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    Heidi Bludau

    Heidi Bludau

    Heidi Bludau is a Lecturer of Applied Anthropology. She graduated from Indiana University with a PhD in Anthropology. Her research focuses on the global market for healthcare workers. Her dissertation, “Searching for Respect: Czech Nurses in the Global Economy,” examines the motivating and mitigating factors that create a migration flow from the Czech Republic to other countries including the UK and Saudi Arabia. This work engenders a number of research interests including medical anthropology, globalization, post-socialism and gender. Her current research expands this work to consider the concept of the “global nurse” as a key player in meeting nursing shortages in developed countries. This project is based in current research on care-work migration as part of a global network, or global care chains, of which nurses make up a large part.


    Chad Dell

    Chad Dell

    Chad Dell is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin at Madison with a Ph.D. in Communication Arts. He teaches courses in television and screen studies at the undergraduate and graduate levels, including classes in television production and analysis, film history, and media policy. Gender Studies students might be particularly interested in his TV Criticism class (CO 375), which introduces a number of schools of criticism useful in the analysis of television texts, including feminist, ideological, and cultural criticism.


    Lisa Dinella

    Lisa Dinella

    Lisa M. Dinella, PhD, is a research scientist who investigates the relations between gender identity, media, academic achievement, and career development. Her research program is housed at the Gender Development Laboratory at Monmouth University, where she studies the social and interpersonal factors that influence individuals' gender development, and how these factors in turn impact academic and career pursuits. She investigates early influences on gender development, such as the impact of media and marketing on young children's gender identity. She also studies young adulthood, investigating factors that are linked to young adults' academic paths. Her research has led her to create partnerships with school stakeholders in settings ranging from preschools to universities.


    Heide Estes

    Heide Estes

    Heide Estes is Professor and Graduate Program Director in the Department of English. She received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania and her Ph.D. from New York University. Dr. Estes' field of specialization is Old and Middle English language and literature, with attention to cultural contexts including gender and religious identity, and an interest in digital humanities.

    Dr. Estes' current projects include an interactive digital edition of the Old English Dialogues of Solomon and Saturn and a book-length study of early English representations of and ideologies about the environment, and how these ideas intersect with and/or challenge contemporary ecocriticisms.

    Dr. Estes was a Visiting Fellow of Clare Hall and a Visiting Scholar in the Faculty of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic at Cambridge University during the 2014-15 academic year.


    Johanna Foster

    Johanna Foster

    Dr. Foster holds a PhD in Sociology from Rutgers University, with a concentration in Gender Studies (2000), and an MA in Applied Sociology/Social Policy (1994) from The American University, where she also earned a BA in Interdisciplinary Studies/Women's Studies (1992). She has taught sociology and gender studies for almost 20 years at a range of academic institutions, from private universities to urban community colleges, and with many of those years on the faculty at Monmouth University. She most enjoys sharing her love of sociology with students, and regularly teaches such courses as Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Gender Studies, Race and Ethnicity, and Social Stratification. For many years, she combined her teaching and research efforts in social inequalities with work to restore higher education to prison communities, co-founding The College Bound Consortium for incarcerated women in New Jersey, and the college connections program for incarcerated women in New York. Her research interests includes intersections of race, class and gender inequalities, feminist theories of gender, multiracial identities and inequalities, and critical analysis of mass incarceration with an emphasis on women and prisons.


    George Gonzalez

    George Gonzalez

    Dr. George González is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Religion and Interdisciplinary Studies at Monmouth University. He holds a B.A from Yale University and an M.A.R. from Yale Divinity School. In 2011 he received his Th.D. from Harvard Divinity School, where he concentrated in Religion and Society. At Monmouth, George teaches courses in religious studies and philosophy of religion. George's published research is in religion and capitalism.

    He has begun an ethnography of Latino/a practitioners of perennial philosophy in the Boston area and is interested in encountering the diverse ways in which Latino/a immigrants 'spiritual' practices help them navigate and reproduce relationships of power, including relationships of gender. When he has not been in school or teaching school, George has worked as a case manager at agencies in New York City and Boston that serve survivors of domestic violence. He and his partner live in the farmlands of Monmouth County and enjoy exploring the wonderful state parks New Jersey has to offer.


    Andrea Hope

    Hope

    Andrea Hope is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health and Physical Education. She received her EdD in Health Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Andrea's research interests include the impact of physical activity on girls’ and women’s health throughout the lifespan. She is currently involved in a project evaluating the impact of physical activity on breast cancer survivorship. She has published and presented in the areas of childhood obesity prevention, body image dissatisfaction, eating disorders among college age women and gender differences among those diagnosed with sexually transmitted infections. She currently teaches Women's Health, Lifespan Development and Health and Nutrition and Health. Prior to working in academia, she ran health, fitness and comprehensive wellness programs for several corporations including Sony Music Entertainment, NBC, and The Army Materiel Command. Andrea spends her free time hiking, biking, running and hanging out with her teenage daughter.


