing commercial properties we will be analyzing in class.

    At least once during the semester the class will host a visiting lecturer of special expertise in market research and/or in sophisticated real estate transactions. Microcomputers will be used in the analysis and valuation of complex income producing properties.

    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Introduce students to valuation theory
    2. Raise the level of critical thinking and analysis necessary in the valuation process
    3. Provide insights into a wide range of valuation problems with real world applications using advanced financial techniques
     

    Spring 2015

    SPECIAL TOPICS COURSE BR 498 and BR 598
    Monday evenings:
    • 6 - 8:45 p.m.
    • Bey Hall - Room 223
     
    Instructors:
    • Peter Reinhart, Esq.
     

    REAL ESTATE LAW BR 301/BR 510/REC 401
    Tuesday evenings:
    • 6 - 8:45 p.m.
    • Bey Hall - Room 223
     
    Instructors:
    • Peter Reinhart, Esq.
    • Peter Falvo, Esq.
     
    DESCRIPTION: A one-semester course designed to introduce students to the law governing real estate transactions, development, financing, and other aspects of real estate.

    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Provide a greater understanding of how real estate law impacts business decision making both specific to real estate and business generally.
    2. Understand the differences between statutory law, case law, agency law and local laws and how each impacts upon real estate decision making.
    3. Understand the ways in which real estate organizations are legally structured and the impact of such structures on transactions, permitting, governmental entities, lenders and the community.
    4. Understand how title to real estate is held and transferred and the consequences of transfers of title.
     

    REAL ESTATE FINANCE, INVESTMENT AND TAXATION BR 303/BF 303/BR 527/REC 403
    Thursday evenings:
    • 6 - 8:45 p.m.
    • Bey Hall - Room 223
     
    Instructors:
    • Thomas Stackhouse
     
    DESCRIPTION: A one-semester course designed to introduce students to the world of real estate finance, including debt and equity issues, securitization, and taxation.

    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Provide a greater understanding of how real estate financial markets work.
    2. Apply the theoretical aspects of financial economics to explain how real estate financial institutions have developed.
    3. Understand the impact upon real estate financial members of legal and regulatory constraints.
    4. Understand the relationship and viewpoints of the lender and developer.