    Paul Humphrey

    Paul HumphreyDr Paul Humphrey is Assistant Professor in World Languages and Cultures at Monmouth University. He graduated with a BA in French and Hispanic Studies and a PhD in Modern Languages from the University of Birmingham, UK. Dr. Humphrey's research focuses on gender, sexuality and African-derived religions in Caribbean literature. In his doctoral dissertation, titled "Gods, Gender and Sexuality: Representations of Vodou and Santería in Haitian and Cuban Cultural Production," he foregrounds the complex nature of women's negotiation of religious, social and political life as participants in these marginalised religious communities. In 2014, Dr Humphrey was awarded a dissertation publication prize by the Association of Hispanists of Great Britain and Ireland, and his book Santería, Vodou and Resistance in Caribbean Literature: Daughters of the Spirits is forthcoming with Legenda. He has also published articles with the Journal of Haitian Studies and the International Journal of Francophone Studies.


    Jennifer McGovern

    Jen McGovern

    Jen McGovern, PhD, is a lecturer in the Department of Political Science and Sociology at Monmouth University who is passionate about teaching and learning sociology. She specializes in understanding how sport both reflects and challenges social inequalities, such as social class, race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, and sexuality. Her previous research focused on the ways that professional baseball's institutional structures have grown and changed and how local baseball fans tell narratives about baseball players as the game has grown more global in scope.


    Eleanor Novek

    Eleanor Novek

    Eleanor Novek is an Associate Professor of Communication at Monmouth University. She teaches classes in journalism, communication ethics, gender, race and media, and research methods. A former newspaper journalist, Novek conducts research on communication about and by the incarcerated, social justice and nonviolence. She is a co-editor of Working for Justice: The PCARE Anthology of Prison Education and Activism (University of Illinois Press, 2013), essays about using the arts, education, and activism to reduce crime and enhance citizenship for currently and formerly incarcerated people. Novek is state coordinator for the Alternatives to Violence Project, a nonprofit volunteer organization that offers workshops on nonviolence in prisons, schools, and community centers. In 2015 she will offer a new class, “Creating a Culture of Peace,” based on the study and practice of communication for peaceful social action and conflict resolution as practiced by individuals, groups and political movements.


    Marie Mele

    Marie Mele

    Dr. Marie Mele is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and a member of the Graduate Faculty at Monmouth University. Dr. Mele has a MS from American University and a PhD from Rutgers University. She teaches courses in research methods, criminology, and victimology. Before coming to Monmouth, Dr. Mele worked at La Salle University, the National Institute of Justice, and the Morris County Prosecutor's Office as a victim's advocate. Her work on victimization and intimate partner violence has been published in Journal of Family Violence, Journal of Crime and Justice, and Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management.


    Nancy Mezey

    Mezey

    Dr. Nancy J. Mezey is an associate dean and sociology professor at Monmouth University. Her areas of specialization are family sociology, gender studies, the sociology of sexualities, and race-class-gender studies. She teaches a variety of courses including Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Gender Studies, Family Sociology, Sociology of Aging, and Gender & Sexual Identities. Her research focuses on how historical factors, social inequalities, social activism, and policies shape and affect new family forms. Her latest book, LGBT Families, is a comprehensive analysis of the experiences of, and challenges facing, LGBT families today. Her first book, New Choices, New Families: How Lesbians Decide about Motherhood, is a multiracial feminist study of how lesbians decide to become mothers or remain childfree. Dr. Mezey has also published in a variety of academic journals and books in the areas of LGBT families and intimate partner violence. ­She is an active member of the Society for the Study of Social Problems, and also a member of Sociologists for Women in Society. Dr. Mezey is a returned Peace Corps Volunteer where she served in Mali, West Africa from 1988 to 1990. She received her PhD in sociology from Michigan State University.


    Katherine Parkin

    Parkin

    Katherine Parkin is an Associate Professor of History at Monmouth University. She is the author of two books with the University of Pennsylvania Press. Food is Love: Food Advertising and Gender Roles in Modern America (2006) won the Emily Toth Award for Best Book in Feminist Popular Culture. Her new book explores the history of women and cars and is forthcoming in 2017. She has also written on many other historical gender topics including Bruce Springsteen and masculinity; Leap Year marriage proposals; and in a forthcoming blog post on Notches: (re)marks on the history of sexuality (notchesblog.com) she reveals how an expectation of heterosexuality disguised intergenerational homosexual relationships. She has appeared on two radio programs to discuss her research, the Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane and The Bob Edwards Show, and been interviewed in newspaper stories appearing in the New York Times, Washington Post, and the Chicago Tribune. She teaches courses in U.S. Women’s History, U.S. History of Advertising and Consumerism, and the History of Sexuality in the America.


    Deanna Shoemaker

    Deanna Shoemaker

     

    Dr. Deanna Shoemaker is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies with a specialization in Performance Studies. She serves as faculty advisor for CommWorks, a student group committed to performance. She received her Ph.D. in Performance Studies with a Gender Studies portfolio from The University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation examined unruly femininities in various women's staged performances, which included solo feminist performance art, the production of a Paula Vogel play, a Chicana comic book superhero, and a feminist punk band. Her research and teaching interests include feminist performance and directing practices, performance art and social justice, resistant representations of gender, sexuality and race in popular culture, performances of multicultural literature, and performance ethnographic methods.

    Dr. Shoemaker is currently researching the impact of critical performance pedagogies in college classrooms. She teaches courses such as Performance and Social Activism, Performance Theory and Practice, Performance of Contemporary Literature, Group Performance, Voice and Diction, and Public Speaking. She is the Graduate Director for the Master's program in Corporate and Public Communication at MU.

     


    Janice Stapley

    Janice Stapley

    Janice Stapley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and a past Director of the Gender Studies Program and past Chair of the NJWGSC.

    Her background is in Development and Social Psychology and she is Principal Investigator in the Social Development Lab (Edison Science Hall E20). Her areas of research interest include gender differences in emotion, particularly during adolescence and emerging adulthood, and the relationship between emotional functioning and overall psychosocial adjustment and adjustment to college. Across the lifespan she also researches gender and cohort differences in technology use and play in the elderly.

    Professor Stapley is currently working on her line of research on adjustment to college, with a Grant from NACADA (The National Academic Advising Association).


    Claude Taylor

    Claude Taylor

    Claude E. Taylor is the Athletics Professor-in-Residence Faculty and a part of the Department of Communication. He received both his B.A. and M.A. at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. His education also includes Graduate Fellow, the Eagleton Institute for Politics, and Rutgers University. Taylor's primary areas of interest are Communication Theory and Media Studies.

    His research interests include: Social Class and Mediated Representation. This consists of the relationship between contemporary media and political participation across identity categories, such as race, class, and gender. The relationship between social class, the media, and citizenship; the intersection of popular culture and contemporary U.S. politics are included as well.


    Marina Vujnovic

    Marina Vujnovic

    Native of Croatia, Marina Vujnovic, came to United States in 2003 to pursue her graduate education in journalism and mass communication. Before coming to United States she worked as a journalist for seven years before becoming a research assistant at the Department of Graphic Design and Communications at University of Zagreb. She also worked as a PR practitioner for Cyprian based PR agency Action Global Communications. She got her PhD at the University of Iowa in 2008 where she taught as graduate assistant in supervised and stand-alone classes. Since the Fall of 2008 she's been on the faculty of the Department of Communication at Monmouth University. She is an author of Forging the Bubikopf Nation: Journalism, Gender and Modernity in Interwar Yugoslavia, and co-author of Participatory Journalism: Guarding Open Gates at Online Newspapers.


    Hettie V. Williams

    Hettie Williams

    Hettie V. Williams has a B.A., History, Rowan University, M.A. History, Monmouth University, M.A., History and Culture, Drew University, and she is currently ABD at Drew University. She has taught as a full-time lecturer in the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University for more than a decade. Her areas of teaching and research include American intellectual history, women's/gender history, and cultural studies with an emphasis on race. She is the author/editor of four books, several encyclopedia entries, book chapters, and conference papers and a regular contributor for The Huffington Post. Hettie has taught at the college level for fifteen years. Her latest research is a forthcoming edited volume entitled Bury My Heart in a Free Land: Black Women Intellectuals in Modern U.S. History (Praeger, 2017).


    Corey L. Wrenn

    Corey Wrenn

    Dr. Wrenn is a Lecturer of Sociology, holding a PhD in Sociology from Colorado State University. She specializes in vegan studies, critical feminism, and social movement theory. Her research focuses on political structures within the Nonhuman Animal rights movement, intersectional diversity efforts in social justice spaces, and anti-speciesism praxis. In 2013, she founded Vegan Feminist Network, a pro-intersectional, species-inclusive project that seeks to bridge academic and activist spaces while providing platform for marginalized voices. She is the author of A Rational Approach to Animal Rights (Palgrave 2016) and has been published in several peer-reviewed academic journals, such as Disability & Society, Animals & Society, the Journal of Gender Studies. She is the 2016 recipient of Colorado State University Department of Sociology's Graduate Student Research Excellence Award and the 2016 recipient of the University of Michigan National Center for Institutional Diversity's Exemplary Diversity Scholar.